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Post Scripts - Vacations...
I haven’t been one who has had the luxury of taking many “real” vacations. My job has afforded me some great getaways for conferences in some really cool places... Seattle, New Orleans, Charleston, Las Vegas, and Cincinnati. But those have been “working vacations” where I was obligated at least part of the time to a workshop or a conference.

Last week Mom and I had a real, bona fide vacation.

But since I don’t have a lot of experience with getting the biggest “bang for my buck,” I ended up planning big, but finding it’s really the simple things I enjoyed the most.

We flew into Charleston on Tuesday, and immediately headed toward our first itinerary item, a ferry cruise to Fort Sumter, where the first shot of the Civil War was had. Mom is a pretty big history buff, so I thought she’s enjoy it. It was a nice tour, well worth the $16 tickets.


Post Scripts - Being thankful...
As I sat here and pondered what to share with you this week, I am finishing up some last minute details for a little vacation Mom and I will be taking to South Carolina tomorrow. It is Katie’s senior year of playing college softball, and she finally got a cool spring break trip!

But what is on my heart is the courageous journey the Dickerson family is on right now.

Mike Dickerson graduated from Lathrop High School in the early 1990s, served in the military, worked at The Rural Reporter, traveled with youth ministries, and coached his daughters in softball.


Letters to the Editor - Concerns about “The Grain Belt Express Transmission Line”
The opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Lathrop Publishing.

Concerns about “The Grain Belt Express Transmission Line”
Dear Editor.
We have been residents here in Clinton County, State of Missouri for our entire lives. We are OPPOSED to The Grain Belt Express transmission line coming through, not only Clinton County, but the entire state of Missouri.


Neely Capitol Report
Greetings Friends of the 8th Legislative District.
Things are really getting busy here at the Capitol as we approach the deadline to file bills. Committee’s are hearing a great number of bills and many are being executed on every day. The house floor is a buzz of debate with those bills that have already made it to the floor. My house bill 1685, The Right to Try Act, which I presented in committee last week, was voted on in executive session this week and passed out unanimously. It now moves to the Rules Committee and will hopefully make it to the floor before spring break.


Post Scripts - Time for the next generation
It was 18 years ago this month…February 1996… when I found myself starting a grand adventure. Little ole’ me was going to start a newspaper.

I had worked in printing and publishing for several years. I started as what they used to call a “paste-up artist.” I was about 19 years old when I knew I wanted to be in “advertising.” I had some college, but not enough to do much with, other than work at a small publishing company and learn how to paste up ads and layout pages. I learned what they used to call “typesetting” on an old Compugraphic Jr., and developed my own typeset galleys of text.

The typesetting machines used long strips of film on a large wheel for each font. As you typed your copy, a single line displayed what characters you were typing. When the line “returned,” there was no going back. The characters you just input were being “shot” onto the chemical-reactive paper, and you didn’t know what you had until you ran it through the dual-chemical developer in the dark room.

My first encounter with desktop publishing came in about 1985-86. (I like to say 1985 because that’s only one year after Apple’s famous 1984 Super Bowl commercial.) My publisher rented time at Moss Copy Center on Johnson Drive in Shawnee Mission, KS on an Apple SE. I learned how to use Pagemaker 1.0 that ran from a floppy disk, and printed my pages out on something called a PostScript printer.

We published digest-sized magazines that ran the playbill for Theatre League’s Broadway shows at the Midland. I also did some programs for Starlight Theatre, which I was most proud of. I created my own 4-color separations with “ruby litho” and took photographs to a shop to have them shoot a screen so they could be printed. It’ a process I can’t even find on Google today.

Fast-forward ten years.
By 1995, Steve Jobs had left Apple; some nerd named Bill Gates took over the PC and software world; and I was home raising three little ones. I had kept up with the Apples and the software. They were on PageMaker 4.0 by now, but I had settled into Lathrop, earned my real estate license, and joined something called the “Lathrop Merchant’s Association.” It was the happening place, and I wanted to help with this wonderful event called the Friendship Festival.

It wasn’t long before I learned there was a concerted effort to bring a newspaper back to Lathrop. The Lathrop Optimist had been shut down just a few years earlier (1990-1992 or something like that), and the pillars of Lathrop felt an overwhelming obligation to see Lathrop once again, have their “own paper.”

Now, I knew the mechanics of how all this computer stuff worked, although we were still about five years away from digital photography. I always enjoyed writing, but beyond the ramblings of a teenager in her journal, the writing at my editing job at the magazine was little more than gathering items for a calendar of events.

Tommy Williams was the champion of this effort to find an established publisher to print a Lathrop newspaper. He, Susie Freece, Jim Plowman, Betty Mae Momyer and Jim Eames reached out to a few small town publishers. The closest we came was the group out of Carrollton. They came to visit Lathrop to see what kind of proposition they could make.

Our business base was small. The promise of a feasible venture for an outside company to come in, hire a staff, and take on the production of a newspaper was bleak.

They left us with a challenge: Commit 1,000 subscribers, and they would do it.

Quickly, the word got out. The Merchant’s Association immediately had over 200 paid subscribers. They would hold the checks and cash them only IF the newspaper became a reality.

After the initial 200 or so, the subscriptions came in more slowly. It did not appear we would get any closer to our goal.

As someone who had worked in the publishing industry, and who loved the town that had become “home,” I was excited about the possibility of having a newspaper office in town. I could see myself sitting in the office, taking birth announcements at the front desk, and being the “spreader of good news.” I could inform people how to get involved, where to go to get help, and what great, amazing things people were doing to make Lathrop a better place to live.

It was the Friendship Festival in 1995, when I thought, “What if people could see a sample of what it would be like to have a newspaper?” “What if people could see that what’s going on their community is worth reading about?”

I asked the Carrollton publishers if we could print a single sheet sample. Their “yes” sent me on a mission that weekend. The Lathrop Swim Club pool had just had an entire renovation… Lathrop had a new superintendent, I interviewed him. Football practice had just started and Lathrop had a new coach, I interviewed him. I took pictures, wrote stories, and came up with fillers, working on a Windows 3 machine at Heritage Real Estate office. It was before the day of email, so I drove to Carrollton with the floppy disk, and returned to pick up the finished product a couple days later.

We set up a booth at the Friendship Festival and handed out our samples. I, along with others, went door-to-door, selling subscriptions with a promise that we would hold their checks until we knew we were going to have a paper.

The effort gathered about another 160 subscriptions. Family members were buying 2-3 subscriptions for their out-of-state relatives, kids away to college, and friends who had long-since moved away.

It was $25.00 for a year. It is still $25.00 for a year.

But alas, November came, a full six months of effort, and it did not look like we were going to reach our goal of 1,000.

I remember the Merchant’s Association meeting when Tommy, who served as our treasurer, and was diligent to do the right thing, said, “Well folks, it looks like we’re just going to have to send the money back.”

“Noooooooo!” I couldn’t accept that! Lathrop wanted a newspaper! I saw the passion in the people who had worked so hard, and trusted us with their money, to see this dream die! I saw the pride in the people and the love for their town. I saw an independent, scrappy community that didn’t want to take anyone’s back seat.

“I can do this,” I said, before I realized the words were coming out of my mouth.

I knew the investment to get it going was just a few thousand dollars to buy a computer and a printer. I had worked with many web printers over the years, and knew that although a short run to meet the needs of the Lathrop population wasn’t going to attract the big guys in the city, Tim Cole from Kearney said that the publisher in Gallatin would run short web press work.

The initial investment was advanced advertising dollars a handful of local businessmen pledged. Bailey Funeral Home, Lathrop Bank, Dr. Tim Barry, Hawn’s Carpet, the Rotary Club, and the Merchant’s Association. And Gerald Snodgrass’ kitchen table at Heritage Real Estate.

Never in my wildest dreams did I imagine I was someday going to be a newspaper publisher and own my own business. A gentleman named Reed Gerber, new to the community, with his lovely wife Lois, came to Lathrop from Rockford, IL to be close to their son and daughter-in-law Jim & Barbara Gerber, helped make that possible. He had a creative streak looking for an outlet, and graciously accepted the position of Assistant Editor.

Never in my wildest dreams did I think I would have the wonderful privilege of announcing to the world a new addition to the family. Never in my wildest dreams did I imagine I would find local government so interesting and important.

I have seen young men and women graduate high school and are now in their mid-30s with families of their own. I have seen victorious football teams, and girls basketball teams that made the front page for just for winning their first game…. In two years!

I have had the privilege of knowing outstanding leaders in the business, government, civic service organizations and school communities. I have watched little ones toddle on stage for the Little Mister and Miss contests… only to return years later with their own little ones for the Baby Show. We would have printed birth announcements for those in the graduating class of 2014. I think you could call that a “generation.”

I remember when I got my first “E-mail” account…lpubl@aol.com. I remember when dial up was the only thing that connected me to the outside world. And then digital photography… and then portable document formats… and then FTP portals. We began posting our stories and pictures on our website in 1999. There are 15,000 news stories archived online, and over 19,000 photos.

The last ten years, we have had not one, but two newspapers. Lathrop’s paper, and Gower’s paper. We branched out in 2001, expecting Polo, Stewartsville, and Gower to all embrace a local newspaper like Lathrop did.

We have definitely found a home in Gower, thanks to the tireless work and special relationships my Mom has with them. Lathrop and Gower readers each are so incredibly gracious with their expressions of appreciation for the work we have done.

I haven’t always been everywhere at all times. We haven’t always hit the mark with all the who-what-where-when-why’s of the local happenings. But my life has been full… and blessed… and forever changed by these last 18 years. And over the years, I have been humbled and honored by you who have let me know I have touched your lives.

Now, for those of you who are still with me… you can be the first to know, outside a very small circle of friends and family.

It’s time for me to retire. It’s time for me, Mom, and can you believe it? Even Grandma thinks she needs to retire! (At 87, I’ll give her that!)

It’s time for a change in my life. For more than half of my adult life, I’ve been “The Paper Lady.” For most of that, it was my creative outlet… my connection with the community… my purpose.

It’s time to move on, and enjoy my home, my husband, and grow in my career at Cameron Insurance Companies. And a garden. I want a garden.

I was 30 years old when we rolled out the first issue of The Lathrop News. We’ve been able to tell a lot of wonderful stories, and we’ve filled the pages of countless scrapbooks. We’ve been blessed by other business owners who value your readership and patronage. And most importantly, you’ve welcomed us into your homes for these last 18 years.

The story doesn’t need to end here, though. This business, though it won’t get make anyone rich or powerful, can continue. If there is the same passion, the same pride, and the same support out there that was there almost 20 years ago… this could usher in a new generation of “newspaper-dom.”

I believe there is a champion out there…another eager, passionate storyteller out there… who believes in the good a local newspaper can do. Who believes in the important part of a community’s history it can play. I believe there is enough support out there that would welcome a fresh voice into their homes.

I believe the work that has been done over the last 18 years is worth continuing. And taken to the next level. And cherished for another generation to come.

Do you know someone? Are you that someone? You can reach me at my personal email: lpublster@gmail.com

I may not get my garden in this spring, but I’m not missing the next growing season.


Letters to the Editor - 2/6/14 Edition
The opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Lathrop Publishing.

Letter to the Editor
At the Lathrop Council meeting on Jan. 21, I asked Alderman Peters why he wanted to replace the Park Board members as he had asked Don Moore on public record about replacing the members of the Park Board. Peters became defensive and stated that was not what he meant. When I asked again about the comment, he did not reply. Did someone on the Park Board step on his toes and tell him to mind his own business. He seems to want to be in charge of the Parks, Goppert Community Center and the Police Department.


Post Scripts - Goodbye, dear skyline...
Sometimes, there are times in our life when saying goodbye to something so comfortable, so much a part of our life, is a difficult change to make.

I didn’t live in Lathrop as a child, but my children have lived here their whole life. The red-topped tower served a landmark in finding their way through the streets of Lathrop on their first bicycle trip across town. Knowing that as we approached it, swings and slides and jungle gym climbing was only moments away.


Post Scripts - A bright spot in the county
With a current Missouri Press card in hand, Bernie Cassity returned to the Commissioner’s office last Thursday to sit in on the discussions with Debbie Davis, Brenda Norton, and Dale Hunsburger of the University of Missouri Extension office.

There is no doubt this vital piece of Clinton County does good things for our young people and population in general. Their approach was respectful and well prepared.

The good news is, it appears the Extension has gotten through the budget cuts unscathed. Surviving, by a thread, thanks to the generous endowment of the VanBurens from 1988.


Second District COMMISSIONER'S December UPDATE
By: Larry King, Second District Commissioner

• The Commission met with R&B to discuss equipment snow removal plans. R&B are not responsible for clearing private drive entrances.
• Richard Keck reported to the Commission that the caution and road signs were missing on Winn Road.
• Presiding Commissioner Wilken attended WIB meeting and TAC meeting.
• Zoning Director Beth Farwell turned in November Zoning report of $4,481.75.
• Sheriff Porter Hensen was before the Commission with the new contract for Daviess-DeKalb County jail.
• Sheriff Hensen reported that his department had received a Law Enforcement Block Grant. There will be a 10% match which totals $8,829.27
• Extension Board members Mark Hoover, Jenna Thompson, John Kilgore and Debbie Davis were before the Commission to discuss their 2014 budget.
• The Commission discussed new jail projects.
• Commission reviewed bills.


8th District Jim Neely’s Capitol Report
Greetings from the Missouri State Capitol! I hope your week was an enjoyable one. Mine was extremely busy as I begun to shift gears into a new routine.

House Moving Quickly to Advance Legislation
While the temperatures have remained chilly, activity in the House has heated up here in the second week of session. Already we have seen more than 150 bills referred to House committees where they are being discussed and thoroughly vetted. This week the hearings rooms in the basement were packed with legislators and citizens who spoke for and against many of these bills.


Post Scripts - Robbing Peter to pay Paul
It’s a sad state of affairs. If you are just simply “getting used” to the fact that Clinton County, and the City of Lathrop, are sucking air, then your conscience has been seared.

Our economic condition is pathetic.

Perhaps I didn’t even realize how bad it was, until I hear of other areas of the Midwest that are much better off.


Lager Capitol Report: The 2014 Legislative Session is Open
Last week, we convened the Second Regular Session of the 97th General Assembly. This will mark my final year in the State Senate and will bring to a close my 12 years of public service. But, before I go, I am going to try and fix some of the broken processes that continue to plaque our public policy process.

While we often talk about big issues from tax relief to health care, what is seldom discussed are the processes that drive our public policy. These processes truly impact how we run as a state. Therefore, with the right processes in place, the taxpayers will always be protected, regardless of the whims of whoever may be in office at the time.


Straight Talk With Sam Graves: The Year Ahead
The second session of the 113th Congress officially convened this past week. And while it may be a new year, I intend to continue finding commonsense solutions to the problems facing our nation using Missouri values as my guiding principles. That starts with our nation’s debt and unemployment.

We’ve begun to make progress on the debt and deficit. Since becoming the majority in the House, we have cut $165 billion in spending. Still, we need further meaningful and serious changes to the spending status quo. Washington must start asking the question: is this program important enough to continue borrowing $17 trillion from China and other nations and loading that debt on future generations?


Be Our Guest - 1/9/14 Edition
The opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Lathrop Publishing.

By Bernie Cassity
Happy New Year. Good riddance to 2013. One of the saddest years in memory for the 1960’s generation, and just when us 65+ year old folks need health care the most in our later years, we now see that the new health care system is destined, both mathematically and morally, to be the worst governmental takeover in America’s history. We are in a serious Police State with un-constitutional NSA surveillance looking into every facet of our life. If there ever was such a thing as privacy, it’s gone now.

The two-party system has failed. It’s not about your so-called political party affiliation. It’s about criminality and evil. We are living in socialism. There is little to no transparency at any level of government. Obamacare, the straw that will break the camel’s back, has been crafted to seal the inevitable economic doom of our nation, joining the myriad of other government takeovers and Ponzi schemes that have been foisted on American citizenry since the passage of the Federal Reserve Act, December 23, 1913, one of the darkest days in our history, sounding the financial death knell for the future of American “money.” Earlier that year in February of 1913, the table was set for the planned takeover of the wealth in America with ratification of the 16th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution and the establishment of a graduated income tax. President Abraham Lincoln, in the early 1860’s had first named a “Commissioner of Internal Revenue” to help pay for the Civil War. Then, in 1913, the name is changed to the Internal Revenue Service, and the first IRS 1040 form is printed. The IRS becomes the enforcement arm for the new tax legislation and claimed the authority and administration to collect the taxes.


Lager Capitol Report - 1/2/14 Edition
By Brad Lager
This week, we will usher in a new year. With this new year, many Missourians will make resolutions aimed at improving their lives as they work to manage current challenges and prepare to embrace future opportunities. Similarly, every legislative session is an opportunity to address Missouri’s current challenges and make the bold decisions necessary to enhance the future economic opportunities for Missouri’s hard working citizens.


Notes of Whatever - 12/26/13 Edition
To all the faithful readers in Gower, wishing you all a Happy & Prosperous New Year, may 2014 be a wondrous year for each and every one.

The Christmas Party at the Gower Convalescent Center this past Friday was so much fun. Watching the excitement of the residents with their families and all the love that was shared, filled the old heart with the warm fuzzy feelings that are perfect for this time of year.


Post Scripts - Another year comes to a close
There is nothing less original than a New Years column about New Years Resolutions. Unless, of course, you Google “Funny New Years Resolutions” and use someone else’s.

The funny thing is, they are only funny when you’re reading them first-person. Lots of blogs out there about someone’s funny New Years resolutions...but they are theirs. My funny bone isn’t so funny these days, so I suppose I should just get real.

So I decided I’d better come up with some of my own. Actually, just one.


Neely Capitol Report - 12/19/13 Edition
Nothing seems to be more annoying than to be actively involved with something and be interrupted by the phone ringing only to find out it is an unsolicited phone call from a telemarketer. I’ve found this to be occurring more and more frequently. The Missouri’s No Call Law has been expanded to cover personal cell phones in addition to residential land lines. Missourians may now register their cell phone numbers by going to www.ago.mo.gov or by phone at 1-866-662-2551. Telemarketers that violate Missouri’s NO Call law by continuing to call residents who have registered their phone numbers are in jeopardy of facing legal action. Complaints may also be filed at the website listed above.


Straight Talk With Sam Graves: Bureaucrats and School Lunches
It has become clearer than ever that Washington is out of touch with America. Too many bureaucrats and politicians don’t understand the effects of the rules and laws they create.

Take the National School Lunch Program for example. For the 2012-2013 school year, the Obama Administration began implementing new nutritional standards for school lunches. These rules coming down from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) are making it harder for school districts to do their job, leading to increased costs and, in some cases, hungry children.


Post Scripts - Christmas Therapy
Okay, my inbox did not receive a flood of emails with words of wisdom, gentle reminders, or even some good scriptures to help me get over my Christmas blahs.

But I think I found my answers... or at least some simple pleasures in this last week.

Just tonight, I attended the High School Choir Christmas concert. As I arrived, the lights were low, Carmen Bennett was conducting, and I heard some beautiful male voices carrying the undertone, with altos and sopranos harmonizing and flittering on the ceiling. Like a layered dessert, where each level offers a different surprise and texture.


Be Our Guest - Block Grain Belt Express Opponents
The following information has been provided by opponents to the proposed Grain Belt Express.

Hello,
I am writing today to ask for your help on an important issue concerning Missouri. It is an issue that concerns freedom, property rights, imminent domain issues, and vast swatches of agricultural land. A huge out of state company called Grain Belt Express wants to run a gigantic ugly 600,000 volt electric line through Missouri to provide “wind” energy to the East coast. It will be the first 600,000 volt line in the United States and has unique dangers. Because wind is unpredictable it would likely use coal generated energy as well.

One of these routes would go right through our property turning our woods into a glowing humming possible cancer causing eye sore. We operate a family farm. Three generations work together to be a good steward to our land and to our cattle. The line would divide our property, be 300 feet from our house, destroy our only wind break, and ultimately force us to move. Many other family farms would be similarly impacted.
Jennifer Gatrel
Cowgill, MO


Post Scripts - Not skimping on a Christmas column
By Pauli Clariday
I have a confession. I am tired. It is late. And this was the last spot on the page to fill up.

I started to look on line for something “classic” I could run here... but I felt bad and decided I needed to write.

Yes, we are only two weeks away from Christmas... but I can’t hardly say it feels like Christmas.


“Straighten Up and Fly Right” for Our Kids”
In case anyone missed it, this last week Arne Duncan, the US Secretary of Education, tried to simplify the opposition of Common Core to “white suburban moms who -- all of a sudden -- (discovered that) their child isn’t as bright as they thought they were, and their school isn’t quite as good as they thought they were.”

The whole situation right now reminds me of a fun song by Nat King Cole--Straighten Up and Fly Right:


Letters to the Editor - 11/21/13 Gower Edition
Dear Norma & All,
Thanks for all you do for the community. Have a wonderful and blessed Thanksgiving.

Best Wishes,
Steve & Ann Mowry & family


Norma,
You do a great job of covering the news for Gower.

I enjoy your paper, a great Thank you to you!
Orval Jensen

Hello Norma,
I won’t be taking the paper again. But wanted you to know how much I enjoyed reading it every week.

The pictures of school events were really great. I kept them and made a Scrap Book for Jace, all four years.

I tried most of the recipes and loved the jokes from the senior centers.

Jace is at Highland College now - I’m glad he’s only 11 miles from me.

Many Thanks,
Janice Zeit


Post Scripts - The discussion that never ends...
By Pauli Clariday
If I hadn’t promised to finish my thoughts from the week before last, I would have written about Sunday’s meeting and the conversations surrounding Common Core.

I’m glad I’ve had a little bit more time to digest it all. I have come nowhere near to figuring out all the answers, but while I have learned more technical things about how nationalized standards have come about, my heart is still with the parents who speak out and challenge what does not feel right to them.

What most impressed me at Sunday’s meeting was the exceptional amount of courtesy and respect shown by the parents. The ladies (Moms) who spoke were articulate and refrained from emotion, which laid beneath the surface. Their concerns came from a very real place inside them... be it a fierce sense of parental helplessness that will put any mama bear on her hind legs... or from a conservative, skeptical patriotism that distrusts uninvited federal oversight.


Be Our Guest - Our Kids are not test taking Robots
Until “meet the teacher” night for my daughter, I had not heard of Common Core. I was concerned that the changes in curriculum had her (a 3rd grader) doing math 2/3 of the day and reading the other 1/3 (not to mention all science and history were now only read about, not hands on). She is very smart, understood math fine last year. This year even with extra math and tutoring after school, she is getting the equivalent of a C (yes equivalent, letter grades are out the window, now kids are being rated on a scale of proficiency, not percentage). Instead of focusing on the basics for a solid foundation, she is learning things I did not know until middle school (as an advanced student)! Writing assignments my son is doing in 2nd grade are being graded as more advanced than he has been prepared for. He fortunately is breezing through the math.. but he thinks some of the questions are ridiculous.

Helping with homework is super stressful for everyone, because the way parents were taught is now the “wrong” way. Many parents are complaining about this, how can we help our kids at home if we don’t know how it is being taught.. seems like the curriculum is written confusing to purposely make parents believe only “experts” can teach our kids.


Post Scripts - Fear
By Pauli Clariday

I said I was going to have to think about this one. You know, Greed, Hate, and Fear? The three descriptors that seem to frequently get thrown conservative’s way?

And I did. I thought about it… a lot. The context in which I first got a glimpse of the memes my liberal friends were sharing, was a list of “the world will fall apart” consequences for things we all would, today, understand as horribly blind and ignorant thinking. Give people of all races equal human rights? Give women the right to vote? Organize labor for workers in unsafe, inhumane conditions? These are the kind of things we have evolved from. The kind of things people stood up for that were fundamentally wrong in our early practices as a nation.

There are many, many things about politics and government that I won’t pretend to know anything about. I’m not looking to point out divisive issues; I’m looking to find common ground.


Post Scripts - Greed. Hate. Fear.
Okay, show of hands. How many did NOT miss the election season this year? I sit here on election night of a pretty quiet year, and realized that despite a couple heated ballot issues, and the oh-so-heated Affordable Care Act bantering, it’s been quiet.

I have found myself jumping into conversations that maybe I should stay out of. In my round about kind of way, I try to interject what “I” think is a reasonable perspective, but I still have my opinions. And I know they will be different from others’.

I have friends from all across the political spectrum. I’ve probably made everyone mad at some point, but I like to think I fall somewhere in the middle of things, and that I am able to respect differing views.

I came across a group tonight whose banner picture was “Liberal. Because Greed, Hate and Fear Don’t Work for Me.” Or something like that.

I consider myself conservative. And it’s funny. I feel exactly the same way.


Post Scripts - Stuck in the middle...
I was born in 1965. The year of the Mustang, Mary Poppins, and Vietnam. And Lyndon B. Johnson.

I should have stopped at “Mustang.”

A scroll through Wikipedia’s page on 1965 pretty much explains this nagging sense of “missing out” I’ve felt my whole life.

As a little kid, I had some teenage girls up the road. They were “hippies”. I mean, real, live hippies. One of them ran off with her boyfriend and probably hitchhiked to California or something like that. I remember it being scary, and I knew I didn’t ever want to scare anyone, but I really wanted to be a hippie when I grew up.

Much to my chagrin, however, by the time I got old enough to wear bell bottom boys Levis and my dad’s oversized flannel shirts, all the cool girls were wearing Jordache and Calvin Klein. Inheriting my mom’s long, straight hair was perfect for a chain of flowers around my head. But alas, it would not do Farrah Faucett flips, nor hold a poodle perm for more than a month.

Just about the time I got used to being a mid-60s-born child and jumped into Bruce Springsteen’s Born in the USA era, I was reminded of my generation-miss when The Big Chill came out.


Letter to the Editor: Asking questions, but not getting answers
10/31/13 Edition:

It appears that certain members of the city council think they do not need to obey state laws or city ordinances. I have asked on more than one occasion, who authorized the Chief of Police to buy all new uniforms, when it was not a budgeted item. No minutes of any kind are in the records to show that the council voted for the uniforms.

The city had to borrow money last year to be in the black as State law requires. The price of the uniforms and the decision by certain council members that the police department not do their job of traffic left the city about $23,000.00 in the red. So, like the federal government, we borrow out of debt.

I know that some people will disagree about traffic stops, but they are a necessary part of police work to catch all types of crime related persons. ie: drunks, drivers with no license or insurance, persons wanted on warrants and at time burglary suspects.


Be Our Guest: Common Core - The loss of Freedom
I am about to sound like an activist, but that’s not what I started out to be after I left the Navy and settled down to life as a stay-at home mom. For many comfortable years, I was an avid garage sale shopper and self-diagnosed addict to hair bows for my daughters. The shift began when my girls started school and I had to shoulder the proper parental duty of attending school board meetings. During these board meetings, I heard phrases and references to things I didn’t understand. So like many of my generation, I Googled. That’s how I found IT.

IT is Common Core. Our fancy state has decided to church IT up, so here IT is known as Missouri Learning Standards. By definition, IT is a set of national education standards. But there is more. Three of my main concerns are how IT bypassed the legislature, how we are going to fund IT, and how data IT collects will be used.

Setting a statewide curriculum is not meant to be implemented by simple signatures on dotted lines. There is a legal process. This process includes a little document called the Missouri Constitution. That Constitution requires the Missouri State School Board to obtain legislative approval to make changes to the state’s curriculum. This was not done with Common Core. Our governor Jay Nixon signed us up for Common Core ignoring the annoyances of legal votes from our legislature. As a veteran, I find this slightly upsetting. No, maybe better yet, I’m a house-wife turned activist over such an act. Freedom is worth a fight.


Neely Capitol Report
By Jim Neely, Missouri House of Representatives

I guess everyone is talking about our federal government shutdown. I am not sure where to start on this one, but one thing I do know is that we have individuals who are suffering and hurting because we CANNOT come to an agreement on how to move our country forward. All of us that work depend upon getting a paycheck at the end of the week or month. These people that are employed by the government, and depend upon them for their paycheck, will be getting nothing. It isn’t fair that our politicians in Washington are withholding these paychecks from the hardworking, just because they can’t agree on an issue. Maybe we should suspend their paychecks for a while and let them know how it feels to be in this situation.

The President and Congress MUST come to the table and stop this madness that is splitting this country apart.


Straight Talk With Sam Graves: The Government Shutdown
As I write, our government is mired in the midst of a shutdown for the first time since 1996. Congress’ inability to reach an agreement to keep the government open is extremely unfortunate as it personally affects so many Americans.

Here in the House, we’re working to find agreement to end this shutdown. As we continue to seek such an agreement, we’ve passed a series of bills designed to fund several key priorities, such as veterans benefits and cancer research, in the meantime. We also passed legislation that would provide pay for furloughed employees of the federal government, like those working for the Department of Veterans Affairs in Kansas City or the Department of Agriculture in New London, once the government is fully back up and running. All of these initiatives have been bipartisan.


Post Scripts - There is something in the air...
A few weeks ago, Cindy Weers wrote an editorial about being positive. In her piece, she cited an author she came across on Facebook, Will Bowen.
Watch your thoughts, for they become words.
Watch your words, for they become actions.
Watch your actions, for they become habits.
Watch your habits, for they become character.
Watch your character, for it becomes your destiny. Will Bowen

I did not catch this until just a few days ago, when my grandmother on my dad’s side sent me a book, entitled “A Complaint Free World.” In this book, authored by Will Bowen, he used her story about how, in 1967, she was in a devastating car accident, which left her without an eye, and her facial bones crushed.

Will is her pastor in Kansas City, and this is his second “Complaint Free World” book. He chose to tell her story because despite this horrific, life-changing event.. it really didn’t change her all that much. (I actually took pictures of the pages from the book that told her story. You can find them on my timeline photo albums.)


Be Our Guest: Only My Opinion
By Ed Shrewsbury

The citizens of Lathrop School District, Clinton County and possibly all the counties of the 43rd Judicial District need to get their priorities straight.

First, Lathrop School District; the district had meetings and sent out surveys to address going to a four day school week.

Most people will agree that resulted in some advantages for our students, i.e. the elimination of block scheduling and every other Wednesday early out.

However, overall test scores, attendance and college preparedness of our students have not improved and long term effects on our primary grade students may not be seen or recognized until those children reach the upper grades.


Post Scripts - Oh, and did I tell you about.... SQUIRREL!!
Each week I start writing this column with something specific on my mind. Sometimes I rally, sometimes I rant.

But most of the time, there is something that warrants a little more thought.. a little more follow up... and a little bit of unanswered questions.

I have come to own my adult attention deficit. Which, I guess, is fine for me. I mean, I have come to terms with many, many of my shortcomings. That is good for me... good for the soul, if you will, but unfortunately, it leaves some dangling participles and probably some of you scratching your head, wondering if you missed something.

So, in an effort to tie up some loose ends, I will go back and wrap up some topics I previously discussed.

1) The City Park Water Tower. Yes, some of you showed up at an event that never happened, looking to see how you could help save the Lathrop Water Tower.

After much research, and some very specific phone calls, I didn’t hear good news.


Post Scripts - Getting better..
Missouri Press Association’s Better Newspaper Contest. For 17 years, we’ve been a member of the state association for newspapers. We receive their newsletters, accept their advertising, and pay our dues.

There was a time when everything about this industry and art facinated me... drew me in... and I devoured everything I could find. I soaked it up like a sponge.

With resources always-so-limited, and little ones at home, and ball games to cover and county meetings to attend, there just never seemed to be enough time or money to attend annual events. Busy with the day to day survival, spending two days at a hotel just seemed, well, so extravagent.

Each year I’ve seen the Better Newspaper Contest come and go. Each year, we thought “we should give it a try, what could it hurt?” There are a bazillion categories to enter, though, and at $7.00 a pop, it would be easy to drop $500 for an entry fee for everything you thought you had a chance at.


Post Scripts - It’s scary when you care...
By Pauli Clariday
That wasn’t exactly what I set out to name this column. I wanted to be cheery and upbeat; rah rah and Kumbaya. And all of that shares in my world right now... right in the same room as the kind of fear you feel when someone you love is on the verge of disaster.

Last week I referred to rowing upstream. About how I didn’t understand how things worked the way they worked, and why they didn’t work the way I thought they should work.

I continued to have a week of hair-pulling, head-pounding frustrations, and a feeling of helplessness to change anything.

I will tell you this: There has been a request for a building permit for a vacant lot on Oak Street. Not on one end of Oak Street or the other... but rather right... in... the... middle... of... Oak... Street.


Be Our Guest: From Cameron to Homeland Security... without leaving Cameron
The opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Lathrop Publishing.

Written by Corey Sloan, former Cameron Police Chief. Borrowed from his Facebook page.
Some folks have asked privately what I will be doing with the Missouri Department of Public Safety (DPS), Office of Homeland Security (OHS). I worked for a division with DPS when I was with the State Fire Marshal’s Office in the mid to late 90’s. This was the door that was opened for me and my family and I walked right in!

Work with me on this long post as it is a bit convoluted to explain via social media. However, it is the best way to let everyone know what I will be doing at OHS. First and foremost I want to be clear, my family and I WILL NOT be leaving Cameron, at least in the immediate foreseeable future. I have been extremely picky on what career path I chose after leaving the City of Cameron Police Department. I entered public safety, nearly 25 years ago, with a vision to make a difference one step at a time. I am proud to say my vision and desire is as strong now as it was in 1989 when I rolled out on my first fire engine / rescue with Brenda Grooms, Mike Grooms, Jim Cashatt and Jeff Roe at Station #2 in Kidder, MO.

I am looking forward to working again with several people who I have been friends with for many, many years. I will also get to travel across Missouri making new friends, colleagues, and seeing places I have never seen before.


Post Scripts - Numbers, numbers, numbers
There is always a story in numbers. Kind of like how a baseball announcer can give you a statistic for just about any play, any situation, and any left handed batter in a squeeze play situation with two outs and bases loaded in a ball park with water fountains on the right field fence.

I am exposed in an industry where at one point in my job, I realized that making things pretty and putting that “wordsmith” touch on things wasn’t nearly as important as analyzing and understanding numbers.

The district’s MAP scores, and the DESE website can satisfy the number cruncher in the most devoted actuary.

I am in no way affluent in “predictive modeling speak”, but I can make an Excel pivot table sing.

I don’t envy the school officials who have to make sense of all of it. I can take a quick look, but truly do turn to those who live and breathe the numbers all day.


Post Scripts - 8/22/13 Edition
Here I go again, finding myself with a little, bitty space. That’s okay, I am more than happy to share my space with Donna Frazier’s story, and the important information about rural burglaries.


Letters to the Editor - East Buchanan C-I Superintendent addresses Vetoed SB 253 and how override would effect District
The opinions expressed in the letters to the Editor do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Lathrop Publishing.

The August 1, 2013 edition of the Rural Reporter contained an article from Representative Jim Neely on the supposed merits of House Bill 253 which was vetoed by Governor Nixon and now faces an override vote. I normally try to stay out of the political arena and keep my opinions to myself; however when the impact of legislation has potential to harm the students and staff I care so deeply for, I feel obligated to get involved.

As this argument rages throughout the state, I am reminded of the proverbial cow looking for greener grass on the other side of the fence! Proponents of HB 253 are making the claim that we need to keep up with states like Kansas. After Kansas passed their version of the currently proposed legislation, the independent credit rating agencies; Standard & Poor’s, Fitch and Moody’s lowered their bond rating from AAA+ to AA, a 2-point reduction. The effect of the credit reduction is to raise borrowing rates for schools and all government agencies. At East Buchanan we have been waiting to pay down our current debt on the construction from 2007 so that we can finish the high school without asking voters for an increase in local taxes. If the state bond rating is reduced due to HB 253 (as the credit rating agencies have indicated it will), future construction will be delayed by a minimum of three years according to our bonding company. Over the course of three years, construction rates will increase and the total cost of the project to our local taxpayers will be significantly more.


Letters to the Editor - Where was the Mule Show coverage?
The opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Lathrop Publishing.

With all the hoopla about the Mule Dynasty theme at the Lathrop Friendship Festival this year, it seems quite natural that the annual Lathrop Mule Show last Saturday at the Antique Showgrounds should have had some news coverage with at least a couple of photos.


Post Scripts - It’s about the businesses!
Every time I have the privilege of talking to a brand new business owner in Lathrop, I am always so excited about the enthusiasm they bring. The hope, the true gift of philathropy that lives alongside their entrepreneurial spirit.

When you think of local businesses, I hope you are thinking about the men and women that sponsor events at the Friendship Festival and the schools.

I hope you think about the folks that, if they live in town also, are spending their money at the local grocery stores, at the gas stations, at the beauty salons, and at the gift shops.

When you look up and down Oak Street, or Center Street, or Hwy 116, I hope you see people who believe in this town and are willing to put a dog in the fight and place their bets on winning.


Be Our Guest - Nickel Jar
The opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Lathrop Publishing.

I propose we place a nickel jar at every business in Lathrop. Each time someone says something negative or unsupportive of our town we ask them to put a nickel in the can. Let’s promote positivity in Lathrop!

My great grandfather closed up his elevator in Mirable, MO, and moved his family to Lathrop, MO in 1899. My great uncles and great aunts, uncles and aunts, father, siblings, cousins have grown up here because my great grandfather saw something in Lathrop, MO. Other people can say a similar story. This was before the Boar War put Lathrop on the map.

There were 2 railroads in Lathrop once, the decision makers (Decision Makers) must have seen something in Lathrop. Then Guyton & Harrington had their heyday, the Decision Makers obviously saw something in Lathrop.


Be Our Guest - The Importance of “Home”
Be Our Guest - The opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Lathrop Publishing.
The Importance of “Home”
by Cayce Mautino
My father grew up in Kearney and my mother grew up in Lathrop. I graduated high school from Lathrop in 2001 but by that point in my life I had lived in five different cities. My dad was a pipeliner and with every promotion we moved to a new location.

Mid way through my high school years my parents divorced and my mom decided the best thing to do was move back home. Heading into my junior year I was unsure of the decision, but it turned out that sometimes moms know what they are talking about. We moved to a place that was familiar to me. I spent summers visiting grandparents in Holt and Turney, and you couldn’t throw a rock without hitting one of my relatives in Lathrop so it became “home.”

After high school I joined the Navy, got married, had a child and of course moved four times in twelve years. On Friday, July 19, 2013 I called my dad and talked about retirement. It is eight years away but my concern has always been to lay down roots somewhere for my daughter to grow up, somewhere to be a staple of a community and grow old. Surprisingly my dad agreed that at some point you have to get off the road and come home. Six hours after that conversation I received a call from my sister letting me know that my dad had a heart attack and passed away.


Be Our Guest - It’s all about perspective
Be Our Guest - The opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Lathrop Publishing.
It’s all about perspective:
I watched this couple eating lunch the other day, I couldn’t keep from watching the lady, she was obviously very ill, you could tell by her color, her fragileness, and the scarf she wore on her head, but it wasn’t the reason I couldn’t stop watching her.

It was her infectious smile that was lighting up the room. They were in deep conversation, enjoying their lunch together, enjoying each other’s company. It didn’t seem to matter to either one of them that there was a sickness involved. Her smile would have said otherwise.

In the background they were playing “Wind Beneath my Wings,” and I thought how ironic!


Post Scripts - Perspective...
What a wonderful week at the Friendship Festival, visiting Daryl Powell at the Cross house, and meeting new business owners.

We have a full paper this week, but I wanted to share this bit from Lori Jordan, a former Lathrop resident.

She does a beautiful job of describing a bittersweet scene, and her experience with it. It touched me deeply as my heart is heavy for those who may be hurting this day.

I was also so moved by Cayce Mautino’s article he asked if he could submit. Yes! Please share! Imagine how delightful it was to read something so beautiful, and how flattered we were to be asked if we would share.

I hope these perspectives on life bless you as well.

Also this week, I had the chance to visit with the owner of Lathrop’s newest business, Flowers to Go. Yes! Lathrop has a flower shop again. The owner is Susan Johnson, and yes, she is a Lathrop resident.


Letters to the Editor - Revival of Kindness
Letters to the Editor: The opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Lathrop Publishing.

Revival of Kindness
Many thanks to all the young men who helped a lady who had backed her rear car wheels over the ledge behind the telephone building Saturday evening, during the festival.


Letters to the Editor - Gracious praise from an artsy fartsy welder
Letters to the Editor: The opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Lathrop Publishing.

Gracious praise from an artsy fartsy welder
Pauli Clariday...Pauli Clariday...Pauli Clariday  What can I say?

I was sitting on the bench in front of Fast Break, heart pounding, flopping the wrinkles out of the newest issue of the Rural Reporter and my Adult Attention Deficit Disorder compelled me to read page two first.   Oh my God, Pauli...if you’re not something!  Tears started to flow. I had to immediately get off the bench and wander, with rapidity, back to my truck with ...pollen, you know...strange stuff, pollen. Tom Allen looked at me in total puzzlement....”pollen”  I told him...”pollen in my eyes....”  It is illegal in Missouri for a 70-year old male to have a public display of emotion.

Pauli, your writing, your accuracy, your photo lay out, your research, your quips, the spirit.... so damned PROFESSIONAL!


Letters to the Editor - Reader enjoyed story, disappointed with festival
Letters to the Editor: The opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Lathrop Publishing.

Reader enjoyed story, disappointed with festival
First of all I just want to thank you for the wonderful article about Jim and Barbara Gerber! Am I surprised about Jim’s new hobby? Not at all! Having set just across the aisle from Jim in our Network Engineering group at AT&T for several years, believe me, there was never a dull moment! He could do anything and something new and interesting was happening just across the aisle all the time. Whatever he was doing, whether it was writing poetry, stories or artsy fartsy network engineering he had me laughing most the day. He is one of the nicest most talented people I have ever met!

Which brings me to my next subject; The Friendship Festival.

I have attended the Friendship Festival for many years. Unfortunately due to a bout with breast cancer I haven’t been for the last two years. Last night my two grand daughters and I went to the festival and WOW, were we ever shocked and disappointed.

First few steps into the festival we were grabbed by window salesman and like to never got loose and then went to buy the arm bands and had to go to a ATM to get cash, no debit cards, so we sneaked back down the alley to dodge the window salesman and went to get cash, sneaked back down the alley to once more avoid the window salesman to get the ride armbands!


Post Scripts: Walk this way...
I have rediscovered a hidden gem in Lathrop. Of course, I’ve kind of been hiding out myself, so maybe we found each other.

The Lathrop Walking Trail at Ben Jones Park, aka soccer fields, is a winding, one-mile trail that took me on a journey over the past 15-20 years.

The trail was empty when I arrived Saturday morning. It was early enough the smell of dew was still in the air. As I ventured out under the arched tree limbs, placed there by an Eagle Scout, I believe, I set out to see how the trail had fared since I’d last been here 3-4 years ago.

At the beginning of the hike, I am reminded of the great growth Lathrop experienced in the late 1990s and early 2000s. The subdivision which backs up to the trail was a welcome addition to Lathrop, which seemed to have not seen development of this scale since the 1970s.

Around the first bend, round hay bales sit, neatly cut and bound. I am reminded we are still country. We are still rural. And we still have some elbow room.

Walking along the first tree line, I hear heavy rustling in the wooded area. Heavy. Probably a deer who is too clever to be seen.


Post Scripts
By Pauli Clariday
Totally cheating this week...

The accident on Hwy 116 that sent Andy Minks to the hospital was a frightening reminder that we must be aware of farm equipment on the highways.

For those of us who have always lived in a rural area, we have been accustomed to watching for the slow moving vehicles... perhaps we could flash our lights at oncoming traffic to warn them they are approaching a farm tractor?

Here are some other good reminders from the Hollis Agricultural Center


Be Our Guest - Open Letter to Governor Jay Nixon: 7/25/13 Edition
The opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Lathrop Publishing.

Open Letter to Governor Jay Nixon
Full Letter appears below (Edited letter printed in 7/25 edition for length)
July 18, 2013

Dear Sir:
Although this is a complex story, I’ll try to keep it short and simple. Effective Friday, June 28th, our Clinton County Prosecutor Bill Burris, resigned. His replacement, whoever it is, should immediately empanel a Grand Jury, which is sorely needed in this mis-managed mess of county government that is now refusing to answer legitimate questions about the security and whereabouts of taxpayer money, directly in violation of the First Amendment to the Constitution. If no one is accountable, and elected officials refuse to answer legitimate questions, withhold information, refuse to be transparent, then the law is indeed being ignored. The people have a right to know, especially if it concerns our money. Where is our “redress of grievances?”

There is no accountability here in Clinton County whatsoever, and the politics in this county have been dominated for decades now by a “good old boy syndrome” that has failed miserably to perform their constitutional duties or fudiciary responsibilities. There has been no economic development in this county. It is a complete dereliction of duty. Virtually everything that happens here is white-washed and swept under the rug, by obvious concerted efforts of past and present Clinton County Commissions, and obvious failure of the local newspapers to name names or print what actually happens in the intimidating halls of the Plattsburg Courthouse.

The leadership of this county has ignored and thusly completely white-washed the findings of the 2006-89 and 2010-104 Missouri State Audits (which were both condemnatory). The 2010 Audit pointed out that virtually nothing had been done to improve the discrepancies in the 2006 Audit, and the money issues have only gotten worse since then.

They have ignored a 1984 Consent Agreement issued by a U.S. District Court against the Clinton County jail. Twenty-nine years later, the jail still has a legal limit of 18 prisoners, while averaging 1,000 arrests per year, and our county spends approximately $250,000 annually to house prisoners elsewhere. The recommendation of the 2007 Jail Advisory Committee to the County Commissioners was completely ignored, and I can prove it. That, too, was an INSULT to every tax-payer in the county, but especially the volunteer citizens who spent many hours of discussion time and research to put the document together.

Dubbed “a financial catastrophe” and “gorilla in the room” by the Commissioners themselves, the jail still remains a serious financial loser, dangerous to both prisoner and jailer, and everybody knows it. In reality, the county government has snubbed its nose for almost three decades at a federal court by neglecting to deal with the jail issue, and told the citizens to go take a hike.

Last year, during the primary election, in order to vote, many citizens, including myself, were forced to go through a metal detector checkpoint at the front door of the Plattsburg Courthouse. I have voted in every Presidential election since 1968, and that’s the first time that has ever happened to me. Who’s afraid of what up there? Are you kidding? The entire security of the courthouse is a joke.

There is a dire need for sworn-oath testimony. Nobody that I know trusts county government for anything. There is no transparency. There’s no accountability, and the buck doesn’t stop anywhere. Unbelievable hypocrisy, double standards, and SECRETS are everywhere. This sounds just like the cesspool in Washington, D.C.

This charade of not answering questions about tax-money is serious. This is not acceptable. Last month, the IRS invokes the Fifth Amendment in a congressional hearing, but here in this county, the good old boy syndrome is even more arrogant. Our Clinton County Collector, Ms. Sharon Cockrum, is saying that she can do whatever she wants with other people’s money, and no questions are to be asked, and this follows in the wake of the eye-popping $92,000 cash found in her office safe on November 30, 2009, as revealed in the 2010 Missouri State Audit. And right now, it appears by the infallible Midwest Stink Test, that taxpayer cash and checks are going through her residence. She does not go into her office at the courthouse to perform her work, but does it all from her home in Lathrop, Missouri. It is thought that Ms. Cockrum has been seen approximately 2 times per year average at the courthouse during the last eight years.

The deputy collectors working in her office have said they are not authorized to deposit any cash or checks into the bank. They said that Ms. Cockrum does that. That leaves a giant gap in the money trail, with no explanation of how the money gets to the bank. As it stands right now, the failure to answer questions about this gap, and the whereabouts of the money, has deteriorated into a theater of the absurd and a mockery of Missouri Sunshine Law. There is absolutely no protection or security for the money. When I spoke with the Missouri State Auditor’s office years ago, they said the 2009 cash discovery was a “BIG RED FLAG.” The 2010 Audit said “significant weaknesses exist in the Collector’s procedures.” That, sir, is an understatement. There are many un-reconciled accounts, as per the audits language, and obvious negligence in taking care of business.

There should never be one penny of cash or personal checks tax-payer monies paid by both corporate and private citizens as payment for their tax debt, to be allowed to go through anyone’s residence. Ms. Cockrum, and all of other elected official who is involved in this banking mess, which continues to this day, are operating above the law and acting as if they have impunity. Who enforces the right to know here?

The Collector’s continued absence is a joke. ALL the departments of the courthouse are aware of this travesty. There are many, many good people who work in the Courthouse, who show up daily to do their business, and who are competent and trustworthy. They, too, know that this is affecting the entire reputation of the building’s political “black cloud” atmosphere, and fostering more dis-trust of government in general.
The county’s Planning & Zoning ordinances have been proclaimed to be un-enforceable by either civil or criminal procedures, and apparently are not worth the paper they are written on. Mitch “Let’s-make-a-deal” Elliott, former Clinton County Prosecutor for approximately 18 years prior to Bill Burris, never once took a case to jury trial during that duration, according to the Clinton County Circuit Clerk’s office. He advised the County Commission several times, to “not get involved in any Planning & Zoning issues.” He told them to not attend the P&Z meetings, and not to make comment. Even though P&Z issues are one of the few real duties of the Commission, they even ignore that.

Attorney Burris made it clear in explaining his resignation. He could no longer afford to keep the job that is classified as a part-time position, but requires much, much more time. And this should be a big warning to the attorney who will replace him. Governor, please, in your decision to name his replacement, consider these statements above. We need a grand jury. We need sworn oath testimony. The attorney who replaces Mr. Burris will need courage to address these serious issues.

I retired in 2005 from the International Union of Elevator Constructors Local 12 in Kansas City, Missouri, serving as the Business Manager for the Local from 2001 to 2005. During that time, our Local went through two Department of Labor audits. If at any time, the DOL would have discovered $92,000 cash in my office safe, I would have been detained immediately, indicted, arraigned, and charged with fraud, embezzlement, corruption, mis-use of union monies, and RICO charges. That’s a fact. In addition, I’m sure, several of my union brothers would have rightfully taken me aside, and candidly asked “What the hell are you doing with our money!” What happens here? NOTHING, not even a blink of the eye.

Shortly after my retirement, I began work as a free-lance reporter at the Clinton County Leader newspaper in Plattsburg, our county seat. I still have a press card, and occasionally write an article for the Lathrop Rural Reporter. In my possession, sir, I have stacks of legal pads containing my notes and research, and a computer full of articles, letters, and other documents of interest directly concerning Clinton County government. I would be more than willing to drive to Jefferson City to discuss these issues with you personally.

Governor, I take my responsibilities seriously. I’m a former U.S. Marine, enlisting at age 17 in 1963, and I’m not afraid of anyone, and I’m not afraid to tell the truth. In fact, what I’ve included in this letter, is only the tip of the iceberg. The pompous, arrogant attitude of some of our elected officials is not tolerable any longer. I can assure you, that many citizens here are not willing to go along with this charade and sham. We need a grand jury, we want our questions fully answered. Please, sir, give us a Prosecutor who will do the right thing.

Thank you for your time and consideration.
Respectfully submitted,

Bernie E. Cassity


Post Scripts - Cities, streets, and sewers
Who says the life of a small town newspaper publisher isn’t exciting?

The first thing I ever learned about when I started writing about city business was sewers. Then I learned about streets.

Almost 20 years later, I’m still writing about sewers and streets.

But I think that perhaps where I am today that I wasn’t so many years ago, is that I’m starting to look at controversies... or even perhaps simply addressing honest, sincere confronting of issues... not so intimidating.

At best, I have always tended to believe everyone does their very best. I have, for the most part, given credit to anyone who has the gumption, dedication, and care to serve on a city or school board, the benefit of the doubt, and would never want to embarrass them. I have always tended to believe things will work out, and there’s no reason for anyone to be offended or to cause offense.

At worst, I avoided problems with public issues for those very reasons. There is more than one side to the story... no one is ever 100% right or 100% wrong... Every one is just doing their best. I should act as a buffer in a volatile situation.


Bits About Em - 7/18/13 Edition
Good Morning,

Hot and hot, this Tuesday, July 16th, and will be the rest of the week, temps reaching into the 90°. But it’s July and almost August. Before we know it the kids will be getting ready for school and we will be starting all over again for the coming of the new year.

I do not have any new prayer request this week, but lets continue to pray for our country and the healing of our land.

Let us first remember to seek God and his Righteousness and All the things shall be added to you.
God Bless, Edith

P.S. Senior Luncheon at the First Assembly of God Church, Friday, July 19th, 11:00am to 1:00pm. All Seniors welcomed!


Post Scripts - Sad and Sickened...
To the point where I want to shut off the ugly, outside world.

There is a disturbing, ominous presence when you have news channel feeds on your Facebook and Twitter accounts. “Push” notifications come streaming your way every time there is a gruesome discovery. Every time there is a shocking and horrible tale.

Every time someone dies.

Drownings, accidents, patricide, fratricide, infanticide and abuse.

Why do they feed this to us? Why do we eat it up?

Why do “I” feel like it’s my job to pass on all the evil and darkness and hate in the world?

Is there even a certain amount that is responsible? Should it be me that makes citizens aware of the bad guys? Of the stupid things that kids get in trouble for?

Of the booking reports? Of the registered sex offenders who live in town?

To some, I would say yes. If you are aware there has been a rash of burglaries or vandalism, would you be a bit more aware?

If our local bank gets robbed (which it has... I ran across that old edition this past weekend), it is good to know who the bad guy was... if they randomly showed up in Lathrop or if they had lived here a while.


Letters to the Editor - 7/4/13 Edition
Community Center generator clarification
Letter to Editor,
Our letter is in regards to the newspaper articles in the June 27, 2013 Rural Reporter and the Clinton County Leader pertaining to the purchase of the emergency generator for the Goppert Community Center in Lathrop. We would like to correct the information in the articles stating the cost of the generator.

The actual cost to the Lathrop taxpayers for the generator is $7,500. The installation of the generator will complete the main upgrades to the Goppert Community Center as proposed by the Shelter Committee of which we are members. We would like to thank the Goppert Foundation for donating the cost of the installation. This generator will be a great asset to the Lathrop community in emergency situations.

Thank you to all who have been involved in this project.
Karen Stout
Becky Lytle



Quality of school facilities are important
Dear Editor,
Last year, Kearney High School installed all-weather turf on the stadium field. I was fortunate enough to have been the largest donor of the project.

When the editor of the Kearney paper asked me why I made such a generous donation toward what some might consider a “frivolous” luxury, I told him this:

I firmly believe the quality of the folks that choose to settle in our community varies in direct proportion to the quality of the facilities we have to offer.
Mack Porter
Kearney, MO

Editor’s Note: Quality schools and facilities have been key to Kearney’s success. The community supports them and continues to grow because of what they offer families and their children.

Lathrop continues to gain support from a very strong core of young families who are supportive with both their time and energy. I hope to see the same generosity from citizens in Lathrop when the time comes.


Post Scripts - The End of an Era
June 2013 will mark in my memory the end of two very important eras in Lathrop. Both of these businesses... and the faces associated with them we have become so familiar with... have greeted us for the last time.

While the Lathrop Telephone Company will continue with its service, and we will all continue to be Lathrop Telephone customers, Jean and Jane will be happily enjoying their retirements and their families.

And as for Les and Bev Bowles, their story is bittersweet to me. Sweet, because like Les said, “It’s been a great ride,” and there are no regrets. Bitter, because like so many times, we simply don’t like to see change.

I was most impressed with his positive outlook on technology, and the rapidly changing world we live in.


Post Scripts - Let’s hear it for Gen Y
By Pauli Clariday

Or you can call them Millennials. I am talking about the generation that is just now in their early 30s. Rounding it off, let’s just say those born after 1980, and into the mid to late 1990s. Some place the Millennials back to the late 70s, but to me, I think that gets a bit into the tail end of Gen X.

I was born in 1965. Most accounts of the Baby Boomers put them from 1946 to 1964. I like to think of myself as Gen X... a bit more cynical, pragmatic, and distrusting of the world that our Baby Boomer parents portrayed.

I wasn’t a “latch-key” kid, as Gen X is typically described...but I grew up with the dark, depressing 70s as the back drop of how the world was destined to look. I grew up at the tail-end of the Vietnam War, hippies, inflation rates in the 20s, gas shortages, and an Iranian hostage crisis.

The first national tragedy that made me stop and realize I was not the center of the universe was Challenger. Atari and Star Wars was the realization that “Lost in Space” and “The Jetsons” were actually going to happen.


Letters to the Editor - Reader believes investment in schools gives best returns
The opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Lathrop Publishing.

Dear Editor,
Great article on the schools finance decisions. I couldn’t agree more that the schools sporting venues are not only outdated but nearly obsolete. The community made a great decision in building the new high school. The time is now to equip that great facility with a equally great sports complex. No one likes to pay more taxes but I believe as a community we could not ask for any better return on our investment. This project would not only benefit our growing number of students but put a spotlight on a community that is ready to grow and bloom to its fullest potential.
-Mark McFarland
Lathrop, MO


Post Scripts - Here we are... warts and all
Lathrop City Council has been through the proverbial wringer the last couple of weeks. The underlying rumble of discontent had a big spotlight shined on it, and whatever I may have thought could be glazed over or ignored, has been aired out in the open.

As I sat in City Council tonight and listened to former police chief Leonard Eads unleash his frustration about the events leading to his early retirement a year ago, I felt bad.

I felt bad because I knew that’ how he felt a year ago... and I didn’t do anything about it.

I didn’t understand where the “intrusions” he was sensing were coming from... but I sat in a city council meeting a year ago and caught the questioning, growing list of demands, and two parties in a struggle that were both about to the end of their rope.

I have observed questioning from intelligent, educated, and passionate elected officials when I couldn’t understand why the individual concerns hadn’t already been addressed in individual conversations.


Post Scripts - After all these years...Club is still running on steam


Well, I’m not sure exactly what I meant by that. Running on steam might be great, as long as you’re not running out of steam.

Steam, as you know, powered some of our country’s greatest early machines. Locomotives, tractors, turbines and boilers. It was key to our country’s industrial revolution.

I’m not going to pretend I know any more about them than that. But I will tell you about my sneak peek tour of the Antique Show Grounds today.

Mika called us to catch a picture of the beautiful display of flags that line 33 Hwy along the Show Grounds property. As drove into the grounds, I saw the familiar sight of Jim Plowman’s old truck driving through to the back.

I knew if I caught him, I could get the whole story.

Now, sometimes I surprise myself at how scattered I can be. When I find myself juggling a day job, community efforts, a home, family, husband, college kids, and a newspaper to boot, quite honestly, I sometimes forget where I am.

Or what day it is.

Or that only one of the biggest events of the year for Lathrop is getting ready to take place!

Jim, in all his graciousness, laughed it off with me, when the lights finally went on as to why all the activity was taking place.

Then I didn’t feel so bad because he was eager to show me their newest additions.

Now, I remember when the Antique Car Show was still downtown during the Friendship Festival. And I remember when they cleared Center Street to bring the humongous, steeple-less 1890’s Osborn Church to the Show Grounds.

And I remember when they carefully de- and then re- constructed the 1800s log home from Barnesville. And I remember the tremendous TLC that went into the restoration of the One Room School.

So I, probably in my naive assumption that all things should be pure and vintage, became a bit of a elitist in thinking that all buildings at the Show Grounds should be vintage and moved great distances just to create this little utopia of history we can call our own.

I wasn’t sure about the new structures...

But Jim took me to the newest addition on the south edge of the Show Grounds... in the recreation of the early 20th century town... the Barber Shop and the Post Office.

Oh. My. Gosh.

The rough-hewn batten siding of the building was warm and welcoming. The barber pole on the outside that would have been a staple to Main Street USA in the 1950s, is treasured and proudly displayed. And the vintage letter drop box came straight from the Andy Griffith Show.

As we passed through the doorway of the barber shop, Jim couldn’t have been any more proud of the display of antique barbery if he were showing off pictures and creations of grandchildren.

Wall-length mirrors that were carefully saved and restored from Lathrop history. Chairs that were collected from across the country and carefully restored to their original grandeur and luxury.

Tonics and oils, creams and conditioners. Razors and brushes. Powders and potions. All lining the shelves that remind you of the way your grandfather used to smell.

Around the room, I get the stories behind each major artifact; each framed historical document; and the affection and care put into this labor of love.

How very, very fortunate we are to have people in our very community... with our very heritage... treasure and preserve our history. How incredibly blessed we are to have pieces of our town that had outlived their functional usefulness... find their way to this ultimate “retirement home” of society.

Adjoining the Barber Shop is the Post Office.

And not just any post office. It is the Lathrop Post Office. Long before our present day memories (mine go back as far as Tommy Williams), postmasters and carriers were the sole, trusted carriers of our critical and precious messages.

In a day when emails, text messages, and video chatting captures more vividly and more completely than any other time in history, nothing gave us as much pleasure as receiving a hand-written note from a loved one far away.

As I looked at the handwritten names on the back of post boxes, I saw names that I remember from Lathrop’s history. Names that once had large farms, or ran successful businesses, or did great things.

Make sure you go to the Show Grounds this weekend. Don’t just look, nod, and walk past. Don’t just think you’ve seen everything already. Look. Really look. This is our history. It is precious. It is fleeting. And without this wonderful place, it would be gone forever.


Faux Farms - Of Fathers and Mothers
I know I’ve told you about my mother, but books could be written about her and I have only this simple column. Mothers are on my mind at the moment, but with Father’s Day coming up it’s only fair to make this particular piece parental, patriarchal as well as matriarchal.

The earliest memories I have of my mother are story book. Her great comfort given during chronic and agonizing ear infections, seeing her face when I came out of surgery at the age of 6 to have my adenoids removed, her kindness and compassion and yes even her terrible Texas temper. Her accent would kick in and you knew the fine china was about to fly. But the most amazing thing about my mother I didn’t learn until just this last March, over a decade after her tragic and untimely death on an icy road.

For most of my Christian life I was little more than a “pew package”. Sometimes participating in the doings and trappings of the church, occasionally in the actual work (spreading the gospel) and at times with my back turned flat to the Author of All Good Things; my most miserable years. When I was in grade school I snuck into the girl’s bathroom when no one was around, just to see what it was like. It was, of course, just a school bathroom minus the urinals. But what amazed me was that the graffiti on the bathroom walls far exceeded in wretched humor that to be found in the boy’s stalls. It works like this: girls are sweet, and like apples when they go rotten they really go rotten (whereas boys were kind of born that way). Human beings are much the same way; designed to be good and decent and loving. Christianity can and should enhance this, but when a Christian goes bad -as I certainly did – they can be and often are far worse than any atheist or agnostic you’d pluck off the street. Especially in some of the more legalist circles, I’ve personally witnessed such hatred and vileness that it would make Buddha roll over in his grave.


Post Scripts - Words are powerful things...
By Pauli Clariday
I have to tip my hat to Brett... he called the last city council meeting, and the frustrating undercurrent of unease, mistrust, and lack of communication, as he saw it. He called it micromanagement and ineffective.

I, unfortunately, (fortunately?), could not bring myself to sit through another 3+ hour meeting on a Tuesday night, when I have far too many other parts and pieces to put together for the week’s issue.

And I feel bad. I feel bad because I wasn’t there so I could pass along the decisions and (any constructive) debate. But mostly I feel bad because this situation reminds me of too many conflicts in the past, where, honestly, the simple solution isn’t so simple.

And I feel bad, because words hurt.

Elected officials aren’t just members of the general public. Ask any libel attorney, and they will want to know just how “public” an alleged target has made themself. You don’t get much more public than running for an elected office and making decisions with taxpayer moneys. Our elected officials should be held to the highest degree of accountability, and we, the public, have the right, and the privilege, to question their service.

But here’s where I get stuck... and here’s where maybe I just don’t have that “killer, journalism instinct.”

These are volunteers. City council, mayor, school board members. They don’t receive a dime for the time they spend serving the constituency. In my 18 years of watching and covering local government, I would say with confidence more than 90% of those elected at the polls (for city or school seats), made that decision to serve because they cared. Not to say that the same percentage didn’t have some sort of an agenda, or a particular passion, but why would anyone choose this path if they didn’t care about something deeply?


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms: Farmville's End Game
By S. Daily Warren


In case you haven’t heard by now, the farm part of Faux Farms is sitting on the garage sale table and we’re just left with the “faux”. So step right up, haggler, and get some dealing done. With my beloved column amounting to no more than a running infomercial, let’s see what we got for sale this weekend, June 8th & 9th at 1221 NE Pulliam Road, about 1 mile NE of the TRex Mart on 116, and weather does not affect a barn sale! Everything goes but the barn…unless you buy the house with it.

We have everything. Buckets and feeders and egg incubators (chicken, not human – there’s no cloning at Faux Farms). There’s tie-down straps and bungee cords, shovels and hoes and axes to grind. Fence posts and PVC piping, and tools of every kind which are very much like a surplus rifle from the French army – never fired and only dropped once. There’s even something called a Spinny Ginny, which I always thought was this Irish dancer I met at…well, never mind.


Letters to the Editor: Enjoying the Mules!
The opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Lathrop Publishing.

Hi Pauli,
Great article on Jack Henry and his Mules. You answered a lot of questions I had, but did not take the time to stop him and visit. I see him and his mules at the “Hungry Mule” and on the streets and I think how neat it is to have something like that here in town.

I really like it when he hitches the mules to one of the implements he has and drives around town. It reminds people of the changes in time on how farming was done back in the day and the way it is now. Also it makes me think of what it may have been like around town in the glory days when Lathrop was the Mule Capitol of the world, only with several thousand mules roaming the streets instead of just two.

Not too long ago I was on my way into City Hall through the back door and Mr. Henry pulled his team into the alley. He tied the team to a pole right next to the “Rustic Mule” and went to city hall to take care of business.

I hope Mr. Henry continues to “cruise town” with his team. It may not seem like he is drawing much attention, but a lot of people, myself included, really enjoy it. I hope to see Mr. Henry, Jack and Henry at the antique show in June and again the fall show in October, I’m sure he will be a big hit with the area school kids, especially the schools from the bigger cities.

Dwight Adkison


Post Scripts - Enter... The Fourth Generation
By Pauli Clariday

As we move full steam ahead into our 18th year of publication, it is hard to imagine our life before The Lathrop News. My now-adult children were 7, 5, and 3. I was a much-younger 30 years old, and I had no clue what the heck I was getting into.

Today, as most of you know, I tend to my “day job” while Mom (Norma) and Grandma (Edith) take care of the day-to-day and keep things running.

I know you wouldn’t be sitting there reading this right now if it weren’t for Mom and Grandma. So many times, it just seemed too hard... too uphill... just... too... damn.... hard!

I know I’m not alone if I talk about getting burned out on something. We have probably all experienced that feeling.

If you’re burned out on a job, you find a different one. If you’re burned out on school, you take a break.

But when you get burned out on something that you really know God placed in your lap to serve the people... well... you just wait to see what happens. Perhaps doors will open... perhaps doors will close....

Or perhaps God kindles the flame that has laid dormant in your heart and gifts you with amazing people in your family who believe there is a purpose and a calling to that thing which you have started.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms - Of Faith and Fallacy
So I was talking to a shrink the other day (don’t all good columns start this way?),and before the rumors start flying I do not pay for this honor; she’s a friend and I’ve known her for some time. What I didn’t know, and what came up in the conversation about a recent life-changing event for me that can only be described as “transforming”, was that she was an atheist.

Now understand that this is a medical doctor of the mind who has spent nearly as much time in college as I have in journalism. And she’s no quack, but a woman of wisdom and intellect. But having cut her eye teeth on about six different versions of Christianity as a child and young adult, at some point she said “enough” and turned to academia for her belief system. I don’t share that system, but my own faith compels me to respect her free will and choices, so I didn’t thump her on the head with my Bible but only grazed her slightly across the temple.

But it allowed me to apply a phrase I coined long ago, and should probably copyright as I’m quite proud of it. As she sipped her espresso and calmly proclaimed that there’s no real God but only human belief systems that create religions in the interest of species survival and progress, I laid it on her.

“I don’t believe in atheists,” I said quietly.

The cup stopped halfway to her mouth. Her eyes blinked rapidly for a moment like a supercomputer processing troubling data. Then she broke out laughing, because taken superficially it is a pretty good joke…only I wasn’t kidding. I went on and explained my position.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms: Busted Bubbles
Well, sports fans, we sold our alpacas the other day. I was devastated, beside myself with grief, inconsolable. Actually, I shed nary a tear and they’re already happily making themselves at home a scant 8 miles away where they will undoubtedly continue to rule the roost and maintain their impeccable (but deceptive) image as queens of the farm.

I’m not as cold-hearted as I sound; they are the most utterly charming creatures and I wouldn’t trade the personality of one for a hundred goats, but then again I wouldn’t trade a stick of used chewing gum for a hundred goats either. The sheep are still doing their duty as lawn mowers but I must admit, it’s a little lonely on the place without these prima donnas prancing and pronking like they’re the most valuable animal God created since the cat with no attitude or the self-skinning buffalo. It was sad to see them go, but they went to a fine home where the ladies (at least some of them) don’t eat meat and the dame of the household hates pulling trailers as much as I do. Certainly a kindred spirit, but not as quick as some of the ladies I’m used to. As she was pulling away I hailed her down and yelled from across the front lawn that I’d like to say good-bye. She misunderstood, and as I walked over to the trailer to bid farewell to Mona Lena and Maggie Moo and all the rest, the nice lady-buyer thought I was talking to her, waved good-bye and drove away.


Post Scripts: Sometimes a community, just need a Kick Start
And no, I’m not talking about coffee... or a Pepsi... or whatever your caffeine of choice is.

Actually, I’m talking about a new phenomenon called “crowdfunding”.

Stay with me here.

Your Mark Zuckerbergs and Steve Jobs may have gone out in the world and found people willing to invest millions of dollars into their ideas. In the Golden Years of Silicon Valley, venture capitalists were looking for the hottest new feature, techy-toy, and world-changing idea to turn around for a huge return on their investment.

But what about us little guys? What about the idea... or the book... or the album... or the artwork we would like to create?

What about a historic building that is about to be torn down and its only hope of salvation is $850,000 for restoration and private ownership?

This ever-elusive idea of finding money laying around might just be a reality.

If you’re savvy with social media and promotion... if you have a good idea... and if you can find enough people across the world of crowdfunding to believe in your project and donate small amounts, it’s happening every day.

“Crowdfunding”... the concept doesn’t sound too far from the entrepreneurial middle schooler who seeks “investors” for her hot, fashionable friendship bracelets in exchange for the first designs out the chute.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms: Feelings
by S. Daily Warren

“Fee-wings, nuttin’ more ‘dan fee-wings, trying to forgot those…fee-wings of luuuuuuv”
I certainly don’t want to offend anyone who fell in love to that song or think it a work of lyrical genius…but what a load of bull! Let me tell you all about feelings.

Trouble, with a capital “T”.

If western civilization has a fatal flaw, if there’s one word that can describe every personal disaster on a scale ranging from the individual to the national, it’s feelings. Here’s an exercise, a riddle of sorts, and an easy one. See if you can come up with the one word that intrinsically ties together all of the terrible things listed below:

Alcoholism, substance abuse, child abuse, physical abuse, depression, anxiety, suicide, physical violence, rage, jealousy, warfare, self-harm, domestic violence, sexual perversion, theft, adultery…the list goes on and on.

Everything from the national “mood” after 9/11 that led us to pulverize a sovereign nation that probably had little or nothing to do with the attack to a 16 year old Canadian girl who hung herself because some bunch of jerks utterly humiliated her publicly on Facebook are based on feelings. It’s not feelings that are bad in and of themselves; it’s being governed by them – mastered by them – that can and often does lead to utter disaster. To quote my newest favorite author, the recently deceased Dallas Willard, “Feelings are, with few exceptions, good servants. But they are disastrous masters.”


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms: Fatal (trans) Formation
by S. Daily Warren

“Physician….hate thyself!”

Worst advice ever, right there. Now that the April Ice Age has ended in Clinton County and the morels are rearing their little heads, now that the impossible May snows have (hopefully) stopped we can all give thanks and do what any good agrarian does: pray for hay. Much like the joke about the Catholic priest who showed up in heaven weeping because in his Bible he had misread “celebrate” as “celibate” (I stole that from Vic Davis), I must make another less funny joke about my own demise.

The Missouri-born Spencer Warren is under the corn and I ask you not to mourn. Good riddance. The opening line about the physician hating himself could easily be the story of my life. College educated, sailor of 4 of the 7 seas, fluent In the profanity of 5 different languages, this column was never called “Faux Farms” for nothing. No farmer am I, having presided over the deaths of more chickens than Colonel Sanders. But I am a writer, and happy and proud of my gift, privileged to use it in the service of the good people of Lathrop and Clinton County.

But here’s something you may not know about me. Few do. For most of my life I have hated my own guts (those who do know me are smiling but I ask you to remain respectfully silent!). That makes me something of a Faux Fraud, if you’ll pardon the double entendre. Look past the nice clothes, the charming talk, the devastatingly good looks and scintillating intellect and inside you would have found (past tense) self-loathing. But don’t cry for me, Argentina; I’ve turned the corner.


Post Scripts: Of Public Service and Private Matters...
By Pauli Clariday

I have found myself in more than one interesting conversation this week about public service; one with a school board member, and one with... well, probably just myself.

I was reminded on Sunday, during this conversation, why there are just certain subjects that have given me a perpetual headache from banging my head against the wall.

Public schools: Here’s my take.

It is designed, in its big blob of bureaucracy, conflicting power struggles, and tax-payer funding, to be difficult. I can’t say “designed to fail” because that would mean there’s no hope. I believe there is hope, I just believe that success and efficiency are designed right out of the system.

I’m not just saying this from the conclusions I have drawn. I watched a documentary about public schools (right-and I stayed at a Holiday Inn, too!) and they interviewed a gentleman in his early 60s. He graduated high school from the Bronx, or some economically impoverished urban area... broke away from the poverty and graduated from college to be a teacher. Growing up, he saw everything that was wrong with the system. He vowed to enter back in the education and have everything fixed within the first five years of his career.

Forty years later, he’s still trying to fix it.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms: For Love of Lathrop
by S. Daily Warren
Anyone remember the vice-presidential debate between Dan Quayle and Lloyd Bentsen, the one where Quayle froze like a deer in the headlights and looked like he really, really wanted to disappear? Quayle was young and handsome, Bentsen was older and…well, let’s just say more stately. But there was that line, that devastating line where Quayle shriveled up like a prune into dust and simply blew away. The line was: “I knew Jack Kennedy, and you’re no Jack Kennedy”. Blew him away, game over.

If I had a valid point, and I seldom do, it would be that Bill Burris is both men. A good-looking fellow, but also stately. Mature and articulate, but also possessed of something fresh and almost innocent. I say “almost” because he is, after all, a lawyer. And like in the debate there are times when he can blow you away with a one-liner, powerfully delivered and concise. Not being a mud-slinger, there are other times when he stands his ground, takes his licks, then quietly and without fuss pulls up his tent stakes and moves on. But the debate analogy ends there because Lloyd Bentsen went on to become President Clinton’s Secretary of the Treasury and I think Dan Quayle makes commercials for Fruit of the Loom underwear.

And I think if both men had been one, their qualities merged like some strange PhotoShop collage, then a great president might have been forged. Instead we ended up with a fusspot on one hand (may he rest in peace) and an idiot on the other (may Dan’s career rest in pieces).

I like Bill Burris. I know Bill Burris. And, folks, I’m here to tell you…I’m no Bill Burris.


Be Our Guest: Who’s following the money, and who’s asking the hard questions?
The opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Lathrop Publishing.

By Bernie Cassity

The answers gleaned from some of the county’s elected officials concerning recent questions about the security of the taxpayer’s money, can now be officially filed in the ever-thickening “whitewash” packet stored somewhere in the Plattsburg Courthouse. It’s no big deal, just another ho-hum boring glitch of information that doesn’t mean anything, like the past two Missouri State audits for our third-class county, which have been ignored. Here’s the responses from a February 2013 certified letter sent to County Collector Sharon Cockrum, the County Commissioner’s, and Prosecutor Bill Burris, asking about the county’s cash and checks.

Collector Sharon Cockrum, zero. No response of any kind.

Presiding Commissioner Wade Wilken, “we have no iron in the fire.”

Prosecutor Burris will not ask Presiding Judge Tom Chapman of the 43rd Judicial Circuit to impanel a grand jury. No subpoena will be issued to Bank Liberty to find out who actually makes deposits and when. So far, he sees no “crime” committed.

The whereabouts and security concerning the taxpayer’s money has been in question for many years now, highlighted by the State of Missouri’s audit in November, 2009, when $92,000 cash was discovered in the County Collector’s office.


Letters to the Editor - Teacher overwhelmed by support of community
The opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Lathrop Publishing.

Teacher overwhelmed by support of community

To the Lathrop R-II School District and the Lathrop community,

I want to take this opportunity to thank you for all the generosity and support you have given me during the twenty-eight years I have taught in Lathrop, and especially during the past couple of months as I have been fighting my cancer.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms - Sermonizing Soapbox
Gay marriage, now here’s a mess waiting to happen. And as my best friend always said on sensitive issues, “not that there’s anything wrong with that”. I’m speaking of the civil union of same-sex couples under the law, and if you’ll pardon the expression it’s an issue I would not touch with a ten-foot pole. But someone recently gave me an insider’s Christian perspective that demanded attention, so here goes.

There are 7 mentions of homosexual acts in the Bible, and none of them seem deliriously happy about the subject. 2 refer to rape, 1 refers to prostitution and pederasty and 4 are non-specific. Jesus Christ doesn’t directly address it, but He does refer to sexual immorality in general and many believe that our Lord lumped in gay behavior with everything from joining N.A.M.B.L.A. to looking at a Victoria’s Secret catalog. In short, the Bible is brief on the subject and speaks more harshly and commonly about the misuse of money.

What about the law? As of this year, 11 nations have laws supporting the civil union of same-sex couples, including the United States with 9 states that support it as legal and a handful of others who recognize gay marriages from other jurisdictions. For instance, California does not have laws on the books as of yet (but the night is young!) but will recognize same-sex marriages officiated in, say, Massachusetts. On the other side of the spectrum, a political map almost exactly mirrors the red state/blue state voting tallies from the last 2 presidential elections. Much of the Midwest and the South have laws on the books directly opposing gay marriage. Missouri, for instance, even added a preventative clause to the state constitution, the first to do so.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms - Let's talk Texas
Let me tell you about Texas. It’s big. Really, really big. You know that big thing you saw that one time? Much bigger than that. Texas is so big (how big IS it, Johnny Carson’s audience queried) that it has it’s own power grid. No kidding. When it comes to all the electrical energy produced and consumed in the United States you have three different categories; east, west and Texas.

A man couldn’t ask for better than what I have today. What some folk would consider a curse of a personal nature, God has turned into a blessing. Having a full-time job here in the Lone Star State I naturally had to open a bank account, and what do I find? Chase Bank has umpteen special discounts for military members, even Faux Fighters such as myself whose only claim to fame is being in the Coast Guard Auxiliary, which is the equivalent of volunteer work but without any boot camp or any real effort. But the military ID netted me a special rewards credit card, free checking and saving and even a free safety deposit box where I keep memorabilia from Lathrop like the silk tie Vic Davis threw away because of an irritating gravy stain.


Letters to the Editor: Another Letter in support of LHS Math Teacher Mrs. Michelle Irby
The opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Lathrop Publishing.
Another Letter in support of LHS Math Teacher Mrs. Michelle Irby
Dear Editor
I am writing this letter to the editor as a red flag and concern for the state of education in Lathrop. Recently, Mrs. Irby, a math teacher in the Lathrop School District was fired. The action of the school district to fire Mrs. Irby is most likely a career ender for her. Most other school districts will not even consider hiring Mrs. Irby because she was fired. Her life as a teacher is over. All it took was one vote not to renew her contract without considering options like allowing her to resign. What a sad statement from the board who say their mission is “Educating every student, every day using high expectations, rigor, relevance and relationships to achieve excellence!” and has a vision that “Lathrop R-II students will score in the top ten of all schools in the state in all areas of student performance.” You have had a chance to read from her own students in their letter to the editor of how she lived these words. But why is this important?

The Common Cores State Standards are bringing big, big changes to education across this country. It is a requirement and is part of the district’s plan which is reflected in their Mission Statement and Vision statements. What is now missing is a teacher with the knowledge and training to help the district come into compliance with these new requirements. How knowledgeable is Mrs. Irby? She is representing the State of Missouri at an upcoming national conference on these changes. Not only that, she is a presenter. She also facilitates a graduate class for teachers at Missouri Western State University on Content Area Literacy which comply with the new reading and writing requirements of the Common Core in ALL content areas. Her upcoming task in Lathrop was to train the staff so the district can meet the new standards. And what she did in the classroom directly reflects what every teacher will have to do to meet these new requirements. Now, because of the actions of the Lathrop School Board, her teaching career is over and the district is left lacking a highly trained staff member with the hands on experience it will take to train other staff members and achieve their new mission.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms: Far Reaches
When in doubt, go to Texas!
There’s really no cure for the country blues like a motorcycle ride through the Texas Hill Country. It soothes the soul in a way like no other place I know. I’m fortunate enough – among my many blessings – to have the best big brother in the world. Always an anchor in our family, he’s been a civil engineer for various firms for decades now and when I told him about my spiritual malaise he had just the ticket. So together we set off from Dallas (I put the Harley on a trailer to get it out of Missouri’s winter weather) into the very depths of the heart of Texas, a rolling escarpment of hills and small mountains that is a jewel beyond description. On our 1000 mile ride we’ve seen antelope and elk, white-tailed deer and bison, even the occasional wild boar. Truly magical.

But as always, I managed to get into trouble. My big brother’s something of a big-shot, you see, although he’s grounded with a common man’s sensibilities and has a faith without peer. In his ceaseless travels on the corporate dime he has accumulated “points” at every swanky hotel you can imagine, of which I was happy to avail myself. So here I sit in the capitol city of Austin in a posh hotel, my travel-stained jeans that haven’t been washed in 5 days of wear and my hiking boots that probably still have some of the “mud” from our farm clinging to them, right down to my suspenders. And as we rode our dusty bikes into the multi-storied parking garage the continuous blap-blap-blap of my Harley-Davidson was setting off the car alarms of various Jaguar’s and Mercedes Benz’s, but that’s just the way things are in Texas where the rich often rub elbows with the poor and all peoples are just “folks” when you boil it down.

Of course we had to see the Alamo, and being a 6th generation Texan (though technically born in Missouri) I have to admit to getting a little choked up at the fateful destiny of Davie Crockett and Jim Bowie as they forged a nation and then an American state with the sacrifice of their own blood. A marvelous place, Texas. Goats and sheep dot the landscape of the hill country and I amused myself going down the country roads by gunning the throttle of the Harley at those unfortunate animals grazing too near the fence bordering the highway. They would scatter in a panic, and I was cheerfully berated for my “cruelty” until I explained that I was hoping to come across the famous Fainting Goats I’ve heard about. Nothing could have topped off this adventure better than to gun the bike’s big engine and watch those goofy goats plop down in their macabre imitation of death, but in this I was disappointed. Maybe next year.


Post Scripts: Of equality and American Freedom....and my coming out
I am going to venture into a topic that I would have never thought of tackling 10 years ago. I’m a different person than I was 10 years ago... and I think I like how I’ve grown.

For those who have known me a long time, you know my spiritual background. I moved to Lathrop because of my church... my rebirth, if you will... from someone who truly was dead to the things of God. Not that I didn’t believe, but I was smothered in all sorts of destructive behaviors and thinking.

Being born again was the single thing that saved my life. Literally. To know I had a God that loved me, sacrificed for me, and gave me new beginning. I am forever, eternally grateful for that grace... and the grace that has abounded in my life for some 25 years.

The very fundamental, Bible-based teaching I was fortunate to have--let’s say realigned my perspective. I never considered myself immoral... just maybe amoral. It was good to have Bible truth... Holy Spirit conviction... and a clear sense of right and wrong. It has been through that clarity that I have made my way through this second one-third of my life... and I wouldn’t change a thing.

Consequently, along with the evangelical, fundamentalist belief system, my politics followed.


Letters to the Editor:
The opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Lathrop Publishing.

Students express support for non-renewed teacher
Dear Editor,
It has come to our attention that Mrs. Michele Irby did not have her contract renewed by the Lathrop RII School Board. Of course not being tenured makes it much easier to get rid of a teacher. Knowing only one side of the two-part story allows for uneducated thoughts, actions and words to be said and done. The Lathrop RII School Board arrived at their conclusion to not keep Mrs. Irby, however several students, parents and teachers wonder if they made the right decision with the best interests of the students in mind.

There is a “Plan A” teacher and a “Plan B” teacher who teaches as a back-up plan. Mrs. Irby is a Plan A teacher born and bred to teach. She teaches Geometry, Algebra II, and College Algebra, and she has not let the kids down educationally. From the kids she has had, her state test scores have never gone down. Countless times she has had recommendations from principals and superintendents to renew her contract the next year, as she had this past decision making period. So answer this, has she ever had a bad review?

Any student with a math or grading question can ask Irby without judgment or harassment. If you need her to slow down in class, all you have to do is ask. Before and after school, tutoring is a common occurrence with this unselfish teacher. Did she have parent complaints? If so, were they discussed with her?


Letters to the Editor:
The opinions expressed in the letters to the Editor do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Lathrop Publishing.

Thank you Norma, Pauli, and the Rural Reporter for the article and pictures of my retirement celebration.

It was a wonderful day to cap off 38 years of ministry around the Gower community. I will always cherish the memories, friendships, love and support. And I pray for the guidance of the Holy Spirit as the Gower Christian Church calls an interim and eventually a new pastor.
Bob Elliott


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms - The Unjust Judge
“There was in a city a judge, which feared not God, neither regarded man: And there was a widow in that city; and she came unto him, saying, Avenge me of mine adversary. And he would not for a while: afterward he said within himself, Though I fear not God, nor regard man; Yet because this widow troubleth me, I will avenge her, lest by her continual coming she weary me. And the Lord said, Hear what the unjust judge saith.” Luke 18:2-6
I have the highest respect for authority. I believe they are placed by God himself and, much like the judge in this parable, end up serving His purpose in the long run in any event. I’ve always wanted to hear the sequel to this passage, about how the judge not only did the right thing but found his way on the path of righteousness. I’d like to think the judge got saved.
I love my home here in Clinton County. It’s one of the few places where I seamlessly found my place. And in spite of the putrid squalor that is my writing desk, I like my home to be clean. As a reporter, many people come to me and say “Hey, you should do something about such-n-such” and when I can do something I usually do. The problem is that most writers are basket cases, moving from one dramatic moment to another and hopefully not leaving a trail of wreckage behind them. So what strikes me as a fabulous crusade for truth, justice and the American way on one day might escape my short-term memory in the next.


Letters to the Editor - 3/21/13 Edition
The opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Lathrop Publishing.

Only My Opinion
Many times I hear people complain about something they don’t like i.e.: National Healthcare, gun control, or lack of physical and monetary responsibility of the school board, as examples. When asked, “Did you go vote?” they ususally reply “no, it doesn’t make any difference.” Well, it does make a difference. Just look at our last primary election for Clinton County Commissioner’s race that was decided by only one vote between two candidates.
It will soon be time to elect two people to serve as our board of directors for Lathrop Schools and your responsibility to vote for the two best candidates suited for the job. We should remember it is just that, a board to direct the business of Lathrop Schools. Candidates should be chosen based on their ability to direct and supervise the operation and long run financial stability of the district.
They need to have experience in money management to protect us from having payments due that have not been planned for, thus requiring patrons to continually be burdened with a tax increase. They need the ability to keep our annual reserves at a safe level and to develop short range plans that can be administered by the personnel with clear cut understanding of who is responsible.
A position on the board of directors is a management, not a teaching position.
Ed Shrewsbury, Lathrop Resident


Test Run of Accu-Vote tabulation machine to be held
A test run of the Accu-Vote tabulating machine with sample ballots for the upcoming April 2, 2013 General Municipal Election will be held March 29, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. in the office of Mary Blanton, Clinton County Clerk.
Any person wishing to attend will be welcome.


Conservation Comments: Undercover poaching investigation pays off
Vince Crawford
Conservation Agent
Known as the “Paddlefish Capital of the World,” Warsaw, Missouri, is a favorite area for many of Missouri’s approximately 16,000 sport paddlefish snaggers because of its location along the Osage River. Agents with the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) discovered that the Warsaw area is also a favorite location for paddlefish poachers.
A cooperative undercover investigation by the two agencies recently resulted in more than 100 suspects from Missouri and eight other states being issued citations and/or arrest warrants for state and federal crimes related to paddlefish poaching.
Missouri’s official state aquatic animal, paddlefish are an ancient species. Also called spoonbills, they can grow up to seven-feet long and weigh 160 pounds or more. Paddlefish are valued as a sport fish for both their size, and for eating. Paddlefish are also valued for their eggs, or roe, which are eaten as caviar.
The section of the Osage River running along Warsaw in Benton County is a paddlefish hot spot because it is blocked upstream by Truman Dam. When spawning paddlefish reach the dam, their route is blocked and their numbers increase dramatically. This dramatically increases sport anglers’ chances of snagging the big fish with a random jerk on a fishing line equipped with large hooks.
This concentration of female paddlefish laden with eggs also makes Warsaw a prime location for paddlefish poachers to get the fish eggs for national and international illegal caviar markets.
“The national and international popularity of Missouri paddlefish eggs as a source of caviar has grown dramatically in recent years,” said MDC Protection Chief Larry Yamnitz. “This is a result of European sources of caviar having declined from overfishing of the Caspian Sea’s once plentiful and lucrative beluga sturgeon, another species of fish known for its caviar.”
Caviar is a delicacy created by preserving fish roe in special salts. According to MDC, about 20 pounds of eggs or more can be harvested from a large, pregnant female paddlefish. Retail prices for paddlefish caviar vary. A current common retail price is about $35 per ounce.
“Caviar prices in illegal or black markets also vary,” Yamnitz said. “A common black-market price is about $13 an ounce. Therefore, a single large female paddlefish with about 20 pounds of eggs is carrying about $4,000 worth of potential caviar for black market sales.”
Over the course of March 13 and 14, approximately 85 conservation agents of the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC), 40 special agents of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USWFS), and wildlife officers from other states contacted more than 100 suspects in Missouri and eight other states to issue citations, execute arrest warrants, conduct interviews and gather additional information regarding a paddlefish-poaching investigation.
The effort included eight individuals indicted for federal crimes involving the illegal trafficking of paddlefish and their eggs for use as caviar. Other states involved were Colorado, Illinois, Kansas, Minnesota, New Jersey, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina.
The arrests and citations were the result of a multi-year joint undercover investigation by MDC conservation agents and special agents of the USFWS involving the illegal commercialization of Missouri paddlefish and their eggs for national and international caviar markets. The undercover investigation ran during the spring 2011 and spring 2012 paddlefish seasons, March 15 through April 30. It was based out of Warsaw, Missouri. Additional MDC conservation agents and federal agents supported the undercover operation.
“Sport anglers may only catch two paddlefish daily and the eggs may not be bought, sold or offered for sale,” Yamnitz explained. “Extracted paddlefish eggs may not be possessed on waters of the state or adjacent banks and may not be transported. Paddlefish and their eggs may be commercially harvested only from the Mississippi River.”
He added that through the undercover operation, agents were able to identify suspects engaged in wildlife violations involving the illegal purchase, resale and transport of paddlefish and their eggs, document other violations of the Missouri Wildlife Code in addition to the core investigation, and determine that paddlefish eggs harvested in Missouri were being illegally transported out of the state for redistribution.
Federal crimes tied to the poaching involve violations of the Lacey Act. The Act makes it a federal crime to poach game in one state with the purpose of selling the bounty in another state and prohibits the transportation of illegally captured or prohibited wildlife across state lines.


Op-Ed - 3/21/13 Edition
The opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Lathrop Publishing.

To: Doctor and 8th District Representative, Jim Neely
From: Mylissa Stutesman, Clinton County Democrat
Subject – House Bill 457, House Bill 64
You have two years to show viable representation for the 8th District and so far, you have failed miserably! You won the majority vote, but not on party politics. Obviously, there were Democrats who voted for you, because of a slanderous campaign toward your opponent perpetrated by an opportunist. However, many of these wayward Democrats also do not agree with your votes on HB 457 and HB 64.
First, you voted to deny emergency contraception to rape victims through a Bill that is flipped around to reflect as though it protects the religious feelings of Medical Workers i.e. does not believe in Birth Control on any level. This Bill is Right Wing Spin to circumvent discrimination toward women, who are protected under the U. S. Constitution.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms: Oh Dreaded Goat
I’m sorry, I just can’t get past this loathing of the animal known as the goat. The goat isn’t a farm animal; it’s a plague on mankind, it’s the very Wrath of God in action, Old Testament-style. Shall I list the crimes of this 4-footed demon who is quite logically associated with the devil in various cultures?
They stomp on your feet. They head-butt you and anyone else they can get. They’re little problem solvers so their entire ranch resume revolves around escaping fenced-in pastures. And their cries! No matter what they’re upset about they bawl, literally, like children. I’ll go running out in the middle of the night, sure that our nanny has her head caught in the fence and is freezing to death or strangling, just to find this abhorrent creature bawling because her best friend, the other nanny Cinnamon, has walked out of eye sight. They have to be reunited or no one gets to sleep that night.
So, all things being equal, what do you get when you despise one of God’s creatures as much as I hate our two goats? Why, you get two more of course! Somewhere, somehow our black Lamancha (you can tell by the tiny ears and the lovely singing voice) has been made with-kid by a ram that isn’t even around anymore, so imagine my surprise when I walk out and see two baby kids standing alone in the pasture while Lamancha and Cinnamon are out looking for something evil to do. Eventually I determined who the mother was, but being a goat and not the excellent natural mothers that sheep are, I had to lock Lamancha and her two kids (both girls) up in a horse stall just so the babies would get fed. Fate doth indeed mock me, for our barn is attached to our house and now, strictly speaking, I have to live with the very animal that to me is the embodiment of all evil.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms: Firearms (Again!)
Well, we all know by now how our local Dude of Mystery (D.M. for short) shot a hole in the face of the would-be, almost-armed robber at the bank in Tremble. You know that I’m big on the 2nd Amendment – mostly because I don’t want Bernie Cassity mad at me! – so it’s natural to assume that I’m jumping up and down on the CCW bandwagon because a concealed carrier scored a touchdown. Sure, a little. Mostly I’m just thinking about that scene from “Fargo” and how much everything hurts in the cold.
Let’s just pretend I already wrote a 600-word rant about the Right to Keep and self-defense and jump right to the heart of the issue: what’s a human life worth? According to the signs on I-35, if you hit a highway worker it’s a $10,000 fine so that sounds like a good starting figure for one Missourian, but in the Trimble case the robber didn’t get anything except shot. Our bank employee, which could mean Board Director or President or maybe just a teller, at least hit his target. I always considered that good gun control, unless of course some of your shots missed and according to court records our D.M. missed with half his shots.


Letters to the Editor - 3/7/13 Edition
I would like to thank you for printing the articles on the Posse’s participation in the Regional Horse Bowl competition, and Isabel Maddick’s member profile in this past week’s edition of the Rural Reporter.
All the members of our 4H club were very pleased to see their picture in the paper, and Isabel was very excited to see that you printed her article.
I appreciate your willingness over the past few months to showcase our club’s accomplishments.

Sincerely,
Kate Wright
Clinton County
Posse Reporter


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms: Founding Faith
My favorite publisher, heretofore renamed St. Pauli the Patient for having to deal with writers such as myself, sent me something seasonably funny; a picture of goats making their way in a snow drift up to their necks, with the words above “Live on a farm, they said. It’ll be fun, they said.” How true. Well, dear reader, I was warned about winters in Clinton County and having got off easy last year I now officially get it. The words that come to mind are on everyone’s lips these days: Snow-maggedon, snow-pocalypse and the latest, Snow-My-God!!!
Which brings me to the one and only point I have for this week’s column, our Maker.
I am not, as all of you have figured out by now, the brightest bulb on the tree but there are times when the things I don’t “get” pile up so high you need a calculator to see how behind (and blind) I’ve been. Let’s say you’re at the end of the road. It’s the 4th quarter of your life and the 2 minute warning has sounded. You’re pretty sure you’ve got an impending appointment with the Almighty and, between last gasps of air, you’re preparing a speech. What do you say? What do I tell my Lord that I did with the opportunities and resources I’ve had, and squandered, during my years? And what do I tell Him, standing before His throne, when He inquires “You didn’t get a chance to write about Me much, did you?”


Post Scripts - City, County, School and State
We’ve got a little bit for everyone this week-huh?
Just to highlight... please take note of the City’s plea to rural water customers (Lathrop City Water) to complete surveys. This is critical in following through with much needed grant money to begin the major water system improvements needed in Lathrop.
The Lathrop R-II School District has completed the draft of the CSIP Objectives and Strategies. These are really worth looking over and seeing what the teachers and administrators are focusing on as priorities. I know that personally, I would like to see more effort into the goal of encouraging community involvement in educational programs.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms: Infirmacy
This week I can only write about that issue closest to my heart, that vexing sword of Damocles that hangs over the head of our nation, that topic that has everybody’s eye: me not getting divorced.
My lovely wife, my beloved bride, is a good and virtuous woman, a real Proverbs 31’er if you know what I mean. Aside from the obvious question of “Then what’s she doing with that guy?” I take this moment to bow humbly before that fair power behind every throne, that gilded heart which guides our ways and relentlessly domesticates savages into men. Yes, take a bow, ladies: you’re tonight’s contestants on the Faux Farms Free-For-All.
Like the giant moth that keeps flying into the bug zapper, I don’t know how many times I have to learn the lesson of feminine supremacy. I recall my mother visiting my father in the office from which he controlled his small construction empire, and I recall the conversation ongoing as she entered, resplendent in one of the pant suits of the day. My father and his business partner were discussing how things work in the real world, that world of grease and grime that is supposedly as foreign to women as the concept of using north/south when giving directions. These two philosophers reflected eloquently on the aggressive decision-making abilities of men, on their determination to act when it mattered, and how ladies somehow didn’t have this in them. And both were adamant that this was the secret behind the success of America and every American.


Post Scripts - Mrs. C goes to Washington (Well, Jeff City)
This was my second year attending Great Northwest Day at the Capitol. The first year I had become aware of the event, Cindy Weers emailed me with such enthusiasm and excitement to be a part of this event. And quite honestly, I didn’t get it.
Okay... so we have a booth... we throw a party... and we rub elbows with our legislators. How does this help us?
I suppose in my mind, I was thinking about attracting businesses to Lathrop. I was thinking about attracting families to move to Lathrop. I was thinking about our streets and our sidewalks and our parks.
Last year was my first full walk-through of the event as co-coordinator with Kate Long...the fireball from Detroit that found herself in rural Plattsburg about 8 years ago. Efficient and thorough as she is, she patiently walked me through the year... picking up raggedy loose ends and keeping me on track.
On track, for what, exactly, I wasn’t sure. All I knew was that it was going to cost me two days of vacation and a frantic sprint to the end to finish the Powerpoint for Clinton County.
Last year, I woke up late after working until after midnight on a Monday night to finish the paper... drove four hours without having my hair fixed or makeup on... rushed around for lunch and meetings just in time to put together the 8’ booth courtesy of the Plattsburg Chamber of Commerce.
In the wrong shoes. Ugh.
This year, bless her heart, she once again picked up my raggedy loose ends and refrained from getting too frustrated with me, as this year we have put together a website for Clinton County. We were comfortable enough showing it off at Jeff City, but have a few finishing touches before we do the big Tah Dah moment.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms: Lambtics
Of all the dreams from childhood, of sailing the seas and steering the stars, never once did I think I’d be a sheepherder. Shows what I know. More to the point, I would never have believed I’d enjoy it, but the truth is that I do. In fact, of several interesting occupations ranging from journalist to mariner (and construction worker), I’d have to say that the small-scale sheep ranching I’ve done for going on 2 years now is possibly the most satisfying work in my history, especially the lambing.
For one thing, they’re hilarious. They bounce and bound, launching themselves flat-footed from either a dead run or a standstill and almost levitating in the air with their chins held high with joy. And when they land sometimes they just freeze and look at you looking at them or they just snap right into another bounce, never seeming even to bend their knees (if sheep even have knees!). They don’t seem to do this when they’re scared or angry, not that a 9 pound baby ram’s anger is anything to get in a twist about, but just for the fun of it. Theirs is the appreciation of life in its raw form, the pleasure of just being there and being young and leaping for joy like an idiot.
I feel pretty comfortable around you folks, so I don’t mind throwing a little Bible in there now and then, because a good shepherd does indeed know his flock, and his flock knows his voice. And he will of course leave the 99 to find the one, and there’s always at least one. What my neighbors must think, should my voice carry on a cold day, hearing me “BAAAA!!!” as loud as I can to my meandering flock, undoubtedly chewing that far greener grass on my neighbor’s land instead of my own. And one gets smarter about these things, about a lot of things actually from good gloves and socks to tipping a big hay bale onto a tilt trailer, and long ago I figured out the old “rattling corn in a tin pale” trick. And then they come a-running.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms - "So, God Made a Farmer"
presented by S. Daily Warren
The following is a transcript from a speech given by Paul Harvey to the Future Farmers of America in 1978. The speech, which was acclaimed at the time on its own merit, vaulted to the national stage this past Sunday at the Super Bowl in a very tasteful commercial for Dodge trucks.
A host of powerful images accompanied the edited version for the commercial. Old, broken hands with roughly cracked nails made an impact with me as I’ve seen many a hand like that in Clinton County. Sun baked, weather beaten faces smiling into the cold. Even the children look strong and true in their denim jeans and coarse boots. And to hear it all in the rich, resonating voice of Paul Harvey adds a sense of mystical wonder.
A wise woman once said “A writer needs to write”, but in this case the very best words on the subject have already been written. I reproduce for you here, with the expressed permission from the FFA, the speech in its entirety.
I dedicate this column to those many generations, those masters of the land who toil for little profit and scant praise, who have fed us all for so long.


8th District Jim Neely’s Capitol Report: Greetings to the 8th District!
Committee Hearings are well under way and a lot of progress has been made. Medicaid expansion, 2nd Amendment issues, and of course the Budget are all big topics receiving a lot of time and attention by the legislature. Another important topic that was brought to my attention while serving on the Veterans committee was the Missouri Veterans History Project. “The Missouri Veterans History Project (MVHP) is a not-for-profit corporation organized to interview and record the stories of our veterans. Our nation’s veterans each have a unique perspective to share about our history. First-hand recollections of their service provide a richer and more personal context to historical accounts.” If you know a Veteran that would like to share their story please contact MVHP at 573-522-4220.
Benevolent tax credit changes
HCS HB 87, which is sponsored by Rep. Burlison (R-133), was Reported Do Pass out of Rules Committee on January 30, 2013. The bill changes the laws regarding certain benevolent tax credits. Supporters indicate these tax credits will benefit numerous Missouri families. The House Committee Substitute changes the name of the Children in Crisis Tax Credit to the Champion for Children Tax Credit after the original sponsor of the tax credit, former Senator Norma Champion. These tax credits are a good vehicle to drive donations to private agencies and promote a community investment approach to fundraising. The ability to utilize local, private investors who get to choose how they spend their tax dollars instead of letting the state choose for them is a positive move.
On the State of the State address
This week Governor Jay Nixon delivered the State of the State address. While I agree with the Governor on many issues, and eagerly anticipate working with his administration to tackle these problems, we disagree on the method to accomplish many of the goals outlined in his address. Much of our aging infrastructure and architecture is in desperate need of repair or complete replacement. Roads and bridges, schools and parks can all be improved, but assuming more debt and expecting our children to pay for it is not financially practical or responsible.
Medicaid Expansion
One goal that stands out to me that I will not support is the Governor’s desire to expand Medicaid. In August 2010, 72% of Missouri voters cast a ballot to block the implementation of the Affordable Care Act in the state. Now the Governor wants to implement the Affordable Care Act. Once the Federal funding for the expansion ends, and it will end, there will be no way for the state to pay for such a massive program. The Governor is pushing President Obama’s healthcare agenda, bigger government, and a program with an unsustainable rate of growth. I cannot, in good conscience, pour billions of your hard earned tax dollars into a broken program. My commitment is to represent the will of the people, and the people have voted to prevent the Affordable Care Act from financially devastating our state. Instead, my colleagues in the House and I will examine plans to transform our Medicaid program, to repair what is no longer working as well as it could, so the neediest Missourians among us can receive quality care. I will keep you up to date on this ongoing process.
Nominations for Senior Service Award
Lt. Governor Peter Kinder’s office is accepting nominations for this year’s Lt. Governor’s Senior Service Award. The Lieutenant Governor’s Senior Service Award is intended to promote and highlight the positive accomplishments Missouri’s senior citizens provide to their local communities. To qualify for the award, you must be at least 60 years old and volunteer a minimum of 25 hours per year. Winners will receive a certificate of recognition and will be recognized at the annual Senior Service Award banquet here at the Capitol in May. If you know someone who you would like to nominate go to http://ltgov.mo.gov/senawdindex.htm or contact my office. There will be a winner from each of the state’s 34 senatorial districts. Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder said, “There are thousands of Missourians whose lives are touched by the unselfish work and caring hands of volunteering seniors. These acts of kindness go on unnoticed all around us every day. These seniors offer their time and labor back to the community, and I want to bring these stories to the public, so we can all thank them for their work.” The deadline to submit applications is March 31, 2013.
Representative Neely may be reached at 201 West Capitol Avenue, Room 115C
Jefferson City, MO 65101-6806
Phone: 573-751-0246
Email: jim.neely@house.mo.gov


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms: Best Quotes from the Country
It’s the graduate school of hard knocks out here on the farm, but you can’t live this lifestyle and not succumb to the earthy wisdom of those who’ve made it through innumerable bitter winters, droughts and challenges of every kind. The best thing about this place, and inversely the worst thing about city living, is being able to count on your friends and neighbors. When you do what I do – the physical rigor of tapping keys on a keyboard - you learn to listen to people, and here’s a selection of some sound country wisdom that I found worthy enough to preserve in print.
I’ve lived most of my life on concrete and asphalt. Even my daddy was a concrete man and poured the floors in more Johnson County warehouses and manufacturing plants than I can remember. So donning my muck boots and heading out to the pasture in the rain I commented once to a rancher about how surprised I was at the amount of mud one had to deal with. My first dose of country reality came when he replied with a laugh, “Uh…that’s not mud.”
Another occasion found me in the company of a local homebuilder and landlord who even has a city street named after him. He related an “altercation” he had with a tenant in St. Joe who mistakenly thought that acting threatening was a good way of getting out of his rent payment. The builder-landlord’s response was classic, and effective: “I’m a professional carpenter. I hit things for a living. I can pound you like a nail for 8 hours and not get tired.”
Then there was the turkey rancher, elaborating on one of nature’s most ridiculously stupid animals (not counting journalists). “How bright can you be when someone has to hold your head under water to teach you how to drink? If they look up during a rain storm, they’ll drown.”
But there’s technology in the country too, and folks know not only its benefits but its limitations. “It’s a smart phone, all right. Sometimes it decides to work and sometimes it decides not to. Sounds pretty smart to me.”


Post Scripts - A new county website for Clinton County
Unless you are out there building robots or writing logarithms for computer generated 3-D printers, you are behind the curve.
And I don’t mean the gentle bends on 33 Hwy toward Holt... I’m talking about some wicked hairpin, twisted, winding curves that are moving faster than you or I can keep up with.
I don’t care if you’ve got all your social networks fed through HootSuite.... or are building mobile apps.... or even if you can set your thermostat, pop dinner in the oven and let the dog out from your smart phone on your way home from work... you ain’t seen nothin yet.
I had the great privilege of attending a Trends in Technology conference in Jefferson City last week. The first day was spent taking a 50,000 foot look at the pace of technology advancements and the “Internet of Things”.
The Internet of Things is actually a term you can Google. If you look it up, you can start to get the picture of how the “things” in our lives are rapidly all becoming connected in that big, wide world call the “web”.
Progressive’s Snapshot? That little doohickey you plug into your car to get lower rates--(you know, Flo stands in the dark alley saying, “Come on, every body’s doing it”)--yep, data transferred and stored on the internet. Your map app on your phone? It knows where you are.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms - For the Love of Badge-Kissing
But first, the farm report!
Due to the out-of-control lascivious sex industry here at the farm, my ewes seem to be dropping babies in bitter and untimely January. No casualties, and my better ¾’s isn’t ashamed to bundle up a baby lamb and bring it by the fire for a time. She found them, after all, during a feeding time when I was in bed with a cold watching cartoons and eating Fruit Loops. The evidence spoke for itself, and the next day I found both feeding buckets in the pasture and could imagine her spotting the lambs and yelling “Babies!”, literally dropping everything.
And then there were the puppies, offspring of noble Gus the Farm Dog and his Littles. They sold like hotcakes with calls coming in from as far as Wisconsin, mainly because country folks know a good farm dog. Heart-warming turned to heart-wrenching as they left to their new homes, but such is the circle of life. Being an old Baptist at heart, I blessed them and sent them on their way with barely a sniffle. Other than that we’re just like everyone else, watching wells and ponds go dry and the price of hay and auction animals go through the roof.
But we must return to the political arena again on the gun control issue that won’t go away. Never mind the left or the right, the state or the fed – has anyone considered what this does to law enforcement? Theirs was an impossible job to begin with. We want guns but no gun crime. We want good, honest cops but don’t seem to want to pay them well. We expect and demand a level of perfection in their behavior and appearance that we can never match ourselves and we still manage to say, “Where’s a cop when you need one?” The answer is simple: said cop is filling out endless paperwork, avoiding discrimination laws, watching what they say to the press and basically acting as everything from gunslinger to marriage counselor to baby sitter. All that and no dental!


Lager Capitol Report - Defending Our Second Amendment Rights
By Brad Lager
The U.S. Constitution serves as the foundation of our democracy. This structure, established by our founding fathers, was based on the belief that government should function to protect the rights of its citizens while ensuring their fundamental liberties are guaranteed. Shaped through their experiences to secure their independence, among the most cherished freedoms they prescribed in the Constitution was the right to keep and bear arms.
While we are all saddened by the tragedies happening across the country, we should be equally concerned about those who are taking these horrific events and using them as a political opportunity. Last week, through a series of 23 executive orders, President Obama launched an unprecedented attack on American’s Second Amendment Rights.
As soon as the President’s intentions were made public, a group of Missouri Senators took the steps necessary to do what we can to preserve, clarify and protect your Second Amendment rights. This legislation, Senate Bill 150, would declare certain federal firearm orders unenforceable within Missouri’s borders and makes it a crime for public officers, agents and employees, as well as licensed firearms dealers, to enforce such directives. Simply put, SB 150 would allow Missouri to only recognize the laws relating to weapons that were in effect on Dec. 31, 2012, and would prohibit enforcement of the president’s executive orders.
Our founding fathers had the wisdom and the foresight to recognize that changing times and evolving political agendas could emerge to threaten the rights and freedoms of future Americans. That is why the Bill of Rights was written to ensure specific protections of the freedoms that our founding fathers fought so hard to secure. Through strength and determination they established a framework for this new nation founded on the rights of individuals within a system of self government. It is now our responsibility to carry on their fight to ensure all of these rights are preserved for future generations of Americans.
As always, please feel free to call, email, or write with your ideas or concerns. The Capitol number is (573) 751-1415, my email is brad.lager@senate.mo.gov and my mailing address is Room 422, State Capitol Building, Jefferson City, MO 65101.


Dr. Jim Neely’s Capitol Report
By 8th District Representative, Dr. Jim Neely
Greetings from the Capitol. Let me first start off by saying Happy Birthday to my lovely wife, Sandy. Without her, I would not be where I am today. She is truly the rock of my foundation and I am sincerely blessed to have her in my life.
Late last week we finalized our list of membership to the various House Committees and I am honored to have been selected by the Speaker of the House to serve on the House Committee on Appropriations - Health, Mental Health, and Social Services, the House Committee on Health Care Policy, the House Committee on Health Insurance, the House Committee on Children, Families, and Persons with Disabilities and the House Committee on Veterans. If you find any of the above committees of interest to you, I encourage you to go online to www.house.mo.gov. There you will find up to date information about bills referred to committees, scheduled meetings, bill summaries, and a variety of other information concerning this process. I want to give you a brief description of the committee process and its importance in passing legislation.
In Article III, Section 22, of the Missouri Constitution it talks about the referral of bills to committees in which it states, “Every bill shall be referred to a committee of the house in which it is pending.” This means once a House Bill passes through the committee process and is Third Read and Passed by a vote on the floor of the Missouri House of Representatives, it still needs to be sent to the Senate for consideration and, constitutionally, must go through the committee process again in the Senate. The same process occurs for Senate Bills sent to the House of Representatives.
Serving on committees gives us the opportunity and, more importantly, the responsibility to truly dig deep into the substantive issues surrounding how proposed bills will affect life here in Missouri. This process also provides the avenue for public testimony in favor of, or against, proposed legislation. It is a remarkable process giving us the best possible legislation to ensure proper governance of the State of Missouri.
House Speaker Pro Tem Jason Smith’s legislation to give the people a voice in filling statewide office vacancies is one step closer to House approval. Smith’s legislation, HB 110, was approved by a vote of 11-1 by the House Elections Committee on Tuesday, January 15th. The bill is the first legislation to receive committee approval in the House this session.
Smith said the bill is one he has championed for the past several years because it represents good government and the right thing to do for the people of Missouri. The governor has stated he believes he has the authority to appoint a successor should the lt. governor’s office have a vacancy, which flies in the face of existing state law. HB 110 makes statute crystal clear that the people should and will choose who will fill a vacancy for a statewide office.
Smith has filed similar legislation in each of the last several sessions to require special elections to fill vacancies in the offices of lieutenant governor, secretary of state, attorney general, state auditor, state treasurer and United States Senator. Smith’s legislation would allow the governor to appoint a temporary office holder to fill a vacancy until the next general election is called.
The bill also would require the governor to call a special election to fill a statewide vacancy at the same time as a scheduled general election—preventing any additional cost from being passed on to Missouri taxpayers. This bill comes at a crucial time as U.S. Representative Jo Ann Emerson of the 8th District has announced that she plans to retire from her seat in February. Her replacement could potentially leave a vacancy in a statewide office. This possibility has left much controversy and debate throughout the 8th District. Hopefully, Smith’s bill will put some of this to rest.
I believe our fore fathers knew exactly what they were doing when they wrote the Constitution. I believe in every word of it from religious freedoms to the right to bear arms. This week I co-sponsored House Bill 170. This bill specifies that a federal official must not enforce a federal firearm law when the firearm is manufactured and remains in the state and that any new federal law banning or restricting ownership of a semi-automatic firearm is unenforceable. The second Amendment states that our right to bear arms should not be infringed. Infringed means interfered with; I intend to do what I can to ensure that our second amendment rights are not interfered with in any form.
There has been a great deal of discussion in the media from around the state that revolves around a proposed drastic expansion of the welfare entitlement of Medicaid. In economic terms, the expansion will cost the taxpayers billions of dollars over the next several years. I am committed to investing in our State’s healthcare system, for those who truly need assistance: our seniors, the disabled, the truly destitute and children who have no other resources. I am, however, opposed to the welfare expansion proposal because I believe Medicaid should be transformed. The ugly truth that lies within the Medicaid program is that it compensates providers at alarmingly low rates. Simple Medicaid expansion, as President Obama and Governor Nixon have proposed, will only exacerbate a broken system. It costs taxpayers billions in borrowed money with no end to the unprecedented deficit spending in sight. Let me reiterate: simply giving an individual a Medicaid card doesn’t ensure them access to care. Another solution has to been found.
As we enter what we health professionals traditionally dub “peak flu season” I want to urge you to know the signs of the flu and take the proper measures to protect yourself and your family. Symptoms of the flu are similar to the common cold, but tend to be more severe. Signs of the flu include; fever, body aches, tiredness and cough. Your health care provider can administer at test to determine if you have the flu or not. According to the CDC Influenza has spread to more than 80% of the United States and they are advising everyone who has not been vaccinated to do so now. WHACK the Flu is a community based flu prevention program from the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services. The acronym WHACK is simple:
W—Wash your hands often
H—Home is where you stay when you are sick
A—Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth
C—Cover your coughs and sneezes
K—Keep your distance from people who are coughing and sneezing
For more information on flu prevention and vaccination, visit www.flu.gov.

Veterans Designation on a Driver’s License
Are you a veteran? Would you like to have your driver’s license reflect your service? Visit Speaker Tim Jones’s blog at http://speakertimjones.blogspot.com/2013/01/veterans-designation-on-drivers-license.html to learn more.

Add your Cell Phone to the No-Call List
Would you like to add your cell phone to the state no-call list? Visit http://ago.mo.gov/nocalllaw/nocalllaw.htm to learn more.

Unclaimed Property
The state currently has hundreds of millions of dollars in unclaimed property that belongs to its citizens. Often, this property is an old bank account that was forgotten or unknown to heirs or even a deposit that a utility company tried to return but could not find a forwarding address. Visit http://www.treasurer.mo.gov/content/find-your-property to see if you have property waiting to be claimed.
I want to thank you again for your support and encourage your continued support as I begin the honorable task of representing the newly formed 8th District. Your participation in the election process helped put me in this office and it is with your participation I will be able to succeed in representing the 8th District. My office here at the Capitol in Jefferson City, Room 115C, is an extension of the 8th District. You, and your thoughts, are always welcome here.


Post Scripts - Something to Ponder
Okay...I am playing hooky this week. But I can’t think of anything better to fill this space with than some words of wisdom of the late George Carlin.

George Carlin’s wife died early in 2008 and George followed her, dying in July 2008. It is ironic George Carlin - comedian of the 70’s and 80’s - could write something so very eloquent and so very appropriate. An observation by George Carlin:
The paradox of our time in history is that we have taller buildings but shorter tempers, wider Freeways, but narrower viewpoints. We spend more, but have less, we buy more, but enjoy less. We have bigger houses and smaller families, more conveniences, but less time. We have more degrees but less sense, more knowledge, but less judgment, more experts, yet more problems, more medicine, but less wellness.
We drink too much, smoke too much, spend too recklessly, laugh too little, drive too fast, get too angry, stay up too late, get up too tired, read too little, watch TV too much, and pray too seldom.
We have multiplied our possessions, but reduced our values. We talk too much, love too seldom, and hate too often.
We’ve learned how to make a living, but not a life. We’ve added years to life not life to years. We’ve been all the way to the moon and back, but have trouble crossing the street to meet a new neighbor. We conquered outer space but not inner space. We’ve done larger things, but not better things.
We’ve cleaned up the air, but polluted the soul. We’ve conquered the atom, but not our prejudice. We write more, but learn less. We plan more, but accomplish less. We’ve learned to rush, but not to wait. We build more computers to hold more information, to produce more copies than ever, but we communicate less and less.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms - Faux Farms: Just a Day in the Country
“You’ve come far, pilgrim.” said Bear Claw Chris Lapp.
“Feels like far.” replied Jeremiah Johnson.
The day started early with the ritual tending of the fire, hot-burning hedge kindling to get the seasoned oak going, both harvested free. There’s coffee delivered to my sleeping beauty, and then the dogs go out which is always an adventure since Gus the Farmdog has never forgiven Albert the Boxer for growling at him one time. Sometimes Gus waits around the corner just to put the fear into Albert, who used to be a big dog. Then, after heating a pre-made breakfast – a sausage casserole from our own eggs – the real chores begin. But the animals eat first.
The ground is frozen into ragged shards, and most of the livestock have entertained themselves overnight by knocking over their water buckets, which were frozen anyway in spite of being “heated”. Baby lambs and chicks have to be checked, with nursing moms getting double portions, and the ever-fussy turkeys get a little something to keep them quiet or they’ll gobble incessantly while I make my rounds. Eileen the Crippled Cow is there, her winter coat thick and black, along with the obnoxious goats who still get their heads stuck in the fence.
On some mornings all the gas-powered equipment is started: tractor, truck, riding lawn mower which is hooked up to plow and till my garden, even the motorcycle, but not today since a cold morning start can be the death knell of any decent battery. And all the while, following me everywhere, constantly underfoot, are the puppies.


Post Scripts - In the event of an emergency....
What? What do you do in your home when the weather turns nasty and the weather forecasters are tracking a violent storm that looks like it’s heading our way?
For many, a southwest basement corner will provide shelter from high winds and debris. For some, a cellar, or even crawl space gives a safehaven.
But what about those in the mobile home park? In slab-built apartments? In the Lathrop Senior Housing? Where do these folks find shelter? And how will Lathrop respond in the event of a disaster?
With spring just around the corner, it is timely to consider the resources, expertise, and response that those in charge of protecting the public have in store for us.
At the First Christian Church, a sound group of volunteers have delved into the potential need for assisting the community in the event of a natural disaster, or even an extended power outage in parts of the town. I attended a meeting at the church on Saturday where Ralph Dishong from the American Red Cross in St. Joseph provided training to the Community Outreach volunteers attending on being an emergency Red Cross shelter.
Whether it is an approaching storm, a hazardous material spill, or a highway closing that could divert a hundred travelers off I-35 into Lathrop, you never know when the need for an emergency plan might exist.
I had the opportunity to listen to the Executive Director of the New Orleans Red Cross speak when I was there three years ago. I was there as part of my insurance communications job in Cameron, and to hear how the Red Cross acted during Katrina was amazing.
Disaster plans are put together, worked out, and reviewed on a regular basis. It becomes a living document, a living exercise that, yes, does sit on a shelf, but is available to pull off the shelf and put into action when the situation arises.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms - Faux Farms: An Old-Fashioned Fight for Freedom
Forgive this foray from my usual fun but our friends in the Painstream Media pushing up against the 2nd Amendment in the wake of Newtown have forced my hand, requiring me to dig out and hoist the yellow “Don’t Tread On Me” flag. With a little luck I can squeeze in a puppy story or two, but in the meantime I want to take a moment and share with you why we should push back against those who would further their political agenda over the bodies of children.
My reasoning is simple: tyranny just ain’t what it used to be.
You all know the argument for the 2nd Amendment and how little it has to do with the NRA’s ridiculous “right to hunt” concept, and you know the hearts and minds of the founding fathers when they wrote it, because they penned that bit of prose for a day just like today. Put simply: Americans can’t afford to give up any more rights. The U.S. Constitution is unique as a governing document in that it puts restrictions on government and not on the citizenry, an idea unheard of in 1789. You’ve heard of the Boston Tea Party in 1773, but were you aware of the imperial British response? I for one didn’t know until recently that in 1774 the crown of England banned the import of firearms and gun powder to the colonies, followed by a program of confiscation in 1775. History has a funny way of repeating itself.
But this isn’t the 1700’s. I for one don’t care if our government is upset about firearms or Nintendo’s; what matters is that this is a perfect place to draw a line in the sand and for very good reason. The tyranny of King George is nothing compared to the capability of modern man to enslave himself. The political climate doesn’t unnerve me near as much as the awesome technological power available to those with an endless thirst for control. Everyone in America has a computer “footprint” and nearly half the nation is on Facebook telling the world where they go and what they do, and nearly half of those folks use the social media site through their mobile phone or other portable device. We live in a society where our TV’s have started watching us and using software to predict our choices. No court order or search warrant is required if the state wants to snoop in your email inbox and the dreaded TSA now wants to hit America’s highways … and don’t even get me started about predator drones!


Conservation Comments: Find More Fish!
In today’s fast paced society, many of us rely on technology to aid us in our daily work and social endeavors. If you are one of the many outdoor users who own a so called “smart phone”, the Missouri Department of Conservation has an app for you! “Find MO Fish” was developed by the Missouri Department of Conservation and is available for free from your phone’s app store. “Find MO Fish” is also available by searching: newmdcgis.mdc.mo.gov/mofish <http://newmdcgis.mdc.mo.gov/mofish> .
Users who download this app are sure to be pleased with the amount of information available to them in a compact and portable package. “Find MO Fish” includes a photo map of many of the state’s most popular fishing areas. In this map, boat ramps and fish attractors are labeled for the user. The app also contains a driving directions tab and a detailed fish identification guide. This is a must have for Missouri anglers! For more information on the “Find MO Fish” app, research the Missouri Department of Conservation’s website at: www.mdc.mo.gov <http://www.mdc.mo.gov/> .
To report a conservation violation or for general conservation related questions, you may contact Clinton County Conservation Agent Adam Arnold at: (816)646-6926.


Post Scripts - Another New Year... Another Mulligan?
Wikipedia: In golf, a mulligan is a stroke that is replayed from the spot of the previous stroke without penalty, due to an errant shot made on the previous stroke. The result, as the hole is played and scored, is as if the first errant shot had never been made.
Pretty cool concept-huh? Otherwise known as a “do-over,” gets its fair share of use on a golf course. You know... the duff that dribbles 20 feet off the tee box; the shot out of the woods that banks off a tree 50 yards out of the line of travel.
Wikipedia also shares examples of the use of mulligans in things like politics, Fantasy Football, and relationships.
In real life, however, a year doesn’t get a mulligan. History has been established, and 2013 can only start fresh from January 1, with 365 days behind it.
The beauty, however, is there is 365 days before it.
I’m not sure about everyone else, but I would have to guess most people experience this: Days, weeks, or even months of skating along, top of the world, feeling pretty darn skippy about how things are going. During these times, I know I, personally, get to feeling a little too darn skippy, and have to watch myself, as my arm can only reach around so far to pat myself on the back.
I think it feels good to do things well. To have successes. To solve problems and figure things out.
And then, just when you think the air is just a little too thin to be carrying that heavy load of accolades, the mountain starts to crumble.
You get snow in your sock. The map you so “competently” plotted has brought you to a cavern that you can’t cross. You have neglected to properly prepare for your journey to greatness, and now the snow is moving in. Darkness is falling, and your food supply is low.
Well, chances are... if you’re a God-kind-of-listening-kind-of-person... that there was some still, small voice trying to tell you to pay attention. That when you were mapping your plans, a fork in the road warranted some wisdom that your pea-brain didn’t possess.
But, we knew better. We trusted ourself and our own abilities. Our own intellect. Our own experience, or our own reasonings.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms - Faux Farms: The Long-Awaited Gratuitous Sex Edition
(rated “G” for “goofy”)
Allow me to share a bit of Sociology:101 with you – every human being has these four necessities, in this order of importance: air, water, food and sex. Yes, you heard right, our friends in the ivory towers of academia have finally come to their senses and classified sex as something a human can’t live without, even if you’re just thinking about it and not actually doing it. That’s called sexuality and it’s a Cupid’s arrow to which even my own better ¾s is not immune. It all started one snowy day…
I was trying to make my way up an icy hill near our house. Halfway up the car lost traction and began to slide sideways down the hill. I’d take my foot off the brake and slide closer and closer to the ditch. Just as I was pondering what to do … phone a friend? abandon the car? … a young man wearing military-style pants and a tight T-shirt, without so much as a coat, comes bounding through the snow like an elk, yelling “I’ll be right there, ma’am.” In one slick move, he leaps over the barbed-wire fence. I didn’t even see where he came from. He leaned against the door like the Marlboro Man and says that I seem to be stuck but not to worry. Then, with one hand, he pushes the front end of the car and it pirouettes gracefully on the ice so that it’s facing downhill now. And with a tip of an invisible hat he salutes and saunters off, perhaps whistling the theme music from “Superman”. It was a perfect example of male awesomeness.
That, dear readers, was my wife. It was the first time I ever heard her use the word “strapping” in reference to a carbon based life form, and she had a strangely pleased and distracted look to her when she did. I had no choice but to pursue the whole story.


Post Scripts - Remembering 2012 ...and my friend Carol
Do we ever enter a new year without saying, I can’t believe it’s already XXXX?
Twenty twelve, folks! I actually started to fill out a check the other day and started to write 19XX.
I can’t help but look back on the year and think of those we lost. Young lives taken too quickly; icons that have left their legacy. A meth crazed double murder, and an unimaginable child abuse case that ended the life of a precious four year old. We have seen the tragedy of the murder-suicide of an affluent professional football player, double murder-suicide of a normal family that had a darkness that couldn’t be shaken, and mass murder-suicide that robbed 20 families of their sweet angels.
My heart grieves for this world, and for the families that are hurting so deeply this Christmas season, missing those that they love.
Each and every life listed on page three of this week’s paper has a story to tell. Be it a name you or I may know or not. Be it a lonely soul that left this earth without the comfort of friends and family, or be it a life that has left annals of tales and legend.
I could not help but think, however, that there was a name missing from that list. The name of my friend, Carol Thompson.
Carol has been missing.... missing... since June of 2012. 2012 will always be the year that her friends and family will remember last seeing her. Her name did not... could not... make that list. She was not lost in 2012... we went missing in 2012.
For days after her disappearance, I believe there was hope that in her exasperation, or perhaps disorientation, that she left the home she was staying in to get away from pressures or struggles. The short-lived hope that she could be living the dream of following around NASCAR or Bob Segar and the Silver Bullet Band quickly waned.
She was too close to those she loved. She was a doting grandmother and ferocious mama bear. The hope that a call would soon come in... or a message on Facebook... or some activity somewhere, was never realized.


Be Our Guest - Opinion Editorial: Farmville
by S. Daily Warren
Great. I’m in trouble again, but this time I plead no contest, or voire dire, or maybe the insanity cop. Buckle yourselves onto your John Deer, folks, because we’re going for a roll!
Now that I’ve joined the ranks of semi-unsuccessful agriculturalists, now that I’ve burned my ships behind me and have nowhere else to go, I can do what any self-respecting journalist would do slam the other guy. It’s not that I mind a little friendly competition, although when it comes to the two newsbirds of Clinton County I think one has community interests at heart more than the other.
The whole time I’ve lived here the other guys in Plattsburg have had it in for our beloved, unintimidating, crowd-pleasing Rural Reporter but some of their jabs just seem so…petty. They even tried to buy me away when they heard the Reporter was hiring another writer, and since I’m just a bum it’s obvious they weren’t after my skills but instead wanted to hurt the little guy. Schmucks.
Having come here for the dream of a small farm in a small town, working for a small town paper was just gravy on the ‘taters. You’d think that with 423.47 square miles in Clinton County there’d be enough room for two viewpoints. The Rural Reporter isn’t the Gray Lady (New York Times), but that’s its charm: it doesn’t want to be or try to be. I work for someone who puts God and Family and Country before politics or local machinations.
So what’s my problem? What’s put sand in my craw? Simple: flower crushers.


Post Scripts - Unimaginable…
The horrific acts that took place December 14, 2012 in Newtown, Connecticut will stay with us for years. It is this decade’s 9/11. This generation’s Columbine. And this country’s wake up call.
There have been some amazing, precious words spoken to honor those who lost their lives last week.. and to those that lost their children. The shock and terror of it all has once again brought out the very best in humanity, and the compassion and blind innocence that witnessed evil brings us together as we grieve.
But there is anger, I know. There is anger about guns. There is anger about mental health resources. And there is anger in the fact that the world is becoming an ugly, ugly place.
During the politics of the election, I entered into a conversation where I thought my final line, "This ain’t my grandpa’s country anymore" would give me the final say. Instead, my friend from the other side of the aisle chimed in to say, "No, it’s not... it’s better!"
I’m sorry, but I have a difference of opinion.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms - A Native Nativity
No words of mine can capture the horror last week in Connecticut, and I won’t even try except to encourage prayers for the families and survivors and to remind us all that eviscerating the 2nd Amendment is not the solution to our problems. We know we lived in an armed society, and to leave our most precious resource unguarded is a problem of policy, not policing.
As always there are innumerable things to talk about; the Mayan epoxy-clypse next week (have you packed?) and the resulting end of the world as we know it (no more trouble parking at the mall!), the Libor rate-fixing scandal bleeding over from Europe to the U.S., the web and wiki-leaks revolutionary Julian Assange holed up in the Ecuador embassy in London, the fact that I can train my alpacas to tap dance but can’t keep my dogs off the furniture…the list is endless.
But ‘tis the season and we all need a little Christmas cheer. In this spirit, my better ¾’s and I bundled ourselves up, tossed a llama in a trailer and participated (mostly by shivering over cups of hot chocolate) in the First Christian Church of Lathrop’s first annual nativity scene. Powerful stuff, eh? Well, it was for us. About half the town showed up and drove through the church parking lot to hear the carolers and see the manger scene, although it’s interesting to note that if Jesus were born today he’d never make it out of that barn without a social security number and a therapist. What made it so awesome? What made it different from all the other cardboard cut-out manger scenes with a teenage angst-ridden Joseph and Mary who’d rather be texting about their latest Playstation scores? That’s easy.


Notes of Whatever
Whoa! Once again I find Christmas slipping up on me, it comes faster and faster each year. And this will have to be considered my Christmas Letter, since I didn’t get cards sent yet again this year.
Christmas is the time of the year we think of family, it consumes our thoughts! And I can’t help thinking about the families of the students of Sandy Hook, their loss is our loss, their pain is our pain. No words can comfort these families as they struggle with the senseless act that took their loved one, only prayers for healing the wounds of sorrow.
EBES principal Terry Poindexter sent an email to the parents of his students stating: "Like everyone, we were shocked and saddened by last week’s school shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut. We’re sure that you share our sympathy for those affected by this tragedy, as well as a desire to ensure that parents understand what they can do to support school safety.
We’d like to help. We are making available, at no charge, an electronic copy of our popular publication entitled "Staying Safe: A Key to Your Student’s Success." It’s a very short publication that includes ideas parents can use to help students learn several essential safety rules. The publication is available at:
http://www.parent-institute.com/StayingSafe-111F.pdf


Post Scripts - It’s beginning to look a lot like...
Is it just me, or has anyone else noticed the excitement in the air this Christmas season in Lathrop?
Bringing back the Christmas Homes Tour was a wonderful thing, and we have the First Baptist Church to thank for that. Over 80 people came out and five families opened their beautiful homes to share the holiday spirit.
Hopefully, those that were also out on Saturday to enjoy A Pirate’s Life for Me, the school musical, were also able to see the hustle and bustle of a busy town.
This Sunday, the Assembly God, First Baptist, United Methodist, and Christian churches will reincarnate the Living Nativity at the First Christian Church parking lot. Live animals and carollers will set the scene to reenact the Christmas Story and collect items for the Food Pantry. I know this is an event that my children have memories of...
On top of that, we have two new beauty salons, and three new retail shops open downtown!
This is a wonderful example of the amazing people we have in Lathrop. The terrific churches and organizations that care about making Lathrop a great place to call home!


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms - For the Love of Pranks
The day finds me sad today, which is why I should probably stop watching the news except for the boots-on-the-ground local stuff, which is to mainstream news as Leave it to Beaver is to Sex in the City. Or maybe it’s the dry winter-drought cold that gets one down, but no matter. My father taught me the cure for this malady when I was 6 and he came home from work, saw the huge hole I’d burned in the carpet mucking about with the fireplace, laughed once and went into his den. Nothing beats humor for the blues, or the doldrums to use the nautical parlance. At times like this all I have to do is recollect famous pranks.
Being a fan of physical humor of the Three Stooges variety, with a dash of Monty Python thrown in, my favorite prank memory was at the old Baptist church I attended in younger years. A buddy had loaned his car to one of us in the usual gang of rascals, and the Evil Genius of the bunch (we’ll call him John) came up with a beauty. Returning the car to our buddy, John loaded the two driver’s air vents with flour and pointed the vents directly at where his face would be. Then, with the car power turned off, he set the fan to high, locked the door and handed over the keys. We were peeking around the corner trying not to give it away and, for once, it went off like TV sitcom clockwork and the vent completely doused our friend’s face with flour like an inverted Al Jolson.


Post Scripts - It could have been anyone...
Saturday morning might as well have been 9/11/2001 all over again. Marty and I caught a piece of the news on the radio. What’s going on out at Arrowhead? The radio states a Chief player had killed his girlfriend then turned the gun on himself. I turned to the internet. It was Belcher. Then we turned on the television, and sat glued to the tube as the horrific details unfolded.
On the radio, I listened to the announcer, who like most on-air personalities, have reached their position by exercising influence and gaining listeners. I just want people to remember when they go to the stadium tomorrow, this man is a murderer. It’s not a time to memorialize him. Not a time to make signs and banners in his honor. He’s a murderer.
But the tragedy of the day overshadowed anyone’s burning anger. The young lives that ended Saturday morning, and the innocent life of that 3-month old baby that was spared, gave no reason for anything other than sorrow and grief. The state of mind Javon was in... the unbelievable violence that took place in the same house his mother was in... and then the tragic scene witnessed by Pioli and Crennel.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms - The Odyssey
Hiya, folks. I was all prepped to write another long-winded monologue about our "Boxer Children" and how they belong anywhere but out in the country. I could tell you about the two new baby lambs that came into our world out of season, and how all the local predators flocked to their new baby shower, only to find Gus the Farm Dog diligent in his duty making the young ones nigh unapproachable. Good old Gus.
I could go on and tell you how the Boxer Children, Albert and his mother Morgan, decided to get in on the festivities by jimmying the gate to their dog run and taking off in the early hours of Monday evening for a little cross country sprinting, and the Great Search that ensued. My beloved and I were out for hours hunting these two idiots down with flashlights, but to no avail. Shame really, because like all good stories it had a happy ending: both Boxers did what they always do and ran playfully through Glenn Colehour’s pasture, wading in cow poo and otherwise making a nuisance of themselves. Glenn called up the next morning, chuckling, to inform us that both Albert and Morgan were leaning against his gate, utterly exhausted and looking ever so hungry. It’s a fact of life that dogs run away, but when you spoil them as badly as we do the question always eventually appears in the dog’s mind – where would I run away too?
But I spin no such tale today. As the Boxers repose on the furniture, barely able to move under their own power from fatigue, my wife and I went about our day with relief. What hit me from the morning news was the journalistic equivalent to a ton of bricks, which I’ll get to shortly.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms - Fall Farm Report Part 2
Riddle me this: "I’m a picture on canvas that can never be torn, and I show a new painting every morn. What am I?"
(answer to last week’s riddle: a human being – crawls on all fours as a babe, walks on 2 legs during life, then uses a cane later in age)
Butchery. One truly gets a feel for Thanksgiving by providing the turkey, and the day before this Thanksgiving past saw the systematic execution of 3 turkey hens for friends and family, and for crimes against humanity. I thought the harvest would be worse than it was, just as I needlessly feared the cleaning and dressing, but it wasn’t so bad…except for the turkeys, they didn’t like it. I even saved the different types of feathers.
Which brings me to the future of Faux Farms, which has certainly been the enterprise and experience of a lifetime; maybe, just maybe it’s time to let the farm grow up a bit. That mostly means money.


Post Scripts - On Risk & Reward....
Risk and Reward... one topic I have given a great deal of thought to over the past few years.
I wasn’t thinking of it necessarily this evening, until I was visiting with a dear friend from days gone by, Reggie Moore.
I was busily running through downtown Lathrop tonight, catching up with the new businesses that are opening their doors, and I had to share my experience from being in downtown Plattsburg a couple weeks ago.
Our small, but mighty, Great Northwest Day committee normally meets at the Clinton County Youth Building on Hwy. 116. This particular night, a Wednesday night, the building was unavailable, so I checked my email, and the new location was Court something-or-other in Plattsburg.
In the back of my mind, I swore it said Courtyard... as in Community Courtyard. A beautiful public place berthed from a renovated downtown building.
As I pulled into the parking lot and into the building, I couldn’t find my group, but there was obviously an active group of ladies getting ready to do yoga, pilates, or something that should be celebrated with a glass of wine.


Post Scripts - Being Thankful...
I started out November on a hopeful note. A note that I would endeavor to post my “Thankful” posting on Facebook every day through November.

I pretty much blew that after day three. And the day I was thankful for Kendall Jackson doesn’t really count.

We set aside November and Thanksgiving as a time to specifically recognize those things and people we are thankful for. I would like to say that being thankful is something that each day we should be mindful of. And for the most part... I’d say 75% of the time, I think I have an attitude of thankfulness. I know I have many FB friends that are truly of that mindset, and they remind me daily... November or not... that being thankful is a choice.

Each day, we choose to set our hearts on the things that really matter. The relationships in our lives that make it richer; the blessings that we’ve been that we enjoy; the trials we’ve overcome to bring us to a higher place.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms - Fall Farm Report Part 1
This week’s riddle: what goes on 4 legs in the morning, 2 legs during the day, and on 3 legs in the evening?

(answer to last week’s riddle: What’s light as a feather yet no man can hold it for long? One’s breath.)

Kismet, or destiny, is a wheel and it turns always. Now it turns to the bi-annual farm report, to let you know how things are going and, perhaps, that there is a method to my madness. Not really, but that’s how I’ll spin it anyway. And to tell it right requires a trip down memory lane, but I’ll just touch upon the highlights.

In my time here, going on two years, I’ve seen many things. Most of the funniest have to do with roosters, and the laughs just keep on coming even as of today. Earlier I saw a red rooster go after a tom turkey twice his size, and while I think there may be a law against this sort of activity if one sells tickets or takes bets, I still found it fascinating. Out would stretch his wing feathers, upward would jut his tail feathers, leaping straight up and down in a terrible dance of death, this rooster bloomed up twice his size and put on a heckuva show. Then the turkey bit him on the back of the neck. As tom was dragging this once-proud fellow across the yard two turkey hens apparently had grudges they wanted to settle and began pecking the rooster’s backside during his humiliation. He escaped with little injury, and no pride.


Post Scripts - Rubik’s Cubes and other things I can’t figure out...
I like a good challenge. Figuring something out or solving a problem is a challenge that I usually relish.
But that was before I met the Rubik’s Cube.
I’ve never been one to easily give up. As a matter of fact, I’m more likely to hold on to a lose-lose situation just trying to figure out how to conquer it than to concede to the fact that I’m beat.
For my fellow Rubik’s Cube players that never managed to get all those stupid square stickers on the same side, you know what I’m talking about. Especially if you really, really tried.
And especially if you’re not used to losing.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms - Fathomable Fancies
What’s as light as a feather, yet no man can hold it for long?
(answer to last week’s riddle: a river)
This is a second foray into one of my favorite subjects, the sea, and it’s a diversion that must be wrapped up right quick lest I lose myself in the pleasure of it. Far more intriguing than politics, in my opinion, as I and many others are happy to see the political season go. But the sea! The sea is forever, so let’s take one last look before I retire uncomfortably to my new life of sod busting and sheep herding.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms - Song of the Sea
What can run but never walks, has a mouth but never talks, has a bed but never sleeps, has a head but never weeps?
It’s been said that riddling is the oldest game people still play, and it’s one of my favorite pastimes. Last week I had the foolish audacity to make a bold prediction about the outcome of this year’s presidential election, and while I couldn’t hope more to have been wrong (and still might be, as the results pour in) politics to me is more like a riddle, the answer to which is almost always self-evident. When the answer is not, it terrifies me…much like this election does.
I’m not a good riddler; I’m more of a technician than an engineer and simply collect them to rearrange the parts into something pleasing, but I believe every person is a unique riddle in his or her own right. My riddle, the sum of my parts, comes from the sea whose song has been in my ear since my earliest memories of watching Popeye cartoons or stealing my father’s boat to go joy-riding during thunderstorms at the Lake of the Ozarks. Part and parcel to any pleasing riddle is the comedic irony, which in my case is the fact that I get violently seasick. Never stops me, but I’m pretty fond of Dramamine. Even funnier is to be here, landlocked in Missouri about as far from the great waters as one can geographically be.


Be Our Guest: Lathrop Fire has NEVER had a property tax rate increase!
by Jim Gerber
The Lathrop Fire Protection District needs you to buy them one, lousy, stick of gum….
The Lathrop Fire Protection District was established in 1994. The initial property tax levy back then was .3004 cents per $100 of assessed valuation. The next year it was lowered to .2704 cents where it still stands 18 years later.
Prior to 1994 the fire department had one fire house at city hall, with two bays and three 1950’s fire trucks. At that time there were approximately eight volunteer fire fighters, unpaid and uninsured to save Lathrop from disaster. Of the original firemen five are still with the department.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms - Of Fumbles and Feather Beds
I had the pleasure of bumping into some of our blinding stars of the local media world the other day; one at the incredible Mules game and another at the 4-H club. Both had sardonic grins and one even complimented me on my “great writing” of late. I took it in good stride because Truth, no matter how few and far between these days, doth indeed speak to power.
I always knew this place would drive me a little mad and now it’s happened… and you know what? Just like the upcoming elections, just like that little minx Madonna acting like an idiot at the Sprint Center, just like all the talk about the Book of Revelation, the Apocalypse ain’t all that bad. Just think of all the open parking! I’ll end this column with the election, as I have (in my strange brew of madness and wisdom) something of a prediction.
As promised we return now to our previous broadcast - All My Children at Faux Farms, and I have the count. We have: 7 turkey, 16 chickens, 4-count-them-4 roosters (no, I’m not running ***** fights, I just hate killing anything that doesn’t deserve it), 2 farm dogs, 4 goats, 14 sheep and 5 alpaca. And don’t forget Eileen, the Crippled Cow who is flourishing and may be running a marathon soon. I plan to make money out of all this nonsense, and soon, but for now it’s still a petting zoo until auction time.


Letters to the Editor - 11/1 Edition: Resident thanks Commissioner for seeing animal shelter issue through
Letter to Editor,
For over five years our neighborhood on Haynesville Road, Holt, MO, has been dealing with an “Animal Shelter” operation in a residential sub-division with an overwhelming number of animals - in excess of 150 cats and 50+ dogs. Many of the animals were being held in less than ideal conditions and many had serious health problems.
Over the past three months, the State of Missouri Animal Health Division and the State Attorney General’s office have become involved and it now appears this issue is finally being resolved.


Letters to the Editor - 11/1 Edition: Reader claims newspapers inaccurate and biased
The opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Lathrop Publishing.

Reader claims newspapers inaccurate and biased

Dear Editor,
Maybe it is just me, but when I pick up a paper and read a news article I would like to see some elements of actual fact finding in the whole article and not just a part of it. According to Case.Net which anyone can access, Ms. Larose did not file a sexual harassment suit against Mr. Crenshaw or the Lathrop Senior Housing as you stated in the Oct. 24th issue of the paper.


Lager Capitol Report: Amendment 3 - Judicial Accountability
For nearly a decade, there has been much discussion about the process used to select Missouri’s Appellate and Supreme Court judges. This plan, often called the Missouri Plan, was originally created in the 1940s and came about in an attempt to end the political corruption that had arisen in Missouri’s judiciary. This process formed a commission that would compile a panel of prospective judges and submit that list to the governor for selection. Although the plan was a great improvement over the corruption of the time, the plan itself has not been updated as government has evolved. Amendment 3 would bring some much need reforms to the Missouri Plan.
Amendment 3 was placed on the ballot by Senate Joint Resolution 51 which was discussed, debated and passed by both the Missouri Senate and the Missouri House. Currently, the panel for our states highest judges are proposed by a commission made up of lawyers and laypersons. As the process works today, the majority of members on this commission are lawyers, some of which will more than likely have cases pending before the exact judges that they are putting forth to the Governor for selection. The most important aspect of Amendment 3 is that it will change the structure of the commission ensuring a majority of laypersons make up the commission while still including lawyers and a former judge who would be present to advise the commission when questions arise.
I believe that Missourians deserve accountability at all levels of government thereby ensuring governmental processes that are honest, fair, and free from improper influences. While government will never be perfect, we must do everything we can to make sure it remains accountable to the people it serves. Amendment 3 does implement some of the reforms I would like to see in the judiciary, it is better than what we have today, and it does move us closer to a fair and unbiased selection process.
As always, please feel free to call, email, or write with your ideas or concerns. The Capitol number is (573) 751-1415, my email is brad.lager@senate.mo.gov and my mailing address is Room 422, State Capitol Building, Jefferson City, MO 65101.


Straight Talk With Sam Graves - Deficits & Debt
Our 31st President Herbert Hoover once said, “blessed are the young, for they shall inherit the national debt.”  I believe that we have a responsibility to leave this country better off for the next generation. Part of that duty should include addressing this debt crisis head on, not leaving it for the next generation to worry about later.
With our national debt now totaling more than $16 trillion, that equals$50,950for every man, woman and child in the United States. The non-partisan Congressional Budget Office has warned that more borrowing and higher debt will lead to more economic hardship and less opportunity. We can no longer continue to kick trillion dollar deficits down the road.
Our country must have a credible plan to pay down our mounting debt, and it shouldn’t be a burden to job creators. This administration is proposing a massive tax increase on individuals and small businesses that will do nothing to reduce our deficit. The current proposal would hamstring small businesses and destroy more than 700,000 jobs, without cutting back our spending. It would not even make a dent in the annual budget deficits proposed by the President.
 If we do not make the tough choices now, we will be putting the burden of a weak economy and higher taxes on our children and grandchildren.  We cannot, in good conscience, accept this path for America. Please know that as your representative, I will continue to support fiscally responsible policies to lower our debt.


Post Scripts - Innocence and Senselessness....
If there is anything I know about children... and I am by far any authority on children.. I know children are innocent.
I know they are born into this world...helpless...dependent... and while needy and born with an instinctive cry for having those needs met...
They are innocent.
God gave us the gift of procreation and of bringing new life into this world. He gave us the charge of raising these children in a world that is full of danger and evil and fear. And He gave us the honor of representing Him to those who are a born into this world just as he gifts the artist with creating something beautiful from a pallette of colors or a lump of clay.
They are the beginning of a life that has yet to be explored. Bugs that have yet to be caught in a Mason jar. Rocks to skip. Bicycles to take apart and put back together.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms - The Rage Virus
There’s yet another new addition to our menagerie, the most useless of all creatures on the farm: a Boxer dog. There’s no doubt she belongs here in the asylum with the rest of us lunatics of the four- and two-footed variety.
You’d love her. Snow white and the smallest, most petite Boxer girl we’ve ever had. My wife found her, and I have suspicions about her intentions because the new dog, Lilly, never lets me out of sight. She’s part spy and part baby-sitter set upon me by my ever vigilant wife, and not without reason as you’ll see by the end of this column. I hope to put some pictures of her on the Faux Farms blog and maybe even a video of her doing what we’ve come to call The Piggy Dance. It goes something like this.
First I start snapping my fingers, first one hand and then the other, faster and faster. This gets her good and riled up and she starts yipping and prancing about. Then the coup de grace as I sound out a pig call that rivals any hoots and hollers from a Razorback fan. When I ramp up the “WEEE-WEEE!” calls, Lilly loses it and starts launching herself straight in the air from a flat footed position. Sadly, though, it brings back memories of the family curse.


Debt and Overspending
Our founding fathers, the visionaries that they were, knew that to establish national debt would hinder economic growth and opportunities for our nation. In fact, James Madison once said, “I go on the principle that a public debt is a public curse.” A lot of folks in Washington don’t seem to understand that we are spending money we just don’t have.
In fiscal year 2012, the federal government spent 44% percent more money than it took in. To put that in everyday terms, for every $7 in revenue we have spent $11. The Congressional Budget office confirmed, this month, that we have exceeded a $1 trillion dollar deficit for the fourth year in a row.
This kind of spending and debt is not only reckless and irresponsible but also dangerous to economic recovery. It has some in Washington calling for increased government revenue through higher taxes on individuals and small businesses. Most anyone with common sense would you tell you that raising taxes in a bad economy is a recipe for disaster.
I have long believed that government does not have a revenue problem, it has a spending problem. That’s why I voted for a plan that would balance the budget in 10 years. This plan makes common sense spending cuts like repealing Obamacare, freezing federal spending, and most importantly, it puts our nation on a sustainable path toward paying down the debt.
I do not believe we should ask taxpayers to finance more overspending. We should do what Missouri families do in these tough economic times – do more with less.
Sincerely, Sam Graves


Post Scripts - The changing landscape
The changing landscape...
I suppose there’s no great revelation or wisdom in this, but I really had a profound thought: The longer you’re around on this earth, the more you see things change.

With the passing of Jim Eames, my world as I know it is forever changed.

Even though Jim has been rather scarce these past few years, I know that the Rotary Club has included him frequently. I have missed seeing him on his early morning walks for quite some time, and it’s been years since I’ve been here when he stopped in the newspaper office to share a story.

Jim Eames is Lathrop to me. His stories of his beloved Imogene, his benevolent respect for his father-in-law, the late Oral Robison, and his days of working at his grain elevator. I remember his stories of riding the train from Converse to see his sweetheart, and the twinkle in his eye when he was trying to be make his point without ever coming close to what you could take as a judgement.

Jim Eames represents the Lathrop of my establishment years. The early years when I was establishing roots and a sense of home. “The house that built me.”

It makes me reflect on a number of people that shaped and formed my knowledge of Lathrop. Tom Williams, Jim Mathis, Reed Gerber (even though he was a proud transplant, he was a part of my foundation). Paul Gustin, Jim Baskett. Gladys Lee. Dorothy Cross.

I know there are so many more that I should recall, but the list keeps growing longer.

My history is even shorter than so many others... but the Cross building on Oak Street leaves a hole in the landscape. As will the water tower in the park, should it be removed.

We are better than this, people. We are better than being reminiscent of better days that have passed. We are better than just accepting falling into a lull of mediocrity.

I find myself wrestling with the passion and enthusiasm that once caused me to bounce out of bed each morning to go change the world. I find myself turning into the generation that I once dismissed because their first answer was always, “We tried that once, it didn’t work.”

I know there are wonderful things taking place out here in our world. I know that Booster Clubs keep chugging along. I know Rotary Clubs keep breathing life into proud traditions. And I know that every election year, eager, fresh ideas seek to gain the support of voters and give them the opportunity to serve and make a difference.

While the landscape changes, and with it the faces and places that provide a home for our families and businesses, we continue to place hope in some magic answer to all our woes. Whether it is a business, or a cause, or a public facility or agency, it all begins with us. It all begins with an idea and a conversation that leads to a solution.

Great Northwest Day at the Capital is upon us again. I mention it because even though I know there are not a lot of bodies involved in making this happen, it is an effort that attempts to cross community lines and look at our county as a whole.

We had a great beginning with the Economic Development Council of Clinton County. There was terrific enthusiasm and great intent. The EDCCC still meets, and one can’t help but shake our head at the awful dismantlement that took place over the incidents of the former director.

But it doesn’t mean it wasn’t a good idea. It doesn’t mean we still don’t need it. It doesn’t mean it still can’t be an effective mechanism for our growth.

But it is not going to happen if we continue to focus on the past. It is not going to happen if we don’t participate in our local government, leadership, and business communities.

We have a wonderful history, but we have to be willing to look beyond our history and set a vision for our future.

I think the greatest visionaries are ones that are willing and able to say, “Either lead, follow, or get out of the way.”

A changing landscape doesn’t have to be sorrowful. A changing landscape can also be one of new growth and life.

I think Jim was one that believed anything was possible. I think that is legacy worth striving to leave.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms - Faux Farms: Farm Repost
Someone wrote once, “a writer needs to write” and like a great line from a movie it just stuck with me. So, off we go with this week’s farm report and a special thanks to the Rural Reporter for re-instating the flakiest columnist ever to disgrace a printed page! If that sounds humble and contrite, it is. Writers should write the way farmers (real ones, that is) should farm, because not using God’s gifts makes one sick inside. But this isn’t CSI: Artist’s Therapy, it’s supposed to be fun, so let’s get to it.

Alpacas? Check. Sheep? Check, in fact the stork brought us a little lamb (or “wittle wamb” as I call him) and he practices head-butting on animals 4x his size. Chickens? Check, but the henhouse looks like something from a nightmare and the feathered ladies lay their eggs at random, making every day Easter. Rabbits? Err, checked off, but that’s another story. Goats? Grrr, we don’t talk about the goats much. Our solo three-legged cow, Eileen? Check. Farm dogs? Check. And of course, turkeys.


Letters to the Editor - Reader: “Crenshaw is a man of integrity.”
Dear Editor:
The Oct. 4th issue of The Kearney Courier there was an article regarding a lawsuit against James Crenshaw. Anyone that knows Mr. Crenshaw knows that this lawsuit is pure nonsense.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms - Faux Farms: Part Deux
by S. Daily Warren

Well, where have I been? My boss said it best when she asked, “What do I tell people? That you’ve been teaching purple monkeys how to wash dishes for the Peace Corps?” Close enough, and bless her for a little honest humor. But if that doesn’t suffice, I’ve been working at being the worst salesman imaginable in this unimaginable economy, but now I’m happy to be writing again.
There are so many things to report back to you, but above all…our new COW! Yes, you heard right, Faux Farms now has a cow. A real cow too, not one of those mechanical jobs they ride down in Texas. She’s great, our new heifer, but not as great as the gal that named her. My trailblazing pioneer of perfection, that one and only better ¾’s of mine, took it upon herself to bequeath our new bovine with a proper moniker, but I’ll save that for the end.


Post Scripts - Short on space, so I’ll be brief.
Of course, the only time I have sewer issues is on the weekend-right? I am thankful for Garry Paul and Cooters Plumbing for helping me out, after a long day of being at the football fields with his little Mule(s).


Straight Talk With Sam Graves - School Lunch Decisions
Thomas Jefferson said, “that government is best which governs the least.” Unfortunately, Washington sometimes thinks it knows better than people outside the Capitol. Recent changes in our school lunch programs are a prime example of another government overreach.
The federal government expanded the school lunch program in 1933 during the Great Depression. Our state first got help when schools in Southwest Missouri received government loans to help with labor costs to prepare meals. Now, that helping hand has grown to account for $14.3 billion in government spending nationwide.
In an effort to fight childhood obesity, new guidelines have cut portion sizes for protein and grains in lieu of bigger, mandatory servings of fruit and vegetables. These calorie limits have resulted in hungry kids and trash cans overflowing with uneaten fruits and vegetables.
Telling a teenage athlete they can’t go back for seconds is simply not a decision for the government to make. What’s more, many schools were already taking steps to encourage better eating habits by offering the freedom to choose as much fruits and vegetables as a child wants.
Federal funds account for hundreds of thousands of dollars for school districts’ lunch budgets each year. But if they don’t follow the new guidelines, local schools are at risk of losing that much-needed money.
We have many strong schools in the Sixth Congressional District because we have educators and parents who know what’s best for their students. I want to make sure that Washington red tape doesn’t get in their way of making sensible decisions.
Sincerely,
Sam Graves


Lager Capitol Report - The First Presidential Debate
By Brad Lager
The 2012 campaign for President is underway as both candidates are running TV and radio ads targeted at solidifying their base and working to convince the undecided voters that they are the right person for this important job. As this process continues to intensify over the next four weeks, the voters around our nation and our state will be taking time to learn about the candidates, their beliefs, and where they want to take our nation. One great opportunity to listen and learn about the candidates occurred last week as the first of three debates between the two Presidential candidates occurred.
While the first debate focused on domestic policy with emphasis on the economy, more than 67 million viewers tuned in to listen and learn. I personally find it encouraging that viewer ship was the largest in over 30 years and these figures did not count individuals who watched the debate outside of their homes (at work, at a gathering, etc) nor did it account for individuals who watched online. This positive sign indicates that more Americans understand the importance of this election and are working to better understand the candidate’s positions so they can make an informed decision on the November ballot.
In just under a month, the voters of our state and our nation will have the opportunity to decide what type of leaders we want and whether we want bigger or better government. The decisions made over the next month will have long lasting impacts on our state and our nation. Now more than ever, we need elected officials who are committed to fiscal responsibility, government accountability, and economic prosperity. We need public servants who understand that they work for the people and not the other way around. Most importantly, I hope that Missouri’s voters will put people above politics and cast their vote for the candidates they believe have the best chance of making our nation and our state a better place to work, live, raise a family, and watch them grow.
As always, please feel free to call, email, or write with your ideas or concerns. The Capitol number is (573) 751-1415, my email is brad.lager@senate.mo.gov and my mailing address is Room 422, State Capitol Building, Jefferson City, MO 65101.


Post Scripts - 2017--The Future’s So Bright-We Gotta Wear Shades!
I had the most amazing revelation Monday, sitting at the new bakery and deli in Cameron for lunch.

The Draggin Dragon on 3rd Street in Cameron was a lovely place to enjoy lunch with my Partner-in-Great-Northwest-Days-Crime-Kate Long, and former Lathropian-turned-Cameron Chamber Executive Director Michelle (Carney sp?) Fagerstone.

Kate is the “outsider” that looks at Clinton County and says, “Holy cow... look what you’ve got! Look what you could be! Look how many things need to be done! Let’s roll!!!!”


Post Scripts - This bug gets around!
For years and years, I have believed that I was doomed to be sick every September. For as far back as I can remember, I was always ailing of some sort of “summer cold” on my birthday.

Then suddenly, as if the cold and flu elves totally forgot where I lived, it stopped.

For about the past ten years, I have managed to get through September without the dreaded “summer cold”. Ah ha! Free at last! Free at last! Thank God Almighty, free at last!


Post Scripts - Time to change... again
I know no one really wants to hear about all the escapades in my life, but if you’re still with me, maybe I can find some wisdom in all this craziness by the end of these 14” of copy.

When I sit here and think about this journey of parenthood you have so patiently shared with me, I realize that when I started the newspaper in 1996, Nick was still 7, Hailey was 5, and Katie was 3 years old.


Post Scripts - Figures lie and liars figure
Isn’t that how the saying goes? I know I’ve heard it at least a few time, and if you’ve ever listened to the commentators of a baseball game, you know that there are statistics for every imaginable situation.


Straight Talk With Sam Graves - Our Second Amendment Rights
Our Second Amendment states “A well-regulated Militia being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.” In 1789, this and the other original amendments were drafted by James Madison. Known as the Bill of Rights, they were ratified 1791 and still hold true today.

It seems every year there’s another attempt in Congress to weaken our Second Amendment rights. Gun control bills come in all shapes and sizes. One that we’ve seen often would create a national registry for guns. Some would have this not just apply to new gun purchases, but also to firearms that you already own.

I consider myself a friend of responsible and law-abiding gun owners, and believe the rights of these individuals need to be preserved. Those who plan to use guns for illegal purposes are unlikely to register them. That means a registry would only serve as a way for the government to infringe upon the rights of those who legally own firearms. The simple fact is, limiting gun rights won’t keep criminals from using them.

Our Bill of Rights was written to limit the government’s role in our lives and keep it from becoming too powerful. I will actively and aggressively fight every attempt to weaken any of the amendments to the Constitution. The right to keep and bear arms is as fundamental as the right to free speech.


Post Scripts - Face-book-offia
By Pauli Clariday

I couldn’t think of a better word for it. Is it rude to take a hiatus off Facebook and not make an announcement you are doing so? I have seen several folks make that announcement, but then just the other day I saw someone return that said they hadn’t been on in ages.

Unfortunately, I didn’t miss her. Not that she’s not a good pal...but with all the noise, I just didn’t notice.


Confessions of an Olympic Junkie
By Norma Ward
Alright, I’ll admit it. I’m an Olympic junkie with over 30 hours still on my DVR of the Summer Games. I’ve been trying to keep up with all the current events and will save the taped events for the weeks before the new prime time schedule comes out.


Post Scripts - 8/9
By Pauli Clariday
August Primary is over. Whether you had winners or losers, if you showed up to vote, you did what you are called to do.


Letter to the Editor - Jason Rogers
Hello.
I am writing this in regards to a friend of mine that recently passed away. Officer Jason Rogers, lost his battle with cancer July 12th, and your paper did a wonderful story with pictures of his “escort” home for his final days.
I went to school with this gentleman, and he was a good friend of mine in High school. I was wondering how I might be able to get a copy of your newspaper with your story regarding Jason.
Thank you also, so much for a very touching story. The pictures were very moving. Your paper did a wonderful job of saluting a very big hearted gentleman. I would love to have a copy of this if it is possible.
Thank you so much for your time. Jason will be truly missed by all.
Sincerely,
Brenda K. Rhodes
(former classmate of Jason)


Post Scripts 8/2 - “It’s not about the truth. It’s about what you can prove.”
That’s a sad statement, isn’t it? Sounds like the kind of stuff that makes lawyers rich and law enforcement crazy.
What a week this has been, and what an awful time for Carol Thompson’s family and loved ones. Rumors have run amuck this last week, and the frustration level has never been higher.


Letter to the Editor 8/2 - Where is the Clinton County Jail ballot issue?
To the Editor,
Over five years ago, on July 18, 2007, I was one of about a dozen Clinton County citizens who agreed to serve on the Clinton County jail committee at the request of the county commissioners. On December 14, 2007, the committee released our findings and recommendations in a letter to the commissioners, stating that a replacement facility needed to be built very soon. Our recommendations were published in December 2007 for public inspection.


Letter to the Editor 8/2 - Cameron man supports Elliott
The election of competent judges is one of the most fundamental rights and indeed an obligation that we voters have. It is judges who punish those who would harm us and strive to protect the citizens and indeed our way of life.


Letter to the Editor 8/2 - No complaint filed in Polo zoning hearing
Letter to Editor,
We would like to clarify incorrect statements made in the article regarding Polo’s Pawn Shop in the July 26th issue. A “neighbor” did not file a complaint against Red’s Pawn Shop as stated in the article.


Post Scripts - Remember.... This....Family
How many of you remember this? Can you guess what year? What family?

It was the 2005 Friendship Festival. The last FF David Thompson ever saw... and boy, did he leave his mark!

If you look carefully, the entire Thompson clan was with this monstrosity of a space ship that David built. Corey is dangling from the front, and the crowd is smiling from ear to ear.

Remember this family.


Straight Talk With Sam Graves - Repealing the Health Care Law
I have always believed that a government should do a few things and do them well. However in the last few years, it seems we are far exceeding our quota. The federal government has been deeply involved in the auto business and with several banks. Now with the recent Supreme Court ruling, we can add health care to that list.

Recent reports from the Congressional Budget Office indicate the health care bill will cost taxpayers $2 trillion just in the first ten years. Statistics also show about 72 million people losing their current healthcare coverage as a result.

There is no doubt in my mind that after the bill’s 21 tax increases take effect and insurance premiums rise, Americans’ demand for repealing this law will grow even more intense. There is a better way. That’s why, last week, the House passed a measure to repeal this unworkable law.

This health care law has too much taxation, too much regulation, and too many mandates. I think we need a common sense approach that would allow insurance companies to compete across state lines and let small businesses pool together to get better insurance rates.

Healthcare is a serious issue that deserves time, research, and applicable solutions. But it’s not a solution if it ends up costing patients more and our country going farther into debt. The Supreme Court may have ruled the health care law constitutional, but that does not mean it’s wise.


Lager Capitol Report - The Future of Healthcare-Which Path Will We Choose?
By Brad Lager
An affordable high quality healthcare system is vital to the future of our state and our nation. As the cost for healthcare has sky-rocketed, it has placed an enormous financial strain on our economy causing both employers and employees to have fewer dollars available to meet their financial needs. While we all agree it is time to find sustainable solutions to our healthcare crisis, the path to these solutions may become one of the most important decisions of our lifetime.

For decades, our nation has struggled to deal with the growing financial demands place upon our economy by the exploding cost of healthcare. To date, the solution to this crisis has been governmental mandates forcing doctors and hospitals to treat patients regardless of whether or not they are willing to pay, creating greater government mandates for insurance companies (which drives up costs), and expanding the eligibility limits of government programs aimed at providing healthcare at little to no costs for those who qualify. Although the intentions may have been noble, the results have been devastating. Today, most providers experience tremendous cost shifts forcing them to use the proceeds of private paying customers (both insurance and personal paid) to cover the costs of those who will not pay and the shortfall of governmental funded programs which normally pay the provider at a rate below their costs. This practice has resulted in extraordinary cost increases (for example, an aspirin that cost $5) to the point that we as a nation can no longer afford this direction.

The alternative is a path that empowers individuals with more information about their health conditions, the quality of their healthcare providers, and the costs of their decisions. It is a path that aligns the financial decisions of individuals with the costs of healthcare and then trusts people to make the best decisions for themselves and their families. Quite simply, the alternative path will empower individuals to be informed consumers who will make decisions based on their needs.

The current path is not working and if we keep doing what we are doing, we are going to keep getting what we have been getting. If we do not change directions, we are at risk of creating a healthcare environment that stifles innovation and advancement. It is time to get government out of the way and empower individuals in a competitive healthcare market.

As always, please feel free to call, email, or write with your ideas or concerns. The Capitol number is (573) 751-1415, my email is brad.lager@senate.mo.gov and my mailing address is Room 422, State Capitol Building, Jefferson City, MO 65101.


Conservation Comments
The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) is offering a free workshop in September to help landowners, hunters and others manage private land for deer. Workshop topics will include: creating or improving habitat for deer and other wildlife; developing a deer-management plan; estimating deer numbers, ages and how many deer land can support; using camera surveys and other data; deer biology, antler growth and breeding behavior; MDC cost-share opportunities, and more.

ST. JOSEPH -- Sept. 8, noon - 4 p.m.
Missouri Western State University Kemper Recital Hall in Spratt Hall, 4525 Downs Drive To register, call 816-271-3100.

For more information on managing private land for deer and other wildlife, visit mdc.mo.gov and search “deer management”.


Be Our Guest
The opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Lathrop Publishing.

Dorothy was right. “There’s no place like home.” And Rural Development concurs.

But, extraordinary as Dorothy’s Wizard-of-Oz situation was, it was almost easier for her to find her way home than it is today for some to buy a home.

Most everyone knows Dorothy’s tale, but what’s your “no place like home” story? Maybe you live in the same home where you grew up. Maybe you inherited your residence. Or, as is common in agricultural employment, your home might be considered part of your compensation. What did it take for you to own your first home? Or, have you never bought or built a home?

And what, you may wonder, do these questions have to do with Rural Development? The answer is: Housing for rural communities is the largest of all of our Rural Development programs. In fact, our housing programs have played a vital role ensuring that rural residents enjoy the same homeownership opportunities that are available to urban and suburban residents since 1949. Over the past three years, we have assisted 19,582 rural Missouri households with the purchase of their home!

What are some of the stories that we have highlighted in June to celebrate National Homeownership Month?

Amy Mayse and her two children purchased their first home in Macon, Missouri, in 2006 with the assistance of USDA Rural Development Direct Loan funding. It was a split-level home with stairs everywhere. About four years ago, as her son was entering preschool, he was diagnosed with Muscular Dystrophy. Each year her son’s condition has become progressively worse with wheel chair usage becoming mandatory. This made it necessary for the family to find a single story home. Ms. Mayse contacted USDA Rural Development to apply for another loan and was determined eligible. Ms. Mayse sold her split-level home and with Rural Development’s assistance, provided a better environment for her son. They moved into their new home this year.

Brett and Clary Flaugher of Eldon, Missouri, are young adults with special needs who have, through their efforts and strong support from their family, pastor, employers and representatives of the Miller County Board of Disabled Adults, realized a dream of homeownership and living independently.

Lonnie Crisp of Caulfield, Missouri, is legally blind. He had been living in an older mobile home which needed major repairs. The actual cost of repairs exceeded what would have been feasible to spend on the existing dwelling. Mr. Crisp was determined eligible to receive funds for construction of a 2 bedroom home. After he moved in, he found it difficult to get to his existing storm cellar so his neighbor assisted the contractor construct a pipe rail from the back steps of his new home to his storm cellar. Now Mr. Crisp can quickly and safely take shelter from severe storms as well as reside in a safe, new home.

Those are just a few of the recent examples where Rural Development has played a vital role in expanding and preserving the foundation for a stronger and more prosperous rural America and a stronger overall economy.

USDA Rural Development has two home loan programs available to buyers looking for homes in communities with less than 20,000 people. We can guarantee fixed rate loans with their lender or offer a direct loan for those who qualify. Neither program requires a down payment or mortgage insurance premiums, while offering the security of a long term loan with a fixed interest rate at record low levels.

There are many positive statistics about homeownership and the economic activity that it generates. But what can’t be measured is the pride one feels and the level of determination that exists in maintaining one’s own home. And Missouri USDA Rural Development is proud to be a partner with nearly 6,000 rural home buyers every year.

So whether you are waiting till the cows come home or the chickens come home to roost; whether you are in the home stretch or sliding into home; whether you are bringing home the bacon or making yourself at home, Dorothy was right… “There’s no place like home!”


Post Scripts - Freedom and Bravery by Pauli Clariday
Post Scripts - Freedom and Bravery by Pauli Clariday

With Independence Day behind us, and temperatures out of the triple digits, we have many, many things to be thankful for... and many, many things that give us reason to pause.

Officer Jason Rogers’ service to his country and to our community is being honored this Saturday, July 14 at a celebration of his life at his home at 601 Center Street. This will be a bittersweet time. One that those who knew him best will celebrate the life they shared with him, while at the same time, say goodbye to a kind, brave man.

Before the fireworks display, Vickie Eads announced that the Fire District’s display was in honor of one of their fallen firefighters, Phillip Tolle. The closing display, choreographed to “Taps” was a solemn reminder of the brave men and women who protect our lives, our country, and our freedom every day.

And yet, we sit here with a missing friend, Carol Thompson, that none of us can seem to do enough to help bring her back home.

Bravery is one of those things that you can’t put in a box, because it takes a different shape and form for any given circumstance. It may literally be about putting your life on the line and serving our country in dangerous situations. Our Issac Jackson fought for his country with that kind of bravery, as have many other young men and women from our area.

Bravery may be holding the family together when collectively you’re faced with the unknown and would much rather fall apart.

Bravery may be facing your final days with dignity and pride, and acceptance.

I’ve never been brave like any of those things... but I’ve been brave in other ways. They all seem pretty insignificant at this point, though, and anything I’ve ever considered myself having done that warranted some recognition is paled by the shining light of these brave men and women.

And so... perhaps... I need not be in a place where I find myself falling short in this area or that... but perhaps it is a place to simply be humble.

I am humbled and blessed that God has given these amazing people courage and strength. I am beside myself with awe in the fortitude of our human nature. God has given us all a measure of faith... the Bible says even as a mustard seed. Even as tiny as a mustard seed is, it is indelible and bears the mightiest branches known to us. Even, as once told to me, not even all the darkness in Kemper Arena at night could put out the light of a single lit match... that faith is everlasting.

Sometimes, it’s just that tiny seed... or that tiny flame... that we have to hold on to. Sometimes, it seems like the floods come or the wind blows... but that seed will still produce fruit... that flame will still light the room.

There are people much braver than I. People much more giving than I, and people whose lives will leave marks on our hearts forever.

When we are faced with our own humanity... our own mortality... what else is there? It’s not about stuff... it’s not about achievements or accomplishments. It’s about how your light shined on others. About how you were able to plant a seed in someone else’s life.

You don’t have to be a saint or a warrior to do those things. You have to be kind. You have to appreciate and be thankful. You have to serve, and you have to care.

I have seen that in Jason’s life. I saw that in Carol’s life. I know it was in Phillip’s life, and it was evident in Issac’s life.

I am free because of someone else’s bravery. I am thankful because of someone else’s courage. I am humbled by someone else’s service, and I am encouraged by someone else’s faith.

Thank you to everyone that touches my life in some way.


Post Scripts - Insurance
By Pauli Clariday
Insurance...
Six years ago, I walked into a new job that I really couldn’t believe I was walking into.

Communications Specialist at an insurance company.

Mind you, I had been running the paper for 10 years by then, and held a few temporary jobs before that. It had been twenty years since I’d worked at a business with more than three employees, and never at a financial institution where numbers and finances were the sustenance of the operation... let alone something as conservative and boring as insurance.

I knew I had a learning curve before me. I’d barely kept my car insurance current, and quite honestly, never gave it much thought. (I later learned I was what is known in the insurance world as a “tagger”... one who gets their insurance to get their plates, then lets it drop.) I am way past that now.


SliceOf1Life’sBlog - A Son Goes to Work
By Katherine Bennett Seifner
Visit Kathy’s blog at http://sliceof1life.wordpress.com/

Posted on July 2, 2012
When my son was sixteen he was diagnosed with a form of schizophrenia called schizo-atypical personality disorder. This disorder is usually a precursor to schizo-affective disorder and can lead to full blown schizophrenia. A full schizophrenic break typically happens post-adolescence and in a person’s early twenties, and if treated properly, it can be managed. If not properly managed it is heartbreaking and terrible for the victim of schizophrenia and for his or her family.


Post Scripts - 6/7
By Pauli Clariday

Is it the lazy dayx of summer yet?


Letters to the Editor 6/7 -Turney Resident
The opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Lathrop Publishing.

Dear Editor,
Last Friday, I was on my way to Stewartsville and had some extra time, so thought I’d take a little drive through Turney. I lived there about 35 years ago and really loved the little village. I was SHOCKED.


Letters to the Editor 6/7 - It is Great to Work with Young Adults
It is Great to Work with Young Adults!
Another successful Lathrop FFA Trap Season has ended. In Area I Lathrop placed 4th, 2nd and 3rd were a tie and 2 1/2 points ahead of Lathrop. There were 13 teams in Area I. Three of our 12 shooters placed in the top 15 shooters, Jason VanHorn, Tyler Jones and Zack Donelson. A closer look shows 3 more shooters would finish in the top 25, James Filley, Jake Shrewsbury and Matt Newhouse.


Fe, Fi, Faux Farms - Faux Farms: A Final Farewell
“May the winds be at our backs, and may fortune favor the foolish.” – various authors

It’s been said that everything that has a beginning has an end, and this final installment of Faux Farms as published in the wonderful Rural Reporter holds that truth to be self-evident. It’s been a most excellent journey, and the souls in Clinton County I’ve encountered (and hopefully entertained) have been of the kindest sort. You see, a call has been issued to me and I must answer it. But first, let me tell you one last story.


Fe, Fi, Faux Farms - Faux Farms: Foxy Fiends and Clumsy Cowboys
by S. Daily Warren

But first, the farm report!
We lost 4 turkeys over the last week. It seems we have a visitor, a sly fox of the reddish-brown and turkey-loving variety. Bold little booger, comes out in broad daylight and hangs by the chicken coop, but the encounter was interesting for other reasons.


Post Scripts - Eight states in two weeks...
Wow.. that makes it sound like I’m just a little bit busy-you think?

If you count Missouri (and all four corners at that), and Kansas, Iowa, Tennessee, Arkansas, Mississippi, Nebraska and South Dakota, that’s eight states from May 9 to May 24th. That’s one work conference, six ball games, three hotel rooms, five interstates, gumbo, sushi, Mississippi catfish, and a half dozen raw oysters. Not to mention a few glasses of Lazy Magnolia Southern Pecan... a local brew down south.


Fe, Fi, Faux Farms - Faux Farms: Friends from Afar
Having been told in no uncertain terms by Charlie “Socrates” Dawson that reading my column is like getting a root canal, I did what any heartbroken hombre would have done and took a part time job. After writing this someone will have to pick Charlie up off the floor, for he’s surely fainted that I’m now doing an honest day’s work.


Post Scripts - M-I-Crooked Letter-Crooked Letter
Mississippi? I never thought I would find a good reason to go to Mississippi, but now I have one! Mom and I are headed off to the Magnolia State, and if its nickname is any indication of its fragrance, it will be quite a treat!


Fe, Fi, Faux Farms
by S. Daily Warren
For those of you who don’t know yet, I love my wife in a way that makes Romeo look like a drunken wife-beater from the dingiest trailer park (nothing against trailer parks; I lived in one myself once). She is my jewel, my treasure, the song in my heart and the star in my sky. She’s also wicked cute, especially with her new pixie haircut from the salon in Plattsburg. She is also, without a doubt, more fun than a bag of monkeys, and a good sport.


Conservation Comments: Leaves of Three? Leave Them Be!
Having thoroughly enjoyed our early and long spring as I am sure many of you have, I went for another nice walk today. While passing along a forested edge, I could not help but notice the numerous three leaved plants dotting the area…Poison Ivy. All parts of the poison ivy plant contain the oil which causes the dreaded itch, including the smoke from burning poison ivy. As with many other toxins, different people experience a variety of reactions to the oil from poison ivy. These may include; rash, itching, clear blisters, and even no reaction in some people. It is important to note that the reaction a person experiences to poison ivy can vary greatly year to year, so avoiding the plants whenever possible is the best idea. The saying, “Leaves of three, leave them be”, often comes to mind when I see poison ivy. While it is true that poison ivy has three distinct leaves and comes in either the shrub or vine form, several other non-irritating plants are often mistaken as poison ivy. To learn easy identification of poison ivy, as well as many other native Missouri plants, visit: www.mdc.mo.gov <http://www.mdc.mo.gov/> , and use the search column.

If you do come into contact with poison ivy, try to wash the affected area with soap and water as soon as possible. This will help remove the irritating oils from your skin and may lessen the symptoms. There are also commercially available products such as Tecnu, to help. You should remember that all clothing that comes into contact with poison ivy may retain the irritating oil for up to a year, so washing your clothes is also important.

While our first impression of poison ivy is that it has no use, that is not entirely true. Many animal species feed on the poison ivy plants. These include birds eating the berries and mammals eating the leaves, berries, and twigs. If you have a problem with too much poison ivy on your property, there are several herbicides available to help. More information on which herbicides to use is available on the website listed above.


Fe, Fi, Faux Farms - Fatalities and Faux Farmer Fancy-pants
Like a grim accountant during a bad economic downturn, I must occasionally report the losses on our little farm, this overpriced and underpaying petting zoo we call home. But first, the farm report…


Post Scripts - Ahhh... Community Betterment
Communicate. Collaborate. Coordinate. I remember the 3 C’s well.
We don’t always hit home runs. We don’t always strike them out. A good friend of mine tells me, “In the major leagues, a .300 average is pretty darn good!” If you think about it, that means for every three times you get up to bat, only one of those results in a base hit.


Fe, Fi, Faux Farms - Faux Farms: Favorite Sons
by S. Daily Warren
(This column is dedicated to the memory of Mat Tucker, to those who have valiantly overcome their disabilities to live a life of courage, and to all those who have stood by their side)


Post Scripts - The purpose of life...
Pretty heavy-huh? Pretty grandiose of me to title my column something that belongs above the writing from someone much more profound and philosophical than little old me.


Fe, Fi, Faux Farms - Faux Farms: Fond Farewell
by S. Daily Warren
Familiar face and former deputy and door guard of the Clinton County Courthouse Jim Banks officially retired last week and this writer will sure miss seeing his mug at the courthouse door…but first, the Faux Farms Report!


Post Scripts - Over the hump...
By Pauli Clariday
It’s April 24. One hundred fifteen days into the year, and I think I can see daylight. It’s 2012, right? Track’s coming to a close, baseball is ready to wind down, and graduation announcements are going out.


Fe, Fi, Faux Farms - Fuzzy Freedom
If community respect is currency, then that coinage will be spent in its entirety by writing this article. If I weren’t the laughing stock of Clinton County prior to this, then afterwards I surely will be.


Fe, Fi, Faux Farms - …but first, the Faux Farm Report
“I think that I shall never see…something as lovely as a goat with her head stuck in a gate.”
- Trees, by Joyce Kilmer (a rare rough draft available only on The Antique Road Show)


Post Scripts - Simplify
Why is it that at every new stage in our lives, we think that somehow it will get easier? Simpler?


Fe, Fi, Faux Farms - Faux Farms: Of Firearms and Fusspots
by S. Daily Warren
Faux Farms is finished, finis’, kaput, over and done. All livestock will be butchered and sold as stew meat, every tree harvested to make paper for those annoying credit card applications you receive in the mail, the buildings razed to the ground and the very soil remediated and replaced with either asphalt or rich Corinthian leather, depending on my mood. The Great Experiment has failed and I’m throwing in the towel. It’s been a fun run but it’s over.


Post Scripts - I’m with Spencer....
Reading Spencer’s story about the proposed Sandra Reeves project south of Plattsburg, I can’t say enough how this story deserves our attention.


Fe, Fi Faux Farms - Faux Farms: Far Reaches
by S. Daily Warren
As you know by now I come from a long, proud line of Texans, a term which Webster’s Dictionary defines as: “A person possessed of an extremely hard cranium composed of dense, impenetrable matter. See: bonehead.” Without the tenacity bequeathed to me by 6 generations of my forebears I never would have made it this long in Clinton County.


Post Scripts - It’s another Fifth Friday! Another Fifth Week!
It usually happens about four times a year. “Fifth” something or others aren’t anything new... Fifth Wheels... Fifth Quarters. But for us here at the Rural Reporter, it has been “Fifth Week’s Free” since September 2010.


Be Our Guest - HB 2011 causes concern for Council of the Blind
Hello:
As Executive Director of the MIssouri Council of the Blind, I am reaching out to express our shock and deep concern over the blind being cut from Medicaid in the House budget, HB2011. Not only are these cuts just plain wrong, they will cost the citizens of Missouri tens of millions of dollars because of a $28 million transfer. The costs will come when blind people who have no more medical benefit are forced to go to emergency rooms for treatment or to move into nursing homes when their support system is pulled out from under them.
And, this isn’t even saving Missourians any money. It’s a transfer that places the blind and higher education on a collision course, something that is completely unnecessary.
A majority in the House believes that to make up a 7.5% decrease in higher education funds, it’s ok to cut medical benefits for the blind by 80%. This is simply unfair to blind Missourians!
I want to thank you for all of your positive coverage regarding the needs of Missouri’s blind citizens. I want also to let you know we are here as a resource for you at the MIssouri Council of the Blind.
When we see that blind peoples lives could easily be lost, we do not stand idly by and do nothing. One example of our efforts is a radio ad we have sponsored in Jefferson City and Kansas City. I thought perhaps you would like to hear it.
Also, please know that we have collected many stories of real blind people who will suffer gravely if these cuts to their medical benefits are made. If these stories can be of help, please do not hesitate to ask us for them.
Thank you again for all that you do.
Sincerely,
Christopher Gray, Executive Director
Missouri Council of the Blind
Representing Missouri’s Blind for Over 50 Years
St. Louis, MO 63109


Letters to the Editor
Tragic ending for a stray kitty


From the Superintendent
School Board Elections
We have five candidates running for two school board positions in the April 3rd election. Incumbents Robin Douglas and Teona Harris have signed up for re-election. Their seats are being challenged by Tom Briscoe, Matt Holsted, and Scott Shrewsbury. We will have our “Meet the Candidates” night on Wednesday, March 28th at 7:00 in the Middle School Performing Arts Center. The candidates will answer pre-determined questions to help the public decide who will be the best fit to govern our school district in the coming years. As always, it is important that everyone get out and vote.

Board Workshops
The board has decided to hold a monthly workshop on the 4th Wednesday of each month. The first workshop will be on March 28th at 6:00 p.m. prior to the “Meet the Candidates” event. The topic for this first work session will be next year’s budget. We will look at everything having to do with the budget and try to set some priorities.

Student Success
The high school students have been very active over the last couple of months and have had many award recognitions from Academic All-Staters and State FFA Degrees to Poetry, Art, and Speech Contest winners. We sure have some talented kids in our school. Be sure to check out our web-site, www.lathropschools.com, to keep up with all of our award winning students!

Budget for 2012-2013
We still have no idea how much funding we will get from the state for next year. The estimates range from losing $200,000 to gaining $300,000. As you can imagine, this makes for an interesting time in preparing next year’s budget. Locally, our county assessor is telling us to plan for no decrease in assessed valuation, but no increase either. In this economy, we will be happy to get the same amount as we did this year. Without cuts, we will still have to deficit spend, which I think we can comfortably do for one more year.

Early Childhood and Kindergarten Screening
Early Childhood and Kindergarten screening will be March 27 – 30. All children, ages 3 months through 5 years, that live in the Lathrop School district are encouraged to attend and receive a free developmental screening, as well as hearing, vision, dental and immunization checks. Evening appointments are available on the 27th and 29th. Kindergarten screening is for children that turn 5 prior to August 1, 2012. Preschool screening is for children that turn 4 prior to August 1, 2012. Please call 528-7765 to schedule appointments.


Fe, Fi, Faux Farms
From inside the warm, dark confines of the incubator a small chirp is heard. The fragile egg, baking slowly at 99.5 degrees for twenty and a half days now, gives off the smallest wobble. Lori and I are watching, all smiles, and even though we’ve brought nearly 16 baby chicks into this world, the moment never seems to lose its magic.


Post Scripts - Spring has sprung!
I almost feel guilty. Like I haven’t paid my Missouri-born-dues of suffering through four months of miserably cold weather.


Straight Talk With Sam Graves
Missouri Coal Can Help Ease Energy Crunch
Missouri has a long history of producing coal. In fact, the Show Me state was the first state West of the Mississippi to produce coal for commercial use. When it comes to the generation of electricity in the United States, about half of that power is provided by coal.

The coal industry is booming. The United States is one of the world’s largest exporters of coal. According to the Energy Information Administration, there is enough coal to last for the next 200 years.

Most of that coal, though, is headed to Asia. American demand for coal has been slowed down by costly regulations from the federal government. Missouri sits on large reserves of coal, which is a cheap and abundant source of energy.

The current administration has said they want to make building a coal plant so expensive that it will bankrupt the company. With a flurry of new regulations, they are moving toward that goal. Just this month, five coal-fired power plants announced they would shut down.

I believe we need to be pursuing an all-the-above strategy towards energy. Coal is a part of the solution, along with natural gas, renewable fuels, nuclear, conservation and increased oil exploration. Instead of trying to bankrupt energy companies, we need to embrace all of the options.

When it comes to easing our energy crunch, there are no easy gimmicks. We must continue to increase the amount of American energy by using our own natural resources.
Sincerely,
Sam Graves


Letter to the Editor


Bits About 'Em
Good morning and Happy Valentine’s Day!
The sun is shining and looking great after the gloomy snow, but we did need it. I guess it is going to rain later in the week, which is also needed.
We have a senior luncheon at the Assembly of God Church on Friday, the 17th. All seniors are welcome! On Saturday, from 4:30-6:00, a chili and soup benefit will be held for a needy family. Hope to see you at both!
Let’s continue to pray for Godly leadership for our country, plus our service men & women and Israel; and, of course, each other. Special prayers go out for the Stamper family for the loss of their precious Austin. Remember, God loves you!


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms
Rabbits, alpacas, sheep milk and trademark composting? As far as journalism is concerned, Woodward and Bernstein I ain’t! But I sure have a lot of fun sharing the experiences of country life and most especially getting to know the people.

As mentioned last week, Grumpy Felts is a local rabbit guru and it’s his terminology I borrowed when I mentioned “Buzzy Funnies”. He’s right; they’re a hoot and a half. We’re rapidly nearing the day when we can let buck meet doe and put them all in one big box and let nature take her course.


Post Scripts
It’s time to turn the corner...
The School Board adopted the 2012-2013 calendar with the 4-day schedule. Period. That took a majority. The catch is, the motion to accept the calendar simply had a recommendation to consider an alternative schedule..with the approval of administration... in the event that the results of the 2012 MAP scores were undesirable.

The vote was 4-3 to adopt the calendar with provisions. Evans, Wright, Harris, and Morgan yea. Maddick, Barrett, and Douglas nay.

Do we not agree what is indicative of success?


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
What will we get today - rain, snow, or sleet? Hopefully, sunshine, but not likely, according to Channel 4 news.
We do need some moisture and good cold weather to kill off all the bad germs, but I will be happy whatever we get, as it could always be worse.
Let’s put God back in charge and pray that Godly wisdom will be used once again in the leadership of our country.


Letters to the Editor
An Open Letter to the Missouri Department of Transportation:
How many people have to die at the intersection of Highways 69 and 116 before you fulfill your responsibility to make it safer? Cross Corners is a horrible name for that place but if the shoe fits…

We who live in that immediate area use that intersection every day. Monday morning one of my neighbors saw an 18-wheeler roll through it doing a “California stop”, meaning he didn’t really stop at all. And he was on his cell phone at the time. We’re not picking on truckers or necessarily on you all at MoDOT but something has to be done NOW.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms
Don’t worry, I had to look it up too. Unfortunately, I have yet to learn that there’s more to being a writer than using big words that no one knows the meaning of, so in that spirit “fugacious” means “fleeting” or “to fly”. In this context, I mean “temporary”, and although that word doesn’t start with an “F” what I mean to say is this: there’s bad news on the farm, but I’ll get back to invoking smiles as soon as I can. This shouldn’t be a problem, as we’ve added “Buzzy Funnies” to Faux Farms, courtesy of one Grumpy Felts, the Clinton County Rabbi of Rabbits.

The blessing of two baby lambs the other week was followed by a curse of a disastrous breech birth by our second pregnant ewe.


Post Scripts
Confessions of a political junkie
I can’t believe I just titled my column that. Local government interest, yes. A strong distaste for pseudo-governmental agencies, yes. But politics? As in... history... political science... national and state government? Not too long ago, I would have just either y-a-a-w-n-e-d, or I would have given my laundry list of issues that justified my affiliation.

I have a lot of friends on Facebook who have a lot of very strong political views.


Daily by the Week
When I was in fourth grade I wrote a love letter to my teacher, and she imparted to me the most valuable lesson in writing I’d been given to date: she graded it. Now you can do the same for me with a certified letter sent to the Holt Community Fire Protection District Fire Board, one that stands a good chance of being completely ignored. I encourage your responses and letters to the editor, especially those that describe why I should be dragged behind a green-broke horse through a briar patch in case you don’t dig what I have to say.


Bits About 'Em
Good Morning,
Another beautiful sunrise and a good report for today. Enjoy it while you can, I have afelling it won’t last much longer.
I don’t have much news again today, thing’s pretty quite on the home front.
I don know we need to continue to pray for Godly leadership for our country, our service folks and Israel.
Here on the home front, continue to pray for Baby LIncoln James Dawson, Annie Rose Park, cousin of Mary Ann Barnes, Vickie Eads, Dorothy Renshaw, Bonnie Fleming, Allen Rendelton, our Candy Spilman as she’s in surgery to remove her gall bladder today and Joanne Williams as she is also in surgery today for a knee replacement.
Have a good week and God Bless, Edith
****


Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor,
I am a Four Day School week supporter. A few weeks ago, I was misquoted in the paper as stating that those who do not have children in the school district are not important. I want to set the record straight. I feel everyone in this community has a voice, pays taxes, and cares about our community. My question was with regards to how the 4 day affected someone who didn’t have children in the school district. I wasn’t saying they don’t have a voice—I just wanted to know why they wanted to change something that many of the parents with children in the district support.

Most of the parents love our new 4 day schedule here at Lathrop.


Post Scripts
Oh, how I wish I could speak to this like one of you true-blue, born and bred Lathrop folks! I have only lived here 25 years, and I will never forget what Dorris Mathes told me once. “Honey, I’ve been here 40 years and I’m still a newcomer!”

But my kids are true Lathropians. Each one of them born here. Each one of them 13 year seniors. And each one of their lives touched by Mr. Bill Burns.

Mr. Burns was a fourth generation teacher, and probably touched four generations in some families here.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms
I’ve checked the fine print on all of the real estate and bank documents after our relocation to Clinton County from KC and never once have I seen the word “work” mentioned, yet to make Faux Farms work (meaning where the animals actually live and not die en masse), then “work” seems to be the magic word. That said, the following are only a few snippets taken from the busyness around the farm lately.

Cleaning the coop: suddenly, doing things in the cold doesn’t seem to be such a bad thing! It seemed a bright idea at the time to wait for this last spate of warm weather before sweeping up the chopped hay, the cracked corn and the voluminous amounts of nitrogen-based fertilizer in the chicken coop when it was above freezing.


Daily by the Week
by S. Daily Warren
Most of you know me by either my Faux Farms column or my faux reporting, but Pauli the Publisher has been a wise friend to me since day one, reigning me in and guiding me as best she could…until now. Perhaps she’ll rue the day, but she’s given me an Op-Ed column and I intend to use it just as her heart dictates: for the community. She suggested I start with an introduction.

I’ve been a writer for almost 30 years and a reporter, both freelance and full-time, for going on 20 since first being editor of my college newspaper.


Bits About 'Em
Good Morning,
Nice and warm morning, suppose to rain some Friday, we do need some rain.
Not much news again this week, I had a senior moment last night, in other words, I forgot to call. Your know how it is when your sooo old.
But let us not forget to pray for the leadership of our country and for Isarel, also each other. Sick folks this week, Dorothy Renshaw, Lincoln Dawson, Bonnie Fleming, Allen Pendelton and Anna Rose Park.
Keep Smiling, God loves you,
God Bless, Edith


Letter to the Editor
Dear Editor,
I love the four day school for several reasons. First there is consistency every day, over and over, with the same basic schedule. Children know what to expect and at what time throughout the day. I realized this past week that Lathrop’s students have the same kind of school day as I did as a child. Children who have learning problems that require help outside the regular classroom especially need the absolute consistency of the schedule. They actually react poorly when schedules are suddenly changed. In reality very few children like a change in the schedule. They like things to be at the same time all the time. At the elementary school, children will hurry from their classrooms early in the morning when they hear the music for Mule Time, scurrying to their reinforcement or enrichment classes.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms
There was blood everywhere. I was in a complete state of panic. Every lesson I’d ever learned, every ounce of combat and crisis training fled in an instant, and in a delirium I scrambled for the phone and dialed 9-1-1.

“Send everyone!” I screamed. “SWAT, EMS, Fire, rescue, LifeFlight….anyone, everyone! Quick, before it’s too late!”

“Just calm down, sir,” the dispatcher said professionally. “Take a deep breath and tell me where you are and what happened.”

“I’m at home,” panting breathlessly. “My sheep just had twins!”


Post Scripts
This is dangerous.
In six hours, I am going to be on the road to Jefferson City to participate in Great Northwest Day at the Capital.

I’m not sure, exactly, what I’m supposed to be doing there except to hopefully allow everything the GNW Day committee has been working toward the past eight months gel together and make a big impression on all our legislators, state department folks, and other communities putting their best foot forward.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
About 30 degrees colder this morning than yesterday, but with promises of a much warmer weekend. You know, with this mild winter we are having, it makes one wonder what our spring and summer will be like. There might be a shortage of water.
Let us keep praying for our country and for Godly leadership. Also for our service men and women and Israel.
Here at home, let us pray for Baby Lincoln Dawson, newborn son of Cher-iee & John Dawson; Dorothy Renshaw; Bonnie Fleming; Allen Pendleton & Vickie Eads.
Keep smiling and tell someone today that God loves them!
God bless,
Edith


Letter to the Editor
Dear Editor,
Due to the most recent incident in Turney, I am writing this letter to establish the Board’s reasons for consulting with members Mylissa Stutesman and Jimmie Christopher of the Citizen’s Oversight Committee for Clinton County.

First, they have a standing invitation to our meetings, however according to the Missouri Sunshine Law this invitation is only a formality. Second, they have advised and will continue to advise the Board on Sunshine Law issues, Parliamentary Procedure and Roberts Rules of Order. Since most of the Turney Ordinance books were never found in the transition, their advice has been invaluable to the Board and is much appreciated.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms
Faux Farms: Final Lap
by S. Daily Warren
It’s finally happened: I’ve turned the corner and have actually ceased the senseless murder of innocent fowl livestock. The chicken world can breathe a sigh of relief as Faux Farms has unlearned the grotesque and destructive lessons of city living and found a way for living things to live. In short, I think I’ve made the painful graduation from urban imbecile to baby agrarian, but I may be patting myself on the back a little strongly. Aww, to heck with it, I’m bragging anyway.

I can even run a chainsaw (no, we’re not talking about chickens anymore!


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Another fine day ahead of us. The news said this morning that it was going to get really cold by Thursday, and maybe a little skiff of snow tonight or tomorrow.
So far we have been blessed with good weather, so I won’t complain too much. I’ll just hibernate till spring, and just get out to go to church and attend the Senior Luncheon at the First Assembly of God Church every 3rd Friday of the month at 11:00! Also, the Christian Church is having supper every Wednesday night at 6:00, and everyone is welcome. A goodwill offering can be given at either church. Come and enjoy delicious food and great fellowship.
I don’t have any Bits About ‘Em this week.


Letter to the Editor
To the editor:
For eight years, I have been living my own American Dream, helping to provide for my family by pursuing a job that I love. When I remove the sharp enamel points from a horse’s teeth, I have the joy of knowing that my skills are helping that animal to live a healthier, more comfortable life while at the same time making life easier for the horse’s owner. Several licensed vets have been so impressed with the quality of my work that they recommend their own clients to me when a horse’s teeth need floating; one of those vets has even had me work on her own horse. I’ve never had a horse owner complain about the work I did for them, so I never imagined that I could have my livelihood and my passion taken away from me.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms
Faux Farms
Lori here! I’m back home and asked S. Daily for permission to write the column this week. Being the lazy bum that he is, he loved the idea.

Five weeks is a long time to be away and many things have happened around the farm. Some good, some bad and one very ugly. Yes, sadly, it involves death.


Post Scripts
It sounds like I missed a doozy at Turney Village meeting last night.

Once again, local and county law enforcement was called because of a disturbance that turned into a shouting match.

If you’ve known me long enough, you know that I’m pretty open to telling stories on myself. I figure that I don’t have any right to wag my finger at anyone. When you have one finger pointing out, you’ve got three pointing back at you…

I also struggled with whether or not to report anything about the disturbance. I asked Spencer to ask at the courthouse if there were any charges filed.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Cold and breezy this morning, but supposed to warm up by afternoon, and be nicer the rest of the week.
I made several calls last night for the Bits, but didn’t get anything. Some were not home, and others didn’t do anything for New Year’s. I didn’t either - I went to bed early. On Sunday, I cooked a big kettle of black eyed peas. Son John came up, also daughter Norma came by.


Letters to the Editor
Only my opinion,
I enjoyed reading a rather long dissertation written by a former school board member who made several comments concerning the 4 day school week and school finances. Only one of his comments could I agree with, that being “We should look at facts or actual numbers to make a decision, not our personal opinion.”

We, as a school district, are fortunate to have at least four board members who will spend time outside the board meeting to research actual records and data.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms
(Faux Farms is for entertainment purposes only. Anything written therein can’t and won’t be used against me in a court of law because I’ll just say I made it all up.)

“CLEAR!”

I placed the defibillator once more upon the victim’s chest, delivering a dose of electrical energy that might...just might...bring the living back from the brink of death.


Post Scripts
I was thinking about yard signs with that slogan on it. I think I’d have a lot of takers... you think?

I often wonder if the Letters section is a good idea or not. I remember when I started this in 1996, I referred to this 12 page (at the time) black and white newsprint-eventual-bird-cage-liner as a “forum”... a “communication vehicle.”

Over the years, it has done both a good job... and a not so good job... of serving as a mirror of the community.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Happy new year, everyone! I hope you all enjoyed Christmas as much as I did.
Let’s continue to pray for our country, Israel and service men & women.
God bless, and may each of you have a very happy and prosperous 2012.
Edith
****
Marty, Pauli & Kayla Clariday; Nick, Hailey & Katie Slibowski; Norma Ward and John Munkers were Christmas Eve dinner guests of Edith Webb.
Time was spent eating, singing and playing games and having a wonderful time.
****


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms
I was privileged to be asked by Spencer (S. Daily Warren) to fill-in at Faux Farms this week, as he goes to visit his better 3/4’s, Lori.

Spencer knew I was an old farm gal, but didn’t realize just how old of a farm hand I really am. So, I got my first look at Faux Farms this Sunday, Christmas Day, the feeding schedules for all the animals and the first meeting of said “delights”.

First there was Gus, the Farm Dog, such a beautiful Great Pyrenees and his child bride-to-be, Littles. Their greeting was a pleasure, for those who aren’t familiar with large dogs it could of been traumatizing. But I love large dogs, a few of the readers from Gower may remember our St. Bernard, Barney..


Letters to the Editor
I read with great interest Mr. Fine’s article that questions my projections, my math abilities, my integrity or all three. If he thought it was high, he could have asked for a copy and I would have been happy to share it.

What I had was a conservative projection based on facts from the Missouri Department of Education and the Clinton County Assessor - The first four houses we built had seven school age children that enrolled in Lathrop Schools. For a conservative projection, I used five students for four houses, as advised by other administrators that have experience instead of seven.

So, the first four houses in the first year produced $4,000 in tax income and $21,720 from the state of Missouri for five students.


Post Scripts
Nothing hits us as close to home as our children, our life’s work, or our pocketbook. All of these things have incredibly strong ties to our sense of being and worth. Never have I seen such a perfect storm of convictions come together as what is going on in the district right now.
From every side, we are passionate about the education our children are receiving, the professional decisions that we make and the real or perceived threat to the economic viability of our district and our community.


Notes of Whatever
by Norma Ward
Season’s Greetings! As things slow down in the news department, thought I’d take the opportunity to write an article of Notes of Whatever for this issue.

It never ceases to amaze me on how fast a year goes by or how busy I become. Looking back on the past year, it has been a busy one, one filled with basketball (last year’s successful year and the beginning of what looks to be another successful year), track, baseball, softball, volleyball, and FOOTBALL.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Looks like we are going to get some snow. Wonder if we will have a white Christmas? Remember Bing Crosby’s song, “I’m Dreaming of a White Christmas”?
Snow or no snow, my sincere wish is that everyone have a very Merry Christmas. I know it will be hard for some of us who have lost loved ones; others with no jobs or homes; or bills piling up and etc. In spite of all this, it can be a joyous time if we remember that Jesus is the reason for the season, and that better times are ahead for us in the year 2012.


Letters to the Editor
I’ve lived here for a long time and I think we should start calling the intersection of 69 Highway and 116 Cross Corners. Too many people have died there. There are three crosses standing there and now we need to add three more. On this last accident I had to deal with some of the wreckage myself, and it’s horrible and unnecessary. A simple flashing light with a solar panel hooked to it would be all the investment needed to save lives in the future.

I mean, come on.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms
I’m a writer, that’s what I do. I am so very fortunate to have the delightful job of getting paid not to shut up; a career of just blathering on and on like an idiot, and I’m probably overqualified for the job. But this time, folks, it’s you who have left me speechless and at a total loss for words. That doesn’t happen much, so I’ll do my best this week under these extraordinary circumstances.

Thank you.


Post Scripts
I am so tired of hearing about the 4-day/5-day argument, I had to leave the meeting Monday night because I had a headache.

There are opinions… passionate opinions. I do believe people care deeply about the children, and there are those that care deeply about supporting the district and the community.

So what happens when there is clearly polarization of passionate opinions? I think voters came to the polls last April and expressed their opinion.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Little wet, but rather nice. No freezing, which is A-OK by me.
I don’t have a lot of news this week, so let’s get to the serious part of this column. Pray without ceasing for our country and Israel; our President and other leaders; service men & women and others that are less fortunate than we are.
Closer to home, Allen Pendleton, Vickie Eads, Dorothy Renshaw, Gail Frazier, Dorothy Slayton and each other.
God bless,
Edith


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms
(We interrupt this broadcast for an important announcement - Faux Farms will not be shown tonight so that we can bring you this special presentation)

Tonight, on CNN…or Fox…or whatever…we bring you: Rescue Goat 5000!

Not since the heady television heyday of “T.J. Hooker” and “Joni Loves Chachi” has our network been able to broadcast entertainment tripe of this caliber. Soon to overtake such hit shows as “Jersey Shore: STDs” and “Grandma’s Gall Bladder Surgery”, Rescue Goat 5000 (RG5K) is a sure fire winner in the ratings game.


Post Scripts
Hmmmm... I like my old spot...over here on the left hand side of page two. It was really quite a big deal to me when Faux Farms took this spot, but quite honestly, I feel back at home.

I’ve really been thinking about writing a lot lately. I asked my husband, who used to ask me quite often when I was going to write my column again, what he used to like about my column.

“Well,” he said, “it was funny.”


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
I am back, and ready to be here doing what I like best - communicating with all you good folks!
I would like to thank each and every one of you for your prayers while I was in the hospital. Praise God, I am fine now, I would also like to say that Candy did a good job on my notes last week, with one exception: it was Norman Thorsen that was a guest of the Clingans for Thanksgiving; not Norma Hensen.
I spent a very delightful Thanksgiving at the home of my granddaughter, Pauli Clariday. She and her husband, Marty, prepared a feast fit for a king, or queen.


Letter to the Editor
Dear Editor,
It occurred to me Sunday while observing the congregation in morning worship just how significant this week is for us. On a Sunday morning seventy years ago, the world changed. While our parents, grandparents or even our great grandparents, here in Lathrop and our surrounding communities were leaving our 11:00 Sunday Service, or were home preparing for dinner, the world changed with the bombing of our naval fleet at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. This attack killed thousands that morning with our first being local boy, Kirby Stapleton, to the very last of the twenty some “boys” that made the ultimate sacrifice during that war in either the European or Pacific theater.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms
Amidst a river of tears I kissed my wife goodbye at the airport Tuesday as she flew off for the best medical care available. I’ll pull no punches here: I’m less than half a man without her. She’s that awesome.

I never believed in soul mates before I met her. I figured that was just something one lover said to another to make them feel bad when they didn’t get what they wanted, but I was wrong. Without waxing too poetic let me say that she’s the star in my sky, the very song in my heart.


Gower Letter to the Editor
Dear Norma,
I wanted to let you know how much I appreciate your coverage of the East Buchanan football games. It means a lot to the kids, their parents, the community and our staff.
Thanks!
Coach Bryan
Coach, I consider it a privilege to help celebrate the successes of the Blue & Gold Dawgs, having a son and daughter that were once Bulldogs, many years ago.. I still bleed Blue & Gold!! Thank you! Go Dawgs! NW


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Today started out cool and crisp, but has turned nice and sunny. Who would believe that Christmas is just around the corner?
Speaking of Christmas, be sure to check out page 8 of this issue - it is a special Christmas page, and features an article by Edith.
Edith was taken to the the hospital sometime last night; please add her to your prayer list, as well as Vickie Eads, Allen Pendleton, our service men & women and those who have lost loved ones.
Please forgive any errors, omissions or misspellings in the Bits this week - I am having to type them up from Edith’s hastily-scrawled first draft.


Post Scripts
Most people have spent all of November being thankful. Daily posts on Facebook. Counting the ways we are thankful. Or at least sending wonderful texts and messages on Thanksgiving morning to let family and friends know that they were thought of and appreciated.

I would like to say that each day I find something to be thankful for. And for the most part, that is probably a true statement. But to stop and deliberately recognize the things you may take for granted or thoroughly under-appreciate... that is reason to pause.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms
Now don’t be thinking I’m anti-hunter or anti-gun or anti-nut or anything else, but I’m looking to make a small fortune (hey, $200 is $200!) off deer season because I, being the faux farmer or counterfeit country that I am, have had a brilliant idea. I’ll tan the deer hides these guys throw away and make dog treats out of them. Pretty sweet, eh?

No, of course not. You’re more likely to get a good weather report from the National Enquirer than to read about one of my successful ideas.


A Christmas Thought
By Edith Webb
I was reading an article the other day called The Poosey Digest. I was very impressed with it, so thought I would pass along some the ideas from the article.

With our economy in such a mess, and everything to buy is made overseas, why not keep our dollars within our own county or small community.

Imagine if we only buy U.S. made gifts or homemade gifts. What a boost that would bring.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Wet and 43 degrees. We need that rain, but no ice, sleet or snow! Wouldn’t it be something if we could just order what we wanted? What a mixed up mess we would have. I, for one, am satisfied to leave the planning to greater authority.
I will have a lot of news next week, as promised when I made my calls last night, so get ready to enjoy and catch up on all the “Who done what, when and where”!
Let us continue to pray for the leaders of our country. They sure need a lot of wisdom, and we know where they can get that.


Letter to the Editor
Dear Editor,
I’m writing this in response to the community meeting last Monday night that was held to discuss the four day school week. I am one of the three new board members that was elected in April. I thought the discussion was a step in the right direction for future communication. However, I was a little concerned with the comments that only 25% of voters voted and that the low turnout was the reason for the three to be elected. The numbers are: 2009 - 15.5% - 499 voters; 2010 - 16% - 517 voters and 2011 - 24% - 762 voters.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms
But first…the farm report. We’ve lost another chicken, the last of the 6 off-season chicks from the farm supply store. Don’t know what happened there, I just woke up one morning and Clinton County’s finest were stringing yellow “crime scene” tape and there was a chicken-shaped chalk line on my front porch. Initial reports suggest a possible Spontaneous Chicken Combustion, but I’m happy those are the extent of my losses.

We’ve also added two goats, prompting a comment from a good friend (who’s helping me accumulate vast supplies of firewood to warm my city-thin carcass!) that is worth quoting in full.

“Well, I’ll be.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Beautiful weather we are having, and I hear it will last all week.
Thanksgiving is almost here - are you making a list of what you are thankful for this year?
I know it is hard for some of us. As you know, this year has really been stressful for me. Seems like everything happened, but you know, I still have so much to be thankful for.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms
(the picture is of my mom on the dusty streets of Amarillo, probably sometime near the end of WWII)
For once I’m at a loss for words. One seldom sees a more perfect match to my father, not fire and ice–more like fire and fire– yet her gentleness, compassion were beyond compare. Loyal wife, mother of five, with grandchildren, great-grandchildren; but all cut short on an icy road in 2003. She was dark haired and green eyed, could slap harder than any woman I ever knew, and her favorite song was “Me and My Bobby McGee” sung by Janis Joplin.

And what a woman!


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
We finally got some much-needed rain, even if it is cold and wet.
Halloween is over, and Thanksgiving and Christmas are real close. So let us remember what we are thankful for, and that Jesus is the reason for the season.
I, for one, believe we are bringing in the birth pains of the latter days that the Bible tells us about. With all the disasters taking place one right after another, and with God and prayer taken out of our schools, public places and even our homes, what else can it be?


Post Scripts
A CSIP Plan of my own

“Comprehensive Improvement Plan” of some sort... Whatever you want to call it, I’ve had a little heart to heart with myself these past couple of months. I’ve been around the world and back, so to speak, and picked up some pretty invaluable lessons along the way.

Mostly, I guess, is that if God opens a door that won’t close, and closes a door that won’t open...you’d better pay attention. And if you beat your head against a wall long enough, you eventually learn that opening a door is a whole lot less painful.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms
My Father Fathoms Faux Farms

But first…the livestock report! Here goes: animals make a lot of poo. No one tells me these things.

All the grass has been eaten and I feel the need to take the lawn mower and mulch manure over every inch of the landscape. And Gus the Farm Dog has a girlfriend. Her name’s Minnie and she’s also a Great Pyrenees and 8 weeks old, which means she’s seriously cute, ready to kill but can hardly walk straight.


Be Our Guest
Editor’s Note: On Monday, November 7, 2011, the government filed its final say on the Brooke Gray matter. The following response is from Gray’s attorney, Dave Roland from the Freedom Center of Missouri, to Rural Reporter’s Assistant Editor, Spencer Warren.

The first dangerous argument is that the government doesn’t really have to prove anything. The question in this case has never been whether Brooke Gray floats horses’ teeth - the question is whether she does so unlawfully. We pointed out that the law does not prevent Brooke from floating teeth if she doesn’t get paid for doing so and that the Board cannot even prevent her from getting paid for work performed outside the state of Missouri; we demanded that the government produce one credible witness who personally observed Brooke providing paid services in this state. The AG’s office basically resorted to the “everybody knows this is what she does” argument, stating that “it is not necessary that each witness corroborate each point.” But it is necessary! Here’s an analogy: Imagine that the government sends you a ticket for speeding, but all the ticket says is that the highway patrol believes you were driving 66 mph. It doesn’t specify the date or time, and it doesn’t even say what the speed limit was. At trial, the government produces a card that says “Spencer Warren - I Can’t Drive 55,” and witnesses who say “Spencer frequently talks about driving fast,” or “I once saw Spencer drive past my house going fast,” or “I was in the car with Spencer when he was driving 66 mph, but I didn’t know the speed limit and we may have been in Kansas,” or “I saw a car going 66 mph when the speed limit was 55 mph; I don’t know Spencer, but someone told me it was his car.” You show evidence that the speed limit is 70 mph on some Missouri highways, so driving 66 mph on those roads would not be illegal. You don’t dispute that you sometimes drive that fast, but you demand that the government prove one instance in which someone saw your car breaking the speed limit in Missouri when you were behind the wheel. The government cannot prevail by saying, “Hey look, everyone knows that Spencer breaks the speed limit. We don’t really need to prove a specific instance of it happening.” Unfortunately, that’s exactly what the government is arguing in Brooke’s case.


The second dangerous argument is that the Court should punish Brooke for refusing to provide evidence that could be used against her in a criminal prosecution. Essentially, it argued that Brooke’s exercise of her Fifth Amendment right to silence prevented the government from making its case and that the Court should just assume that she is guilty. Doing its best imitation of George Orwell, the AG’s Office argued: “This is not ‘punishing’ [the] Defendant; it is confronting her with the consequences of her choice not to comply in any way with discovery.” Seriously, it’s the last sentence on page 10. The Fifth Amendment exists precisely to prevent the government from “confronting [citizens] with the consequences” of refusing to answer potentially incriminating questions, and it is extremely unsettling that the Missouri Attorney General’s office - whose primary responsibility is to uphold the U.S. and Missouri Constitutions - is so blatantly trying to define away our constitutional protections.


The third dangerous argument is that Missouri citizens have no right to earn a living that the General Assembly is bound to respect. The AG’s Office states on page 13 that the constitutional right to earn a living - which both state and federal courts have acknowledged for more than a century - “would not be a defense to the allegations of the Petition even if proven.” If adopted by the Court, this position would mean that the government could prevent citizens from engaging in any occupation, no matter how common or harmless it might be, even if those citizens are demonstrably more skilled than those favored by the government! On page 20 the AG’s Office highlighted three scenarios in which an unlicensed person might be more knowledgeable and competent than a licensed professional, but insisted that the government must have the power to prevent these knowledgeable, competent people from earning a living applying their skills and expertise.


The fact that the Missouri Attorney General’s Office would make these arguments is a perfect illustration of why the Freedom Center is in this fight. Americans established constitutional rights to protect themselves from government intrusion into their lives - but those rights are only useful if courts are willing to enforce them. Our job is to do everything we can to teach judges (and citizens!) about these vital constitutional principles and, hopefully, to persuade them that individual liberty really is the bedrock on which our society depends. Brooke’s position throughout this case has been that animal owners are in a better position than any legislator or bureaucrat to decide what is best for themselves and their animals. We really don’t think that is a controversial position. The government clearly has a legitimate interest in preventing fraud, in which one citizen lies about their qualifications or abilities, but the government cannot constitutionally prevent citizens from truthfully representing their abilities and it cannot prevent Missouri’s animal owners from choosing to pay trusted, skilled workers to help them with their animals. We have done our best to show this to the judge in Brooke’s case; we hope that he agrees.
Dave Roland
Director of Litigation
Freedom Center of Missouri


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Beautiful day, but going to turn rainy and cold tomorrow, or so they say. But I did get to go for a ride through the countryside, and enjoyed all the beautiful fall colors and much more, as son John took me back to the farm. We lived there 56 years ago, and I hadn’t been back since we left in 1962. Boy was a ever surprised! I didn’t know where we were until he told me, as the countryside had all grown up with housing additions, etc. The one room schoolhouse still stands, empty and forlorn, but standing. The church has been made bigger, and is still holding services for the growing community that has taken some of the old farms.


Post Scripts
Putting resources in the hands of the people…
“One good thing about being stubborn is that you always know what you’re going to be thinking the next day.”-Overheard in a satirical political interview

There are times when we need to pull ourselves up. There are times when we need to reach out for help. There are times when one more gift or charity will enable; but you can never forget that one more gift or kindness could save a life.


Faux Farms
Not too much to report on the farm this week, except that my better ¾’s found a great home for a stray we took in, none other than Mollie the Chicken Killer, and we wish her well in her new home. Our decimated fowl population continues to survive, including our donated rooster whom we’ve named Robanks Hamilton in honor of the donor and the famous Ro-Ho, the only rooster to have a top 40 country song sung about him. Yes, Faux Farms is a strange place.

But aside from the fun-filled five o’clock feeding time where the llamas spit at each other and make sounds like creatures from Star Wars and the sheep and I “baa” at each other, there are only two good (if brief) stories to share.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Just a short column this week. I didn’t get to make many calls - I’ve been staying home this past week because of foot surgery. While I was trying to stay off my feet, I broke my “china choppers”. Wow! What an added expense, but praise God - He will supply my needs according to His riches in Glory by Christ Jesus. Philippians 4:19
Let us continue to pray diligently for our country, service men and women and Israel; and at home - Vickie Eads, Cheriee Dawson, Millie Green, Betty Cutting and each other.


Letter to the Editor
Parent voices should be heard

Dear Pauli,
I wanted to express a sincere thanks to board member Jay Maddick for advocating for the voices of Lathrop parents and citizens. What can be more basic and rudimentary for citizens’ rights than free speech, especially when the public entity belongs to the taxpayers? And yet this most elementary strand of patron representation has been neglected by Lathrop school boards for years.

Virginia Barrett stated that “We are not lawyers.” Then why act like them?


Post Scripts
Three columns in a row does not loyalty make, but thanks for reading. :)

There has been this lurching undertone of gloom with our country’s economic condition. You’ve felt it. We’ve all felt it and either look to find which villains to blame, or who our heroes are going to be to bring us relief from this desperate situation.

One side of the party lines will put the spotlight on big government, the other on corporate greed and Wall Street.


Be Our Guest
Horse Owners May Lose the Right to Choose
Submitted by Tom Allen, DVM, IAED Certified
www.horsedentist.com


Editor’s Note - This is a 2-part series with pictures explaining Dr. Allen’s position in upholding Brooke Gray vs. the MVMB, the trial held in the Clinton County Courthouse in Plattsburg, Missouri, in which she was accused of “practicing veterinary medicine without a license” by the Missouri Veterinary Medical Board. 1st part published in the October 13th editon of the Rural Reporter.


Faux Farms
There’s all kinds of exciting stuff going on, but first the livestock report! The 3 young pullets are doing well and Matilda the Evil Chicken abruptly stopped her maniacal cluck-laughter and has resumed her regular chicken talk. This may have something to do with the fact that she hopped the wrong fence and found herself (once again) surrounded by growling canines dreaming of KFC, delivered right to their doggie doorstep.

But in swoops Gus the Wonder Dog, our Great Pyrenees who knew his job from birth and knows more about farm life than I ever will.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Winter is on its way. The squirrels are in a frenzy, running to and fro gathering and storing food supplies and all the animals are getting a heavier coat. Now that tells me something - I had better get a move on and start preparing better, as winter is coming early this year. Don’t believe me? Just watch the animals. God protects even the animals, as they listen to Him and start preparing. What an awesome God we serve.
Let us continue to pray for our economy and the leaders of our country; service men and women and Israel.


Letter to the Editor
Dear Editor,
I have been associated with many veterinarians over a forty-year period. I have met vets with great knowledge, skills and rapport with both people and animals. Many vets are more knowledgeable in certain areas and often practice more in that area of expertise. Some tend to wounds and stitch hides together better than a seamstress. Others diagnosis lameness and administer treatments to save life and limb. Others are more versed in fertility and insemination procedures. They are secure in their knowledge and skills.


Post Scripts
“While the right to talk may be the beginning of freedom, the necessity of listening is what makes the right important”
Walter Lippmann quotes (American Journalist, 1889-1974)

I think I got ahead of myself last week. Thinking was the theme of my pontification that you so graciously endured.


Faux Farms
Experiencing the strange ritual known as “harvest time” I can only say that the mornings are chill, sometimes there’s fog thick as pea soup, the big country dark scares me and I wanna go home. How’s that for a cidiot psych profile?

I can’t say it often enough: it’s tough out here. Everyone has three jobs (the hardest being that of homemaker) and everyone works day and night. I just wasn’t cut out for this, it’s too hard, and I’ve sought out professional psychological help and counseling.


Be Our Guest
Horse Owners May Lose the Right to Choose
Submitted by Tom Allen, DVM, IAED Certified
www.horsedentist.com
Editor’s Note - This is a 2-part series with pictures explaining Dr. Allen’s position, which will be published next week in the Rural Reporter.

Who Helps Their Horses
In November of 2011, the judge is expected to present his decision in Brooke Gray’s case, from the trial in the Clinton County Courthouse in Plattsburg, Missouri, in which she was accused of “practicing veterinary medicine without a license” by the Missouri Veterinary Medical Board. If the decision is in favor of the veterinary board (MVMB), then only licensed veterinarians will be legally allowed to float horses’ teeth in the state.


Bits About 'Em
Good (foggy!) morning,
Spring and fall are my favorite seasons of the year. Fall, with the beautiful trees changing colors; and spring with all the pretty green and flowers. My, what a great God we have to create such beauty for us to enjoy.
Every spring, Howard and I would take a ride through the countryside and just enjoy. Oh, how I miss that ride this year. I can’t drive and look around at the same time, but I can still remember all the fall-spring drives and praise God for the 44 years of sightseeing with Howard.


Letters to the Editor
Customers of Brooke Gray express admiration, respect

Dear Editor,
I am writing to express my support and admiration for Brook Gray during a very difficult time. Her strength and determination have been an inspiration to me. When others would have given up...she has done so much to try to improve the situation!!!

I have had the opportunity to observe Ms. Gray after the STRONG recommendation of one of my equine vets. Ms Gray “floated” the teeth of my 5 horses.


Post Scripts
Can we just have a THINK movement???

Note to self: Turn OFF the cable news channels before I go to sleep.

I mentioned a couple of weeks ago about the clash of my two worlds. The idealistic hippie, and the world of free enterprise are both in the blood that flows through my veins. Look around today, my friends... the world is mirroring this very dichotomy.

Occupy Wall Street was coined early on as the “Tea Party for the Left”... I listened with one ear... sort of what I did with the Tea Party movement two years ago.


Faux Farms
I’ve been informed in no uncertain terms that I’m a stranger in town, and that it takes about 10 years to attain the rank of neighbor, and that only my children would be natives. Well…only 9.75 years to go! Meanwhile, here’s Faux Farms quarterly report: abysmal failure! And you guys make it look so stinking easy.

First of all, I’m pretty much the Joseph Stalin of the chicken world, having not only turned my entire flock into dog food but even the little ones weren’t spared. You may recall our little miracle here at the farm, that I was left with a cache of fertilized eggs and a terrific birthday present in the way of an incubator with an egg-turner in it.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Another glorious day - praise God from whom all blessings flow.
Not much news this week - I guess folks are outside taking advantabe of this weather in preparation for winter.
My daughter, Norma, had a very safe and great trip to Canada. She returned Monday morning; I sure was glad to see her. Haven’t had a chance to talk to her yet, but know she will give us the news of her trip as soonas she can.
Let us continue to pray for our country, government, service men & women and Israel; also for Vickie Eads, Cheryl Carpenter and each other.
God bless,
Edith


Letters to the Editor
In defense of Brooke...

To the Editor:
Have you committed any crimes lately? If you own or interact with animals, the unfortunate answer is that you probably can’t be sure!
Current Missouri law makes it a criminal offense for any non-veterinarian to change the physical or mental condition of any animal they do not own, unless they are a full-time employee of the animal’s owner. During the recent trial for Missouri Veterinary Medical Board v. Brooke Gray, Dana Fennewald, the Veterinary Medical Board’s Executive Director, made clear that the Board considers itself to have near-absolute discretion when it comes to deciding what Missouri’s veterinary laws mean and to whom they will be applied.


Faux Farms
First, a warm-hearted thank you must go out to Jessica Howard of family-owned Hamilton Bank in Lathrop for her generous donation of a rooster to augment our decimated flock. For a quasi-urbanite schmuck like myself, it was quite an experience to drive into town and have my banker hand me a perforated cardboard box with a young red rooster in it. Call me a cidiot but I’ve just never withdrawn a chicken from an account before.

As some readers know, we have on our farm the Lone Chicken of the Apocalypse who wanders the yard, blithely disregarding the chilling facts that she is the last of her kind and her home is basically a mass murder scene.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Nice brisk morning; will be about 70 to 75 degrees by afternoon. I am still preparing for an early winter by getting a new storm door, storm window and a lot of other little things. Also bought one of those little infrared heaters. Does it use much electricity? Good question - I’ll let you know!
Now, for the important part of my column - our prayer lists.


Letter to the Editor
To Whom It May Concern:
It is not difficult to read between the lines and conclude that Missouri Veterinary Medical Board v. Brooke Gray and B&B Equine Dentistry is simply a way for veterinarians to secure financial rights to what was once considered beneath the dignity of a licensed veterinarian.


Post Scripts
I got called a hippie the other day. Part of me was quite flattered, seeing how I’ve always felt like I was born 15 years too early.

The other part of me was saying, “Wait! I believe in capitalism and profit margins and free enterprise!”

Welcome to the clash of my two worlds. There should be one heck of a thunderstorm in my doorway, with claps of thunder and lightening from the violent collision of two fronts.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms
by S. Daily Warren
Little feathered life has returned to Faux Farms! Itty-bitty eyes looking up with infant curiosity, tiny wings showing the first signs of plumage, little legs stretching in preparation for a robust hop before our six little pullets develop their patented chicken waddle. No one ever accused me of being a chick magnet but I think these little feathered gals, almost two weeks old now, are taking a liking to me.

Our new little flock, purchased from a farm supply outlet in Kearney just after the Grim Reaper paid his gruesome visit to our peaceful acres, are making themselves quite at home.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Another beautiful day; fall and spring are my favorite seasons. You can have summer and winter - too hot and too cold for me. Guess I am getting particular in my old age.
While we are enjoying this beautiful weather, let us continue to pray for our country, service men & women and Israel.
At home, continue to pray for Vickie Eads and each other.
God bless,
Edith


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms
by MRS. Warren!
(the self-aggrandizing hack known as “S. Daily Warren” will not be joining us this week. He has been suspended and is currently on probation until properly chastised by higher authority. Mainly me, his wife. If he’s a good boy he can come back next week.)

First of all let’s get one of these libelous accusations from last week straightened out, pronto. I did NOT lie about Izzy Kitty or stage in any way this helpless kitten’s entrance into Faux Farms.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Nice cool morning - fall is here for sure, with cold winter weather right behind it. We need to get prepared. Folks are already talking Christmas - me, I am just going to coast through, especially if it is as cold as I think it will be. I will just hibernate until spring - ha, ha, fat chance of that.
In the meantime, let’s continue to pray for our country and for Godly wisdom for each and everyone that is in authority; our service men and women and those who are less fortunate than we are.


Faux Farms
Well, it happened....the angel of death has visited Faux Farms and walked away with the souls of all but one of my chickens! It was terrible, a bloodbath, a menagerie of murder. One minute they’re clucking happily away and in the next moment a horde of EMT’s, firemen and cops descend upon Faux Farms, along with several members of the FBI and Homeland Security who were on site as advisors. Their official report? They said I was a bad farmer, something I already knew.

But aside from my gross exaggerations I am heart-broken at the loss of my chickens.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Rather nippy this morning - I can feel the cold creeping into these old bones now, as I write. If it doesn’t get any colder, that would be great, but of course, we know it will, so start getting ready now. I feel we are in for an early and cold winter.
Let us start praying for the healing of our land, wisdom for the leaders of our country, jobs, protection for our service men and women; also for those who are less fortunate than we are. God does hear and answer prayers. As for our home folks: Vickie Eads, Faye Ganley, Millie Green, David La Pee and Colton and Robbie Marks.
God bless,
Edith
****


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms
A man has to know when he’s beat, to know when to throw in the towel. In fact it’s one of the definitions of insanity to keep doing the exact same thing while expecting a different result, and that’s where I’ve been this last week.

Beaten. I was so sure it was all over. A city boy can’t make it in the country, especially when said boy is middle-aged and foolish. Perhaps I never even had a chance.  


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Nice cool morning - fall is surely on its way. We will be beginning a new year before we know it. In the meantime, let’s continue to pray for our country, President, service men and women, Israel and of course, each other.
Our prayer list close to home: Vickie Eads, Faye Ganley, Dorothy Slayton, David Jones, David La Pee, Paul Boyd.


Faux Farms
Last week we discussed the only other creature I know of who is more out of their element than myself- our boxer dog Albert. He came with us up from the city, so he’s a Cidiot himself. Albert is the great-grandson of my boyhood dog but in no other way does he qualify as a canine. In fact, my better 3/4’s and I refer to Albert as our “fuzzy child” or one of the “jingly people” from the sound of his collar as he frolics.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Beautiful morning! As I was going to Travel Express this morning at 6:45, the sun was just peeking over the hill. What a colorful and beautiful sight - I didn’t have the words to describe such beauty, but as I watched, I couldn’t help but remember how awesome and good our God is. He created so much for us to enjoy - the birds of all colors, the colors of fall and spring, the stars at night and on and on. As I remembered all these things, I just started praising God so much for letting us enjoy His marvelous works. What a wonderful way to start my day.
On our prayer list this week:


Letters to the Editor
Norma,
I just wanted to take a minute to say thank you (The Rural Reporter, emailed upon request, the article and memoriam of her late step-father, Alan Boydston). Mom told me a reporter spoke to her, I thought it might have been someone from the Rural Reporter.
The memoriam was nicely written.
The article was well written but hard to read yet...I had to put it down for awhile when I read it was reported Alan was mumbling when Mr Neely arrived...I so want to believe he didn’t suffer...life is so cruel sometimes.


Fee, Fi, Faux Farms
I have the count: 5 dead, 1 missing, 0 wounded (thankfully)

We’ve decided to tough it out, for one winter at least, although I’m thinking of renaming this column “Warren Peace” because Lathrop is like my wife: beautiful but tough.

Three chickens, two cats and one missing emperor penguin comprise the current casualty list. I must admit I did not know how it would be here, or how sturdy the people.


From London to Lathrop - A Flash Mob Future?
Greetings to you from across the cold, stormy waters of the North Atlantic. I have been invited to write an Englishman’s perspective of the recent rioting in London and other British cities. I share the opinion of most reasonable folk in this country who were shocked and outraged at the sudden ferocity of the recent events which led to large scale destruction of property, services and loss of life.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Another beautiful day the Lord has made, let us rejoice and be glad in it.
This is my kind of weather. I dread the cold, snow and ice this winter, so I’m getting my long Johns ready this week. Something tells me I might need them a little earlier this year. I’m also getting ready for some new storm doors and windows.
With school starting this week, let’s keep our kids, teachers and bus drivers in prayer; also our President, Israel, service folks and the disaster victims.


New Jail? Yes! No! I Don’t Know! Can I Change My Answer?
an Op-Ed by S. Daily Warren
Webster’s Dictionary defines “jail” as follows: ”An icky place where good things happen to bad people, surrounded by beefy guys with guns and little to no sense of humor.” (also see: The Marquis de Sade’s Living Room or The Luxurious Accommodations of A Well-Behaved Husband)

But the real question is, does Clinton County need one? Yes, but we already have one.

Okay, then no (here’s where it gets icky).


Faux Farms Final, Part Deux!
by S. Daily Warren
This just isn’t working out.

The cat eats the dog food, the dog eats the chicken eggs and the chickens are ordering take-out. Alpacalama-food is expensive so the half dozen sheep I just paid an arm and a hoof for now prefer that cuisine while the llamas are throwing a fuss by staging an all-red-clover food strike. As Charlton Heston said, “It’s a madhouse!”

All the “smart” folks back in KC who tune the parking meters and sanitize the telephones said this would be a lot easier than it is.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Nice cool weather this morning - a nice break for us, also some promise of rain.
Again, I don’t have much news - no one has been home. Everyone must be getting ready for school, which starts next week for some; or are just enjoying the cooler weather.
Let’s not forget to pray for our country, our President, disaster victims and our military folks. Our special prayer list this week includes Vickie Eads, David Jones, Faye Ganley, Dan Gisebert’s one week old grandson, Preston Singleton, and of course each other.


Faux Farms.......
By S. Daily Warren
When asked how my wife and I ended up in Lathrop I have two answers: we left KC because of KC and the llamas did it. Not a one “l” lama which is from Tibet but the two “l” llama which is from South America (a three “l” lama is one heck of a fire).

In short, my wife wanted alpacas and is fuming right now as she reads this that I still call them llamas. I explained to her the silliness of the idea, that you couldn’t eat them and they’re no good for milk and useless as pack animals.


Post Scripts
Would school start... Please??!!

August in 2011 means something a bit different than it did in 2001.

Ten years ago, children were 9, 10, and 13. As long as we kept the tires up on the bicycles and had the coolest book bag WalMart sold, we were good!


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Still hot - matter of fact, it’s supposed to be the hottest day of the year so far. I know my air conditioner is running full force, while I am moving rather slow. If this heat doesn’t let up soon, we will all be cooked.
Folks, let’s all join together and pray without ceasing for Vickie Eads, as she waits for a heart transplant, which must be soon. Also pray for the weather, our President, service folks and disaster victims. Also add Faye Ganley to our prayer list.
God bless and stay cool,
Edith
****


Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor:
My wife and I happily landed in Lathrop a couple of months ago and all I can say is.....heaven help us! We’re just 2 simple Cidiots (city idiots) who thought country living was coffee at sunrise on the front porch. No one said anything about the work!

Everything is work here, backbreaking work. It takes heavy machinery to mow the lawn and the time spent fixing one broken thing on the farm, daily, is merely an interval allowing three new things to break down.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Still hot, and our economy, world affairs, politicians and etc. are all in bad shape. In general, our country and the world are going downhill, but one thing is for sure. God is still in control, and by keeping our eyes on Him, we will survive. So, we need to visit with our Lord every day and give Him control over our lives.
Our prayers this week at home are for Vickie Eads, Gerald Mick, Dorothy Slayton, Gene Schoonover, David La Pee and David Jones.


Letter to the Editor
Dear Editor,
I am writing this letter to communicate to parents, teachers and community the action that I took as a school board member as it pertains to the 2011/2012 school budget and to inform the community on financial matters and concerns facing the school district as I see them. I am not speaking for the board or anyone else on the board. I would like to also share with you some of the things coming up in the next several years that influenced my decision.

I will first address the issue with the teachers’ raises.


Post Scripts
You and me baby,
we’re stuck like glue!

Don’t you just LOVE that song?? Okay, well, if you’re not a Sugarland fan, you can skip the cutesy play on words, and I’ll just get down to business! :)

I am so excited to see the efforts put forth by the wonderful volunteers of the Chamber folks, and the interest displayed in being a GOOD organization that really loves our community and its people.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Wowee - Hot! Hot! If you like hot weather, you’ve got it. If not, just join the crowd around the A/C, swimming hole, shade tree or where ever. Don’t push or shove, just go - I’m heading that way!
Folks, we sure need to keep those prayers going for our President, our country, Israel, service men and women and our disaster victims. And remember, God will supply all our needs according to His riches in glory in Christ Jesus - Philippians 4:19.


Post Scripts
It’s FESTIVAL TIME!

Wow! Has it actually been 47 years? Not to say that I have been around to see them all, but I can say that I have officially been to almost half of them!

We moved here in 1988, and spent the first Festival as Lathropians when Nick was a newborn!


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
A nice warm one, but a hotter day ahead. Seems like we are in for some hot weather for a while. We sure don’t need rain around here - it just needs to dry up some.
Let us continue to pray for our disaster victims, our country, Israel and service men and women. Also, pray that the hearts and minds of men and women everywhere be responsive to the Gospel of Jesus Christ.
Our prayers are needed for Vickie Eads, David Jones, Brenda Townsend, Betty Cooper and David Lapee.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Beautiful morning - will be a little warmer today.
Well, the 4th is over, and now we are looking forward to Labor Day. Then cold and snow. Time sure moves fast these days. Must be the radio, TV, cell phones and all the modern doodads. Whatever the reason, I know it is time to stay prayed up and keep our focus on God, because I do believe our time is short here on earth as we know it.
Let us pray for our President, Israel, service men & women; and closer to home: Vicki Eads, Barbara Monks, David Jones and each other.


Post Scripts
By Pauli Clariday
I wanted to write this column last week, when my dander was up. But the subject is still heavy on my heart and on my mind.

I admit I have been guilty of doing little more than sympathizing with the victims of home burglaries over the past few years. I have seen that they have increased....I have seen that officials seem to point toward unknown thugs that find their way, somehow, to our back roads and seemingly find unoccupied houses to break in and rob.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Beautiful morning, isn’t it?
I sure hope you can forgive me and also understand - I had a big senior moment last night, and forgot to call for news. I hear this happens when one gets to be a senior, but I hope it doesn’t get to be a habit!
Let us continue to pray for our country; especially for our government and Israel, and our service men and women. On our prayer list this week is Vickie Eads, David Jones, Barbara Monks and each other.
God bless,
Edith


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Another beautiful morning, with the temperature a little lower, in the 80’s. Still, there is a lot of flooding.
Folks, we need to pray for God to heal our land, as we are sure having a lot of problems. Man just doesn’t have the answer to the kind of things that are happening. Prayers are needed this week for our country, Israel, each other and of course our service men and women. Also for Vickie Eads and David Jones.
God bless,
Edith
Keep smiling - God loves you!


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Nice cool morning - supposed to get hot today, around 85 degrees. That’s not too bad.
Not much to write about this week. I keep real busy doing this and that - I find that keeping busy and prayed up is the way to go.
Let us continue to pray for all the disaster victims, our country, Israel and each other. Also for Vickie Eads, David Jones, Vera Schoonover and Gene Ward.
God bless,
Edith


Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor,
The outcome of CPWSD #4’s proposed $12 million bond issue went over like a tsetse in a punch bowl.  After spending tens of thousands of dollars, the Board of Directors has displayed another fine example of “Authority with no Responsibility”.
The Board’s President recently stated to the public that he “is not concerned” with the failure.  This is a true lack of leadership.
Not too impressive after spending serious sums of public funds, chasing $12 million of public funds. 


BIts About 'Em
Good morning,
Rather hot today, but that is better than 6 feet of snow!
Friends and neighbors, once again, I want to express my thanks and gratitude for your prayers, hugs, flowers, food and cards during my most difficult time.
Your acts of kindness meant more to me than I can possibly say, except may God bless each and every one of you in a special way.
We need to continue to pray for our country, service men and women, Israel and all the storm victims. As many of you know, prayer is the best weapon we have against all manner of warfare.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Well, folks, I think it’s safe to say that summer has arrived! At least for the next week or so - you really never know here in Missouri, do you?
Edith is still out of the office - please continue to pray for her as she adjusts to her new lifestyle.


Be Our Guest
The following memo was shared with us by the PWSD#4 office.
I thought Thursday’s meeting was very informative. After hearing from both sides the Citizens Oversight Committee of Clinton County and the district board, it appears that we need to authorize the bonds. I believe it to be in the best interest of all the CPWSD #4 customers.


Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor,
Customers of the CPWSD #4 should know the facts before voting on Tuesday, June 7th, 2011. The “Informational” Town Hall Meeting, that took place on Thursday, May 26th, 2011 at Lathrop Middle School, was anything but informational.

The Board of Directors of CPWSD #4, was asked two specific questions, which were not specifically answered.

Question #1 - What kind of profit does the district currently make?


BIts About 'Em
Good morning,
Most of you have heard that Edith’s beloved Howard went to his Heavenly home last week. He will be greatly missed by his family and friends, but they can also rejoice that he is now with his Saviour and no longer sick or in pain.
Please keep Edith and the rest of the family in your prayers, as well as all the victims of the recent tornadoes. What a horrifying experience that must have been for those poor folks!


Letter to the Editor
Authority: opinion, decision, influence, having power, give commands....

Responsibility: moral, legal, accountability, quality, trustworthiness....

Authority and Responsibility are two essential components for success, and must be practiced in harmony.

These two traits, working in harmony, produce successful relationships for personal well being, business success, parent/child, employer/employee, etc.


Post Scripts
As I was writing my column last week, I had no idea that my entire week was going to be turned upside down. I had no idea that my Grandpa would pass away. I had no idea that the city of Joplin was going to face tragedy and destruction in the deadliest tornado in recent history.

So ironic that I was in New Orleans listening to the devastation and loss just last week. So ironic that I found myself home unexpectedly before planned so I was here when my Grandpa passed.


BIts About 'Em
Good morning,
Beautiful weather - sun shining so brightly and it is warmer. Matter of fact, just perfect for this time of year. Praise God - no storms! Let us continue to pray for the flooded states, tornado and earthquake victims and for the healing of our land.
Our President needs lots of prayer; so do the service men & women and Israel. And of course, let’s pray for each other. Also on our prayer list this week are Vickie Eads, David Jones, Gerald Green, Louise Spaeth and our own Miranda Gorham whose out of the office with a allergic reaction to asthma medication.


Letter to the Editor
Dear Editor,
Now that the scuttlebutt about the four day school week appears to have settled down, I would like to weigh in on the positive side. First of all I would like to point out that our school district recently received recognition in the form of “distinction in performance” for academic achievement by the state of Missouri. Secondly, our elementary is one of the few schools in the state that was recognized as an “exemplary Professional Learning Community”, not to mention that they are being led by the “outstanding northwest elementary principal of the year”, Mr. Chauncey Rardon.

I have a unique perspective of our district.


Post Scripts
II love traveling...seeing new places. I think I must be all grown up now, because instead of cruising gravel roads or paying my quarter to cross the Broadway Bridge for new, unexplored terrain, I have been coast to coast and to the golf, with some Midwest cities and Las Vegas along the way.

I love the window seat. I think you might as well tunnel from one destination to the other if you can’t look out the window. Humankind has certainly tattooed the earth.


BIts About 'Em
Good morning,
A real nice warm day, and will get warmer by afternoon. Let us pray that the weather will remain calm.
I understand that a lot of our Lathrop men are heading south to help with the cleanup. Timberline Trading, Crooked River Enterprises, Christopher Coots’ Plumbing, Darrell Morgan and Jeremy Hope - there are at least 40 vehicles involved.


Letters to the Editor
Lathrop, Missouri is a small town. It doesn’t have very many stores or businesses, and some people say that we need places to shop here. I want Lathrop to have more businesses because it would save people gas mileage.

My first reason that I want more stores and businesses is, it would make less of a trip than driving so many minutes away.


Post Scripts
Speak to the good....
As many of you know, I spend the other 40 hours of my week at Cameron Insurance Companies in Cameron as their Communications Specialist/Marketing Analyst. Insurance is an interesting industry, and one that’s not exempt from bad press, lack of consumer understanding, and a hodge podge of marketing messages that give silliness like Flo and Mayhem authority in a complicated industry.


Be Our Guest
The irony of having a quorum to conduct a business meeting and swearing in new Trustees, became intertwined at the Village of Turney Meeting on April 8th, Clinton County Courthouse in Plattsburg. FYI - Taking the oath during a business meeting is not required. The ceremony’s authenticity is not dependent on the location or during any part of a meeting unless stated in the entity’s bylaws. (Turney had bylaws last year, but this year they do not according to former Appointed Board Member and appointed Chair Jim Gorham.)


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Another day that the Lord hath made - let us rejoice and be glad in it.
Each day, as I listen to the news, I am glad that God is still on the throne and in charge. People have made a great big mess out of this world, and I think we should pray without ceasing and with all our hearts for our country and leaders. Also for our service men and women.


Letter to the Editor
Dear Editor,
If you would be so kind as to forward this to Miranda Gorham I would appreciate it.
Ms Gorham, I read your article on the Commissioners “town hall meeting” at Cameron, in this weeks issue of the Rural Reporter. You did a great job of writing what I said to the Commissioners. It’s once in a blue moon that I’m ever mentioned in any paper...and you got my name wrong!


BIts About 'Em
Good morning,
Wet and cool, but supposed to quit at 8:00.
Folks, we have a lot of prayer requests this week. The tornadoes, flood and earthquake victims, our country and Israel; here at home: Vickie Eads, Jim Ballard, Gerald Green, Barbara Morgan, Francis Swihart, Brenda Townsend, Ronnie Mings and Betty Marie Summers.
As the apostle Paul tells us in I Thessalonians 5:17, “Pray without ceasing”.


BIts About 'Em
Good morning,
What a dreary, cold day this is... and I hear that more is to follow. But Praise God that there are no tornadoes in the forecast.
Folks, we have really been blessed, with the up-and-down temps being the worst of our problems. We really should pray for the victims of tornadoes, earthquakes, floods and those affected by the difficulty of no jobs, high prices and so on. Our economy is really at its lowest.
I think we had better stay off the moon and stay where God put us. We would have more money and less air disturbances.


Letter to the Editor
Dear Editor,
CPWSD No. 4 water district is proposing a $12 million bond to save its customers money in the long run by building its own treatment facility rather than buying their water from Plattsburg. A $12 million dollar bond will cost the district about $10 million dollar in interest over the life of the bond. That is $10 million dollars profit for a bonding company.

By state law, the profits that Plattsburg gains from selling water to the district can only be used for the water system; it cannot be used to by police cars.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Beautiful morning with promises of a good day! I don’t know about you, but I am ready for the nice warm days of spring to stay.
After listening to the news about the economy, disasters, storms and etc., I believe it is time to join the Army of God and pray without ceasing for our country, especially the government, the economy and those that are less fortunate than we are.


Post Scripts
Lathrop Telephone Company shares insight to future of their internet service

I simply cannot... can NOT... put in to words how excited I am about the technology that our “little telephone company” is bringing to us over the next 2-3 years. In case you haven’t picked up on what this is... if you haven’t caught any of my previous articles... if you didn’t go to the Lathrop Chamber of Commerce meeting last Thursday night... I want you to imagine.


BIts About 'Em
Good morning,
A beautiful spring day. I remember this same kind of spring day a few ?? years ago, when I welcomed the arrival of my baby girl, “Norma”. Both Norma and the weather have changed over the years, but Norma still remains a joy - Happy birthday, Norma!
Let us pray diligently for our country and especially for our President; also the service men and women and Japan.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
It seems as though winter is one of those guests who just won’t leave. It could be worse, though. We could be buried under a foot of snow. Hopefully, within a week or so, it will start to feel like spring once again.
I have great news - the docs have finally figured out what ailed Edith, and have gotten her fixed up. She is currently recuperating, and should be back at her desk in the near future.


Letters to the Editor
Dear Friends:
I am a part of a recently formed group called the Parent Action Council. We formed because of our concern that all of our children receive the best education possible. In the 21st century we no longer have simple, one room schools with the teacher instructing numerous grade levels. We have set a high bar for our teachers and administrators and they try very hard to reach new levels while dealing with budgets and changing laws.


Post Scripts
A little more space this week...
But not enough to give you the blow by blow description of the Meet the Candidates and Budget Meeting last Wednesday night.

Candidate responses were very much in line with the responses we have been printing over the last month. There are nine candidates running for three seats. A lot will be said by the results of this election. The budget figures are available on the school’s website.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Spring has sprung and even though it is cloudy today, it is still nice and warm and feeling good!
I’m thinking about tomatoes again, but thinking about them is all I am going to do, as I am retiring my green thumb. I will just advise Peggy, and eat her tomatoes.
Not much news this week. Everyone is busy with this and that. But let us pray for Japan, our government, service men and women and each other. Our prayer list this week includes Gerald Green, Jim Ballard and Vickie Eads.
God bless, and remember God loves us.
Edith
****
Sunday was a wonderful and surprising day for Dick Lanning.


Letters to the Editor
Only my opinion:
It was recently reported that test scores in our high school have improved dramatically under the leadership of Stan Elliott as high school principal. Approximately 125 parents, grandparents and citizens signed a public petition to show their support in favor of retaining Mr. Elliott.

I have heard that notice was posted on our Lathrop Schools web site that our district was taking applications for a new varsity basketball coach two weeks before Coach Butler’s contract was to be discussed on the agenda. Approximately 130 signatures were signed on a public petition to show support for Coach Butler.

I was told by a board member that they had forgotten to renew the written lease for farmland owned by the district this past year.


Post Scripts
Maybe if I am left with less and less space, I have to be more and more succinct?
How’s this...
I have never claimed to be the world’s wisest or greatest parent. I know along the way, I’ve missed teaching some lessons here or there... and I just hope I catch the fallout along the way.
But if I remember right... I tried to teach my kids that they were never necessarily 100% right...nor were they 100% wrong.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Edith is still struggling with health issues, so bear with us until she is back on her feet! In the meantime, feel free to call or email us with your news, or write it up and bring it by.
I think spring is finally at the door; of course we could still get another snow or two before it’s all said and done.


Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor,
I do not get the opportunity or pleasure to read your paper on a regular basis; however I do get a quick synopsis off the on-line version. I was reading one story you published, entitled “Lathrop R-II staff cuts announced”, dated March 11. The year may have been 2010 - its not clear on the web. This article stated that the Lathrop R-II Schools reported a $149,000 shortfall in funds for the years 2008-2010. It also says that the school expects a shortfall of $248,000 for the 2010-2011 school year. In another article, dated February 18, the superintendent projected a reduction of $70,000 from the state.

All of this is taxpayer money being lost.


Post Scripts
Too many thoughts and not enough room!

What has happened to us? Where is our unity? Where is our peace? There is so much tension in the air, you can cut it with a knife!

In 15 years, I don’t think I’ve experienced a time in this community where there has been so much division... so much controversy. So much friction!

We have lost our sense of community and our sense of respect for our differences.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
What a gloomy day today - cold and rainy. Hopefully the sun will come out soon, and when it does, we will all appreciate it more!
Don’t forget to pray for all those who are under the weather - Vickie Eads, Mike Dickerson, David Foster, Richard Williams, Elaine Elliott and Edith Webb, to name a few. Also remember to lift up our service men and women and their families, our President, and other leaders in your daily prayers.
Remember, even if it’s gloomy and rainy out, if we know the Lord Jesus, we always have a glorious bit of sunshine in our hearts!


Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor,
In regard to the 4-day school week, consider America’s budget crisis. Would our police department cut days they patrol the town, or would they cut manpower? Would churches cut staff members or cut one week of church a month? Would our military cut down on training soldiers or cut staff? Sound educational institutions may cut a few positions, but they should not even think about cutting school days for budgeting.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Sunshine today - I guess you know that if March comes in like a lamb, she will go out like a lion. So look out for April!
Our prayer list this week: Vickie Eads, Mike Dickerson, David Foster, Richard Williams, Elaine Elliott and each other. Also our country and service folks.
Have a good week and God bless. Smile, remember God loves you!
Edith
****


Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor,
The Bible instructs us to “be angry but sin not”. I personally spoke to over 500 Lathrop residents who have some level of anger about our school district. The main complaint is that parents are not being heard. This was verified when the 4-day was passed in a town that was overwhelmingly against it, with door-to-door findings: 7% for the 4-day; 67% against it; and 26% undecided or didn’t care.

Since no other budget options were ever brought to parents, many residents suspect that Lathrop was handpicked to be a “Missouri test site” for the 4-day. Nine months later, the school board again voted for the same one-dimensional budget plan. We must be the only 4-day school in the country where no cost-cutting alternatives were given to parents in an entire year’s time. This roughly translates to 381 days of lost productive learning in a Lathrop student’s career.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
I listened to weather news this morning, and I didn’t get much out of it - just pick and choose. I do hope that March comes in like a lion - then it will go out like a lamb, and we will start spring off like the good old days.
Our prayer list this week: Vicki Eads, Elaine Elliott, Carrol Clingan, David Foster. Also our country and service folks.
God bless,
Edith
Remember to give someone a smile today!
****


Letter to the Editor
Dear Editor,
Enclosed is my check for another year’s subscription to the Rural Reporter. Your newspaper is my only connection to the Lathrop Community in which I lived more than 50 years ago.
Also enclosed is an article entitled, “Eulogy of the Dog”. I found this article on the internet, and thought it might be of interest to your canine-loving subscribers.


Be Our Guest
By Thomas A. Briscoe
Lathrop band has practice on Mondays, an off day. Why? Because learning and performance requires consistency. Lathrop coaches practice their athletes on off days, some even on Sundays! Why? Because learning and performance requires consistency. Without consistency, every coach and teacher knows, there is no success. So why, at Lathrop, does band and sports operate under these important principles for learning, yet education does not? Has academics taken a backseat to other endeavors? Or have our kids been thrown into an agenda that’s really for the adults and not for their success at all?


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Sure is nice weather we are having for a while. I hope the big snow and extreme cold are over with, don’t you?
Not much news again this week.
I do want to say “Thank you” to all my friends, neighbors and David Eads and his group for their help and prayers, gifts, visits and cards. I am still on the puny list, but improving every day. I plan to be back to work next week.
In the meantime, let us continue to pray for our country, service folks, Israel and each other.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Extremely cold out today, but so far the sun is shining. I really hope we don’t get any more snow - I guess there is around a 30% chance that we will.
Once again, our beloved Edith is in Liberty Hospital; she is recovering and gaining strength, but I know she would appreciate prayers on her behalf.
We have a few Bits that were sent to us - if any of you have news, please don’t hesitate to bring it by, or email us!


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Well, it is definitely winter here today. Snow is blowing and supposed to get even worse. I hope everyone is staying in if possible, as it could be dangerous out on the roads today. FEMA has even issued warnings for the midwest area.
Something to ponder: if global warming is such an issue, then where is all this cold and snow coming from???
Say a prayer today for the homeless folks who are trying to survive in this cold weather, and for the animals. Also on our prayer list is Vickie Eads, Mike Dickerson, Carrol Clingan, Richard Williams and David Jones.


Letter to the Editor
Only my opinion...
Dear Editor:
As a lifelong resident of the Lathrop community and have had four sons graduate from the Lathrop School system, I have witnessed years of favorite sons and daughters get special attention from teachers and/or coaches.


Common Sense Solutions for the Senate
A column by U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill
When I arrived in Congress, I realized that many of the Senate’s traditions are things America could be proud of, but there are also some rules and traditions that are just plain bad government. Just because “that’s the way we do things” is no excuse for secrets, back room deals, and political game playing. I’ve spent the last four years fighting the powers that be around here on how money is spent, trying to clean up federal contracting practices and improving transparency and oversight for Congress and the rest of the federal government.


BitsAbout Em
Good morning,
It’s 8:30 in the morning, and the sun is shining. It looks sooo good, and it is warming up. It will seem like a heat wave compared to the past few days, but we did need the snow and freezing temperatures, or so I am told.
You guessed it - no Bits this week.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Little warmer, but I hear that there is more snow and cold moving in. I, for one, am going to find a den and crawl in until summer!
We have a lot of folks who are in need of prayer this week: Carrol Clingan, Richard Williams, Mike Dickerson, Millie Green, Kim Wallace, David Jones, and many others with flu-like conditions and etc. Also pray for our country, Israel and for the healing of our land.


Letter to the Editor
To the Parents of 2011 Four-State Honor Choir students:
We will be leaving the parking lot of the High School at 7am sharp this coming Saturday morning, January 22, 2011. The concert for the Choir and Band start at 5:30pm in the Ron Houston Center for the Performing Arts, in the Mary Linn Auditorium (which is the large white building to the west of Bearcat Football Stadium).


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Cold - really cold, and lots of snow. However, the sun is shining, so maybe the snow is over. I hope so! I don’t enjoy the snow like I did 75 years ago. I didn’t mind the cold so much then, either, or the cost of food, and etc. Now it is a different story, as we become aware of the high cost of living. There are so many who are homeless and jobless, with only a slim hope of a better future.
So come election time, let us remember that a successful politician is a man who can stand on a fence and make people believe that it’s a platform. Let us pray for our country, our President, Israel and our service folks. Closer to home, continue to pray for Mike Dickerson, Vickie Eads, David Jones, Kim Wallace and each other.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Nice sunshine and warmer temperatures - isn’t it great?
Our holidays are now behind us, and with hopes of a better economy and more jobs, we should have a better year. At least, I pray so. Last year was tough for so many - if we only could get our companies back home where they belong, we would have a lot of jobs available.


Letter to the Editor
Dear Editor,
I have a few questions in regard to the article in last week’s Plattsburg paper, about a grant being approved for ADA improvements in Lathrop.

Why were no meeting notes read from the City’s ADA committee at the City Council meeting the night prior to the Plattsburg’s paper publication, to keep everyone up-to-date on their progress?


Be Our Guest
As voters, we have a duty to families to carefully consider who ends up on our Board of Education. Boards are responsible for oversight; oversight heeds effective education; and top-notch education can greatly affect the future of our kids, as well as our town! If a citizen feels current board members did not represent their best interests (or the interests of the town or students), April 5th is the opportunity to have them replaced with someone you feel will represent you.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Doesn’t this sun look wonderful? Especially after the frosted trees yesterday, which was also beautiful. So much beauty around us that we cannot duplicate. Praise God!
I just heard that someone stole the Baby Jesus from the nativity scene at the First Baptist Church. I would like to say to that someone: If you want Jesus, all you have to do is ask Him into your heart, and He is yours. No one can steal Him away from you. In the wee hours of the morning, just put Him back. Then ask His forgiveness, and ask Him into your heart to keep.


Be Our Guest
Steve Tinnen wrote an article in his paper regarding PWSD #4 last week and I must say that I was really disappointed by the level of rhetoric that came from the publisher. He began by referring to the board members as “players” and seemed to poke fun at Larry Golubski. He continued by taking statements out of context and not giving the full story.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Beautiful morning - the sun is shining so brightly that is almost hurts my eyes, but it is a most welcome sight.
As we approach Christmas Day, let us pray for the less fortunate ones, and give God praise for the gift of His Son Jesus, our Lord and Savior. Amen.
Our prayer list this week includes: David Jones, Doris Anne Butler, Jerry Archer, Christy Stewart, Kayla Clariday, John Munkers, our country and Israel.
Merry Christmas and God bless,
Edith
****


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Brrr! Cold! And everything is going up except jobs, social security and wages. Now I know that there are other parts of the country that are in worse shape than we are, but in my pity party, I sort of forgot about them - until I remembered the Reason for the season. Now, somehow, I am not so cold and my bills are not so high. My pity party is now a “Praise Party”.
Let us all remember Jesus is the reason for the season.


Letter to the Editor
Dear Editor,
I also saw the cross on the grain elevator. It was a special blessing to me, and I am sure it has been to others. I would like to say, “Please leave it up all year!”
Edith Webb


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Rather cool this morning, but guess it is time. I don’t have much news this week - folks must be busy with Christmas shopping and etc.
With so many people out of work and prices going up, we need to pray for our economy, and for God to heal our land. Remember that there are folks out there who are hungry, cold and homeless. Those of us that have food and shelter are so blessed, and if possible, we should share.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Cold, with snowflakes in the air. Oh well, it’s bound to happen sooner or later. I, for one, am so full of turkey that I couldn’t care less, as long as it is not over ankle deep and goes away fast!
Yesterday I received a call from Bill Gall in Dallas Texas, wishing all his friends a big hello and season’s greetings.


Letter to the Editor
Dear Editor,
Mondays are usually very busy, with several things to get done. This Monday was different - it was warm out for November 29, which made my traveling better, but I felt overwhelmed. I had several stops to make, and was backtracking to get things completed.


Bits About 'Em
Good frosty morning to you!
Weather sure changed in a hurry, just like Mike Thompson said it would.
By the time you all read this, you will be stuffed with turkey and pumpkin pie, and be preparing for Christmas.
Let us bring Jesus back on the scene by singing old favorites and wishing everyone a Merry Christmas. After all, Jesus is the reason for the season.
Our prayer list this week: Our country, Israel, service folks, Jerry Archer, Christy Stewart and David Jones.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Another beautiful morning - my kind of weather, as you might have read last week. We are faced with all the beautiful colors, then comes the sparkling snow and the shimmering ice, and in this case, a little rain mixed in. I just marvel at all the beauty God has given us; then comes spring, when all the sleeping greens wake up and start blooming, and again we have beauty.
Praise be to God. He is awesome, He gave us all this beauty and the love of His Son, that we might enjoy the life He has for us.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Beautiful morning - my kind of weather! Fall, with all the changing colors - what beauty! Then comes sparkling snow and shimmering ice; next is spring, when all the sleeping greens wake up and again we have beauty.
Please continue to pray for our country and the leaders of our country; our service men and women and each other.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Folks found it pretty cool this morning at 6:30 as they went to the polls to vote. By the time you read this, we will know who won what in the election. Sure hope for the right people to be in office, and for Godly wisdom to guide them.
Halloween is over and Thanksgiving Day approaching; as we begin the holiday season, let’s remember to be thankful for what we have, and also remember that Jesus is the reason for the season.


Letter to the Editor
Dear Editor,
Please print this invitation to attend or join the Parents’ Action Council meeting on Monday, November 8th, 7:00 p.m., at 16 Hubbard Place across the street from Hy-Klas. The Parents’ Action Council is a group of citizens who advocate for Lathrop students to promote diversity, appropriate education, special needs compliance and other students’ civil rights.
Thank you very much.
Thomas A. Briscoe, Lathrop


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
A lovely fall day - let’s enjoy this fall weather while we can!
Everyone is excited about the coming election. I urge you to be sure and vote; your vote might make a difference, and we sure could benefit from it.
Don’t forget the senior citizen dinner Friday the 29th at 11:00 at the First Assembly of God Church. Every senior is welcome.
Our prayer list this week: Jerry Archer, Christy Stewart, David Jones, Dorothy Stayton and each other. Also let’s continue to pray for our country, Israel and the leaders of our country, plus our service men & women.
Tell someone about Jesus this week!
God bless,
Edith


Letter to the Editor
Dear Editor,
Roy Blunt keeps saying the Robin Carnahan would be a rubber stamp for President Obama’s agendas simply because the President came to Missouri to give a speech on Robin Carnahan’s behalf. This is what Presidents have done during senatorial campaigns for years, whether Democrat or Republican.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Beautiful weather - rejoice and be glad in it! Continue to pray for our country and service men and women; also Janice McKee, Dorothy Renshaw, Shirley Tester, Dorothy Slayton and each other. God is good and He loves us.
God bless,
Edith
****
The residents of the senior housing attended a block party on Friday, sponsored by the board members.


Letter to the Editor
Dear Editor,
As a grade school student, I got off the bus at my grandfather’s farm after school one day, and still remember the large pictures of Eisenhower and Nixon hanging on the living room wall and wondering why they were there. In time, I began to understand that he was a staunch Repubican and believed that the Republican Party represented conservative candidates who valued honesty as well as individual rights, states’ rights and constitutional rights.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Little cool and damp this morning; supposed to be in the lower 70’s. We’ve certainly had perfect weather the past two weeks, but guess it is time for a change.
Have you ever noticed how some folks change with the weather? If it is too hot, they tend to grouch; if it is too cold, they get grumpy. While God is probably saying, “No matter what I do, I can’t make everyone happy”. But I know He tries, because He loves us.
Let’s continue to pray for the leaders of our country, Israel and our service folks.
Remember - hot, cold, wintry or mild, God really loves us. John 3:16.
God bless,
Edith
****
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Holman spent the weekend in St. Louis. While there, they attended the wedding of their niece, Kelly Holman, to Brian Kerlagon on Saturday afternoon.
****
Cletus & Francis Swihart, from St. Joseph, were Sunday afternoon visitors of Howard & Edith Webb.
****
John & Marilyn Francis attended the Art Crawl in Excelsior Springs on Friday afternoon. They saw many, many beautiful art pieces before going to Gladstone to visit Bob Francis & Jennifer. They had a delightful time playing with Baby Jacob.
****
Nancy Hensen celebrated her 80th birthday Saturday at the United Methodist Church with 40 family members and friends present. A great time was had by all, looking at old pictures, taking new ones and visiting. Cake and punch were served.
Happy birthday, Nancy!


Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor,
At the City Council meeting held on September 21, 2010, it was announced by the mayor of Lathrop, Jim Crenshaw, that he had given three Keys to the City to Mike Poland and three other officers of the Farmers State Bank in Cameron for their service of giving a very good loan to the Senior Citizens Housing complex in Lathrop.

Common Significance of the gesture of the giving of Keys to a City: The practice of bestowing a ceremonial “key to the city” dates back to medieval times.


Post Scripts
By Pauli Clariday
Plug in….

I am sitting here, writing a column on a Sunday night. I have no kids in school. I have no club or organization for which I am planning a meeting.

I know there are plenty others out there that are.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Fall and harvest time is here. The birds are leaving, squirrels storing up nuts and I am getting out winter clothes, as me and my long Johns are preparing for an early and cold winter.
I don’t have a lot of news again this week. Folks are going to games and on late vacations.
Don’t forget your flu shots next Monday.
Our prayer list this week: David Jones, Dan Snodgrass, Gerald & Judith Green, Shirley Bernard Tester and last, but not least, our country, leaders of our country, Israel and our service men & women.


Post Scripts
By Pauli Clariday
When it comes this Community Betterment and Chamber of Commerce thing, you and I both know this is not our first rodeo... We’ve all seen it. Great ideas and great people get a great start. Then somewhere along the line, we lose our way. Here is what I have learned that I think will give us maybe the ONLY footing to move forward.

Our purpose (a C of C) is to FIRST support the efforts of other organizations and volunteers that are already making things happen....


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Beautiful morning, my kind of weather. I could really enjoy this year-round, but I know that God’s plan for seasons changing is for the best.
Again, I don’t have too much news, but I am really glad to be back on the job. Howard is holding his own, and I am up and at ‘em. I’m giving God the glory, and giving credit to the prayers of all our friends.
Let’s continue to pray for our country and the leaders of our country, Israel and each other.


Be Our Guest
Five years ago we, the people of Lathrop, created a Comprehensive Plan. The City Council voted to approve it and paid $17,000 for it. We are LONG OVERDUE in implementing it! We have a meeting planned for October 5, Tuesday 7 pm at Betty Brazelton Community Center. Please attend!


Post Scripts
By Pauli Clariday
Not a likely (or even correct) front page article, but this was the only spot they left for me. :)

I am excited about this week’s edition. Not because there is a great, scathing article about some public entity, or because some investigative reporting uncovered facts that the public “has a right to know.” Those things make for good newspapers, but this week, and hopefully every week, the Rural Reporter can bring you positive news about your community.

This issue marks the first of our Fifth Week’s Free issues. About four or five times a year, a month has five edition dates.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Well, fall is really on its way, and before we can say “Jack Robinson”, it will be cold, snow, etc.
Now for Bits, would you believe that everyone I called was either not home, or did nothing? So I don’t have much to say, except perhaps someone has e-mailed or called in some news.
Let’s finish out our month by continuing to pray for our country, service folks, Israel and each other.
Give someone a big smile and a howdy do this week!
God bless,
Edith
****


Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor,
In the past I have had an issue with the road I live on, needing gravel. I called the County Commissioner, Jim Crenshaw (at the time). He immediately took care of the problem and gravel was put on the road I live on. After getting fast results, I thought I’d try again.

Recently I called the current County Commissioner, Randall Relford, whom I thought I could trust to take of the problem. I voiced my concern regarding several large logs, stacked on the county’s road side on both Brown Road and N.E. 56th street. They have been stacked there for several months. Just recently they were moved again and made into one pile on Brown Road.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Once again, I am filling in for our dear Edith. As most of you know, she recently sat at Howard’s bedside while he was hospitalized, and this week, she became ill and had to go to the hospital herself. She returned home this morning, but obviously has not been able to make calls for the Bits.
This is Homecoming week here in Lathrop - hopefully everyone can attend the parade at 2:15 on Friday and the football game at 7 on Friday night. With a little luck, it won’t rain on these events!
Please keep Edith & Howard on your prayer list, along with Mr. & Mrs. Paul Boyd and Hannah Evanson. Also don’t forget to lift up the leaders of our government, service men & women and their families, Israel and each other.
God bless,
Candy, filling in for Edith
****


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Love this weather, but you know before we can say Jack Robinson, it will be cold.
Not much news this week - folks were not home when I made calls last night.
As you know, I took Howard to the hospital last Tuesday and brought him home on Friday. he is resting and doing fair, but I now have to stay home with him for a while.
Let us continue to pray for our country; especially the leaders of our country. They need some Godly wisdom. Also pray for each other and for Paul Boyd.
God bless,
Edith
****


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Edith had to take Howard to the hospital very early this morning, so was unable to finish the Bits this week. He has responded to treatment and is doing well, and Edith has returned home, where she is getting some much-needed rest.
The rain we got didn’t do much to cool things off; rather, once the sun came out, it was hot and sticky. Just hope we have a nice weekend for those end-of-season barbecues and picnics!
On our prayer list this week, we have Paul Boyd, Jr., Friederun Boone, Doris Berry, Dorothy Renshaw, Don Burkholder, and please keep Howard & Edith in your prayers as well. Continue to pray for our country and for Israel, as well.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Beautiful weather - just right, but they say it will turn hot again. However, I look for an early winter and colder temps than last year. Now that I won’t like too much.
I don’t have much news this week, but let us continue to pray for our government, Israel, service men and women and each other. Our “At home” prayer list this week: Vikki Eads, Lois Sumpter, Melanie Elliott, Bee Hurt, Marie Tarver and each other.
God bless,
Edith
Give someone a howdy doo and a big smile this week!
****


Man on the Street
What is your opinion of Lathrop R-II's new 4-day school week? What did you do on your first Monday off?

Click thumbnail and scroll to view photos and answers of participating subjects.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Real nice and cool this morning - it sure can stay that way.
Last night, just before dinner, Peggy came over with a tomato that weighed 1 lb. 3 oz. Now let me tell you, the war is on again big time, as I have one that is about ready to turn that may beat hers by at least an ounce. I have my poodle dog standing guard, so she doesn’t mess with it! So, as it stands now, I buy ice cream for the first and most tomatoes, but will have to let you know who buys for the biggest one.


Be Our Guest
I went to the city council meeting Tues. night and was dismayed at several items during the meeting, but was re-energized after the meeting was over. A gentleman from Des Moines, IA had come to Lathrop’s city council meeting to visit with the administrators of Lathrop. He follows eclipses around the world and has discovered there is a solar eclipse to occur in 7 years in the US, that will cross hair in Lathrop. This has the potential to be a neat tourist attraction as this hasn’t occurred in the US since 1979, and doesn’t occur in the US very often. Several of us from Lathrop, including Pauli, Lathrop Rural Reporter, were visiting about the potential this could draw and how to get started on doing something with this. We were getting very excited. What an opportunity! He described the eclipse’s path across the globe as taking a single spaghetti and laying it on the earth to find the most desired location to see the eclipse and its best advantage being right here. I’m sure there will be more to come on this.


Letter to the Editor
After reading the paper last week I went back to my previously submitted letter. It’s true, I stand corrected. My statement about the bridges mentioned “nearly a half-million”.

I also misspoke about the property for the pool. I would like the opportunity to correct those statements. I guess I should have said that the bridge project will cost well over a quarter-million dollars and that the city currently owns property that would accommodate a very nice and large pool.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Little warm out there, and heating up, so stay inside where it is cool if possible!
I was talking to a lady yesterday that told me she just threw her veggies in her pool, as it was so hot. Now what would you call that mixture? Pool soup!
Now, about the tomato war that so many of you have asked about...
Peggy and Jim win this year, hands down. They have tomatoes running out their ears. Nice, big, juicy ones, too. Mine are just beginning to turn, and not too big, either. So I am buying the ice cream this year, and resigning... you bet your life I don’t! Anyway, they sure have been nice, and have offered me some.


Letter to the Editor
To Editor,
With all the controversy regarding a four day school week, it’s not the number of days a child goes to school, but what is important is whether the child applies him/herself and wants to learn what the school is teaching. If he/she does not want to take advantage of what the school is offering, then he/she won’t learn any more in five days than in four.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Another hot day - I am about cooked, and I stay in as much as possible. I sure feel sorry for those that work outside, and the poor animals that have no shade.
My tomatoes are about ready to turn - sure have a few nice ones. I haven’t talked to Peggy yet, nor have I sneaked a peek - too hot to do that!
Howard and I enjoyed some of the Festival, but it was also too hot for us to do much.
Our prayer list this week: Vickie Eads, Lois Sumpter, David Foster, Dick Lanning, Melanie Elliott, and of course our President, Israel, country and our service men and women.


Editor's Comments
In response to the Letter to the Editor (published 7/22/10 in the Rural Reporter, titled “Bring Back the Pool” submitted by Mr. Jeff Streeter, Lathrop), Mayor Crenshaw and City Administrator Don Moore brought to the newspaper office an official city document (FY2010 Application: Form A - Project Profile Application for the Community Development Block Grant) which states the: Bridge Replacement Project (South, Oak, Short and Clinton street bridges) requested funds in the amount of $199,500 with local cash funds of $80,000 and local in-kind funds of $4,000 for a total project cost of $283,500. Not the half million dollars Mr. Streeter stated in his letter.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Little warm this morning, going to be about 90 degrees or better by afternoon, so I think I’ll just stay inside and go out when the sun goes down. I won’t howl at the moon, though, or hoot with the hoot owls - too old!
We have several on our prayer list this week: Lois Sumpter, Vickie Eads, David Foster, Ron Bullock, Dorothy Renshaw, Carlie Hope, Dick Lanning, Thomas Earhart and our usual - our government, service men & women, Israel and don’t forget each other.
God bless,
Edith


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Nice shower we had earlier - still a few sprinkles, but it is a lot cooler. Really it is just about right - for me, that is. But everyone has their own notion, is what the little old lady said as she kissed the cow.
My tomatoes are just about ready to turn, and I have plenty on those 6 plants - so many that the birds tried to snip them completely off.
Folks on our prayer list this week are: Vickki Eads, David Foster, Lois Sumpter, Carly Hope and Sharon Wilson.


Letter to the Editor
Lathrop has always been great place to live. The festivals, fairs, and gatherings make it the perfect small town. Over the summer I’ve noticed empty streets. The kids just don’t have much to do on a normal week. We sure could use a place for the kids during the summer. I remembered when people were pushing to get a new pool, which was almost a done deal. The McGinnis family was willing to donate the necessary land from the kindness of their hearts. Then, there was an election and suddenly the city was “broke”.


Be Our Guest
To the Methodist Church Family,
Thank you from ALL of our hearts for the wonderful privilege of spending 10 fruitful years in the Methodist Parsonage. God bless you richly for the ministry that has occurred in Lathrop because you allowed us to do what God has birthed in our hearts.

During the time we have lived in this home we received 8 of our 9 grandchildren.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Real foggy early this morning, but supposed to be in the upper 90’s by noon, which I can do without - can’t you?
The tomato war is going strong! My tomatoes are loaded, also the weeds are plentiful.
Not too much news this week. Folks are looking forward to the Mud Run and Friendship Festival, also doing last minute shopping and etc. before school starts in 30 days.
For our prayer list this week, remember Jim Schoonover, Carly Hope, Mary Wilson and Jerod Flentie. Jerod is Millie Green’s nephew, and he is in the burn unit at KU Medical Center. Also let’s pray for our nation, Israel, our service men & women and especially for the leaders of our country.
God bless,
Edith


Letter to the Editor
Dear Editor,
As I read the paper the other day, I couldn’t help but notice that there had been several arrests made throughout the county. As glad as I was, it struck me as odd to see that the bonds set were “cash only”. I had just been speaking with my wife about this a few weeks prior. I sent an editorial to another local newspaper, but they did not print it. The editorial was about people in the county being arrested and held for silly things while others commit more serious crimes, but are not prosecuted.

We have one man shooting at his neighbor’s house, and my ex-wife and her husband threatening me in a police department parking lot, without any consequences at all.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Beautiful morning - the sunrise at 6:30 this morning was spectacular. Only our Creator and Heavenly Father could provide us with such beauty.
Let us spend this week in prayer for our President, leaders of our country, Israel and the healing of our land. And of course each other.
God bless,
Edith
P.S. Remember to give thanks for our blessings, which are plentiful!
****


Be Our Guest
Editor’s Note: Kathy Seifner was a guest columnist for the Rural Reporter (then known as the Lathrop News) for many of our early years. She now lives in South Missouri with her two children, Lydia and Ben, who are now all grown up--like so many of the little ones I remember from those years.

Kathy suffers from diabetes and was blind from cataracts for some time.

Facebook has allowed me to find old friends I thought were long gone. The following column is from her blog. She has been gracious enough to let me share it here.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Beautiful morning - little cooler today, with a promise of a good holiday.
Sure hope we have good weather for the Festival.
Then we go into August, with reunions, school starting and Labor Day. I tell you, time is really flying.
With the Gospel being preached to every nation, it is time to get prayed up, packed up and look up. Jesus is on the way.
So, in the meantime, while we are praying, let’s include the leaders of our country, Israel, service men and women and each other.


Letters to the Editor
Dear Friends,

An African proverb states that “The one who does not ask questions loses the way”. Hence:

What is going on? What are you doing? Why don’t we, the voting public, know about your envisioned projects for Clinton County? What minds would be in control? How do we find out?


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Today’s weather is supposed to be really hot, but hopefully will be no more storms, like on Saturday. We don’t want to be blown into the next county!
Saturday’s storm sort of messed up the Antique Tractor & Car Show, but now onto the 4th of July celebration. Before we know it, school will be starting all over again. Time is really flying fast. Seems like yesterday our youngest great granddaughter was starting kindergarten. Now this year, she is starting college! Wow! But I will wait a while before greeting our great great grandchildren.
Let’s continue to pray for our country, Israel, service men & women and the oil spill. Closer to home, include Pam Grady and each other.
God bless,
Edith


Letter to the Editor
Dear Norma Ward of the Rural Reporter,
I wanted to take this opportunity to share with you and your Readers facts regarding FEMA Funding for the Village of Turney.

In December of 2007 our Village was damaged, as were many others, by the severe ice storms; weather that really hit our town hard. The village was inundated with broken limbs and fallen debris, which blocked the Village’s streets. This hindered emergency response, and the ice accumulations on trees in the park caused limbs to fall, covering the park with damaging debris. The roadway known as North Ridge was also damaged. I, Jim Gorham, met with FEMA Officials in response to the clean up of damages our Village would be facing in order to get some monetary assistance.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Rain, rain, go away, come again another month! We need to dry up. The kids want to play and men need to be in the fields. Only in this part of the country could the weather be so changeable.
Let us continue to pray for our country, our service men and women, Israel and also for the oil well spill that needs to be stopped. We need to add Pam Grady, Vickie Paxton and Judy Green to our prayer list, and of course, each other.
God bless,
Edith


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
For ducks, that is! It is really raining hard here at 8:00 a.m., but supposed to quit by noon. Hope so.
Well, I don’t have much news again this week. Folks are busy with baseball, softball and Bible School.
David & Mary Jo Brown took their grandson, David Robbins, of Liberty, to Maryville, MO this week, for Band Camp; and Howard & I enjoyed lunch at the Olive Garden last Saturday, as a Mothers and Fathers Day treat, with son John and his wife Brandi.


Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor,
I have been reading letters from people who apparently don’t have a nice thing to say about our school district, or its administration. I just cannot be silent any longer. It would be easy to begin by attacking the writers of previous letters, questioning their purpose or integrity, but I cannot see that that would be helpful. Besides, my experience has been that those who complain the loudest are often the least involved. I think it’s time to move from the poisonous letters, which I don’t think serve our children or our community very well.
Our school district is not perfect, but I can say it is progressing.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
No bits this week; however, I did see lots of folks at the Memorial Day services yesterday. The service was great, and it was an honor to shake the hands of our older vets. Our prayers go out for all our vets and their families, both past and present.
Folks, June is the half-way mark for this year, so let’s continue to keep our country, Israel, service men & women and the leaders of our country, state and city in our prayers. Also the job market.
First let us seek the Kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all the things will be added unto us (Matthew 6:33).
The name of the Lord is a strong tower, the righteous run into it and are safe. Proverbs 18:10
God bless and keep you,
Edith


Letter to the Editor
Dear Editor,
I am a parent of two autistic children here in Lathrop. When this School Board forced this 4 day week on us, claiming that they are trying to save $120,000, I felt compelled to write this letter.

Over the last 10 years, we have had to spend our entire life savings fighting this School District and how they treat the children here.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
We wanted sunshine - well, we got it big time!
Not much news this week. Folks are catching up from graduation and getting ready for Memorial Day weekend.
Howard & I enjoyed the film “Jesus”, and lunch at the Assembly of God Church on Friday.
Everyone is asking me about my tomatoes. Well, let me tell you - on Thursday, I planted 4 beautiful, expensive plants, and 2 hours later, the birds had swiped off all the leaves. So, on Saturday, we bought some replacements, and had dinner at Gino’s, in Kearney. Came home and planted the new ones - bingo! Two hours later, they worked on the leaves again. I never had that happen before! Anyhow, I have them covered up now, and maybe the birds will get the idea.


Bus Transportation for Lathrop 4-Day School Week
In clarification of statements concerning transportation for Lathrop District students for the 4-Day School Week:
Mr. Anthony Peoples. “I am not at liberty to discuss any figures until after Thursday, May 20th meeting with School Administrators, Athletic Directors and myself, but preliminary negotiations were held prior to the Board’s vote to go to a 4-day school week. During the meeting of May 20th, discussions on extra curriculums activities and regular bus routes will impact the final outcome.”


Editor's Comments
In response to last week’s Only My Opinion letter to the editor by Ed Shrewsbury, Mayor Crenshaw provided the Rural Reporter with the official Preliminary Engineering Report for Bridge and Culvert Replacements City of Lathrop, Missouri, prepared by McDonald & Warger, Inc. Consulting Engineers, Liberty, Missouri. Date Submitted April 7, 2010 with the State of Missouri Registered Professional Engineer seal, Leroy Allen Rader, stating on page 2-1 Section 2 Description of Need:
The Oak Street concrete arch culvert is in need of replacement due to deterioration of the concrete wingwall separation, undercut of the arch base, and the sidewalk over the structure has collapsed due to the loss of backfill material.


Letter to the Editor
By Thomas Briscoe
The purpose of a state audit is to get access to accurate answers to public questions. One is particularly useful when a tax-supported, public school regularly gives its shareholders bogus information, such as “we show 85% of parents (overwhelming support) for the 4-day school week”. If there was ever a community that would benefit from such an investigation, it would be Lathrop. And to frustrated parents, who go through the proper channels but never get answers, it truly is long overdue. The very question of who is going to pay for the audit exemplifies why we need an audit in the first place. Jerry Archer wrote to the Lathrop citizens last week that the amount would be around $30,000 and be charged to taxpayers. The fact was, he wasn’t sure. He guessed.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning, sunshine!
Isn’t this great? Let is shine, let it shine, let it shine! I vote no rain for at least a week - we need to dry up.
Wasn’t the graduation great? Let us pray for our graduates as they embark on their beginnings of adulthood; also our country, Israel, service men & women and each other. Also remember Warren Crisman and praise the Lord for our sunshine!
God bless,
Edith
P.S. Remember our senior luncheon at the Assembly of God Church at 10:30 Friday morning, May 21st. We will see the movie “Jesus” and enjoy a wonderful lunch plus good fellowship. See you there!


Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor,
“Tough choices”, “blazing our own trail”, “cowboy up”, “show me another way”. All are phrases used by Lathrop school board members during the last board meeting when they voted and passed the 4 day school week. A decision made to decrease the $9.4 million budget by $120,000, a 1.2% decrease.
At a community meeting in April, Dr. Blackburn (superintendent) explained that a projected savings of $27,000 would come from transportation, and the remaining $90,000 would be savings on hourly employees. Let us examine these.
People’s Transportation, the contractor who provides bus service for our school district, had never been consulted on the matter of possible savings prior to the final vote! REALLY?!!


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Weather still wet and cool - will there be a food shortage this year, due to these weather conditions? Let us pray for a good harvest, and the wisdom to cultivate and store what we get.
Folks, these are trying times. We should all continue to pray for wisdom and endurance through these times, especially for our government; also state and city. I personally think some unwise choices have been made. But remember - if God is for us, who can be against us?
Put Warren Crismon on our prayer list this week, and keep smiling. You are still on God’s Candid Camera.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Another beautiful day the Lord hath made, let us rejoice and be glad of it!
We certainly have a lot of activity coming up - graduation, Mother’s Day, Decoration Day, and then Father’s Day, and etc. Time sure flies when one is having fun, but I am not ready for it to fly into snow again too soon.
Not much news this week, and praise the Lord, no new illness that I heard of. Just continue praying for our country and Israel, also service men and women and the leaders of state and city governments. Don’t forget to pray for each other!
God bless,
Edith


Letters to the Editor
Dear School Board Members:
In regards to the 4 day school week that is being proposed by the Lathrop School Board, I have returned my survey for the preference of the “day off”. As noted it is checked “No Preference”. Following is an explanation of my decision and to further clarify my standing on this very unwise decision being made for the parents in the Lathrop School District. The “4 Day School Week” in studies has been shown to have both positive and negative affects for students, teachers and parents where this has been implemented. However, the negative affects outweigh the positive.
First and foremost this is in my opinion a decision that should be made by the parents of the children attending school in the Lathrop District; this is not a decision that should be made by the members of the School Board or the Superintendent of this district.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Whoop tee do - I really enjoyed some lip-smacking good mushrooms on Saturday, thanks to Dan, who always makes a special trip to bring me a mess every spring.
It sure is good to see the sun shining this morning, after the week of cool and rainy days.
I wonder if it is all the space doo dads, high powered jets, or just the signs of the latter days that has anything to do with the bizarre weather and changes of seasons?
Our prayers need to be continued this week for our country, Israel, service men and women, jobs, and now also for the tornado victims.


Letters to the Editor
The deadline for defending our children’s education for 5-day school weeks ends in early May. Not only is the 4-day week unpractical for education, family schedules, post-graduation endeavors, and how kids learn, but it doesn’t seem to represent the Lathrop parents either. Recently I have been passing a petition door-to-door to ask parents and tax payers how they feel. I don’t know if I will make it all the way through Lathrop on time (and, of course, everyone isn’t always home), but, so far, 62% of households are against the 4-day week; 8% are for the 4-day week; and 30% have no opinion.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Another beautiful day - the mushrooms are coming up. Remember, if you get an overload and it creates a problem, I can help you with that!
No bits again this week - folks are busy cleaning yards and planting flowers and gardens. As we start a new season, let us be thankful that the cold and snow is behind us.


Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor,
On Saturday, in Los Angeles, a hero was laid to rest. Thousands of mourners from every walk of life came to his funeral. Was he a president, an athlete, a movie star, or a soldier? No. He was a math teacher. His name was Jaime Escalante. Several of his former students, while sobbing, said that they had to come and be at his funeral. Escalante had changed their lives. Some of you may remember the 1988 movie “Stand and Deliver” that was based on his true story, his character played by James Edward Olmos.
But, in case you missed it, let me tell you his story.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Beautiful morning - lots of sunshine, warm and dry, which is good for the farmers and gardeners.
Everyone is anxious to start planting. Me, I’ll just plant about 4 tomato plants, 1 cucumber and 1 pepper. If I need more tomatoes, I’ll just visit my friend Peggy. They should be great this year, as I am willing her my green thumb.
No Bits today; no one was home when I made my calls.
Howard & I did attend the Senior Lunch at the Assembly of God Church on Friday. We enjoyed a good praise and worship service, plus a delicious dinner of fried chicken with all the trimmings. Next month, we plan on seeing the movie “Jesus” before lunch. So plan to be there - we’ll have a great time.


Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor, Patrons, Registered Voters and students of the Lathrop School District:

Accountability, Conflict of Interest, Ethics and Transparency. Buzz words like these are used a lot lately in the public education systems through-out the state of Missouri. Several school districts state-wide have been under scrutiny for lack of accountability, conflict of interests, lack of ethical practices and covering up their staff and administrators unethical practices and/or abuse of position, and even board members unethical practices. These type of scandals cause community members to doubt their public officials’ efforts.

Recently, what appears to be a conflict of interest and definitely a violation of school board policies, the Lathrop School District has been placed under scrutiny for their current practices, non-disclosure and non-adherence to policy and procedures.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
What a beautiful Easter Sunday! Sunrise service was awesome. Very annointed, with the praise team - a God-given blessing. Followed by a good breakfast and great fellowship - truly a blessing to have been there.
The weatherman said the rest of the week will be partly stormy, so-o-o-o, prepare!
Let us pray this week for our country, service folks and the leaders of our country and city. Also for David Foster, Sandra Gastineau, Sue Blackford, Caitlin O’Connor and each other.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
I do believe that spring has finally arrived. With all the beautiful sunshine and warm temps, it makes me think abut tomatoes and the tomato war that Peggy and I have going. Think I’ll just will her my green thumb this year, and eat her tomatoes. She works, so I won’t have any trouble getting a few while she is at her job.
Folks, let us pray for the leaders of our country and city, our service folks and Israel. Closer to home, Pete Barnes, Michael Holman and each other.
Don’t forget to praise God for our beautiful sunshine, and be sure to give someone a smile today.
God bless,
Edith
*


Letter to the Editor
Dear Editor,
I wish to take this opportunity to expand on your well written story last week on “Stolen Property Recovered”. By now, most of Lathrop is well aware that the largest and most expensive items taken were out of my storage locker. While it is true that some items have been returned, most are yet to be found. To us, the important items have been returned, and although damaged, they are a welcome sight.


Missouri Tigers Basketball
It was a different March for the Missouri Tigers this time. After last year’s avalanche of a surprise Big 12 Tournament Championship in Oklahoma City, the blossoming of a deep NCAA Tournament run in the wonderfully quirky town of Boise, and finally those surreal, thunderous moments in the Arizona desert, this year was merely a two-game blur in Buffalo.
And yet, it was a success. In a rebuilding year, despite a key injury to Justin Safford late in the year, despite a handful of tough losses in which the Tigers blew leads, Missouri still made the tournament and even won its first-round game. As a 10 seed, the Tigers beat No. 7-seeded Clemson and pushed No. 2 seed West Virginia to the very end of their second-round game.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
A beautiful sunny day the Lord hath made, let us rejoice and be glad in it.
However, with the weather and gas prices, folks aren’t getting out much, so don’t have much news.
Let us not forget that we have so much to be thankful for. Some folks have had lots more snow, mudslides, earthquakes and etc., so let’s begin by giving God thanks and praying for the healing of our land, our leaders, service men & women and Israel. Closer to home, remember Merle & Millie Green, Pete Barnes, Madeline Hickman, folks at the Senior Community Village and of course, each other.


Letters to the Editor
Thank you Jack Berhorst and Rural Reporter! Both of you are more refreshing than a dip in a cold creek.
The news media in the entire world never, ever mentions a talented kid like Jack Berhorst...and why? Because he shoots guns.
The two of you have pointed out what the rest of the country just can’t get into their heads. And that is the fact that of the 300,000,000 guns in the U.S.A., only a tiny fraction are used by the criminal element. The huge majority are used by the Jack Berhorst’s of the world doing what they do best - shooting targets and hunting.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Spring is trying its best to “spring”, but still a little slow. Maybe it’s waiting for March 20th to arrive, as that is the official date.
It sure has been a long, hard winter. We older folks are waiting to thaw out and the kids are wanting sunshine to hunt Easter eggs. Even the robins and animals are looking for some good old sunshine.
Folks, this week let us pray for Pete Barnes, our country, service men and women and each other. Also for lower prices and lots of jobs, and of course, some good old sunshine.


Letter to the Editor
Dear Norma,
As a very happy subscriber, and one who has enjoyed meeting you on several of our Rotary events - I have the occasion to submit a “Letter to the Editor”.
I LOVE the Rural Reporter and especially the way you quote, or rather print, quotes heard at city council meetings.


Missouri Tigers Basketball
Time to dance
On the eve of the NCAA Tournament, it always strikes me how close greatness is. On the brackets I pore over this time of year it’s only about a finger length away from every team’s starting point. Any team in the tournament is a mere four wins away from being immortalized by making the Final Four, six wins away from the title. The optimism is palpable. I love this time of year. Buzzer-beaters, live look-ins, those deafening crowds.
Missouri has been in this position many times, with this being the Tigers’ 24th NCAA Tournament appearance. (Yes, this is the second-most NCAA Tournament appearances without a Final Four, trailing Brigham Young University by one. Missouri is also second in most tournament wins without a Final Four with 21, and could tie Boston College for that dubious distinction with a first-round win.)


Letters to the Editor
To Whom it May Concern:
The death of a little girl killed by a school bus in Kansas City, KS should be a wake-up call to the residents of Lathrop, especially those parents of children attending the elementary and middle schools.
In most areas of Lathrop, there are no sidewalks, and the few existing sidewalks are in very poor condition. I see children in all kinds of weather walking two, three and four abreast down the middle of the street on their way to school.


Missouri Tigers Basketball
To get everyone ready for the conference tournament and the March Madness that it kicks off, here are 12 facts about the Big 12 Tournament.
1. Kansas has the most tournament titles, with six. Oklahoma has won three, Oklahoma State has two and Missouri and Iowa State each have one tournament title.
2. Only two players have won back-to-back tournament MVP awards, Kansas’ Paul Pierce in 1997 and 1998 and Oklahoma’s Hollis Price in 2002 and 2003.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Snow, snow - going once, going twice - gone, by the end of the week, I hope! I mean, really gone.
I guess you noticed that March really came in like a lamb. So you know that now March is supposed to go out like a lion. I hope he gets his tail caught in the door on the way out. I am ready for some sunshine, mild weather, spring flowers and green grass growing.
Folks, let’s start March off by praising God for the blessings He has already given us, with all the snows, earthquakes and etc. around us. We have truly been blessed. Also include in our prayers our service men and women, our leaders and Israel. Closer to home, pray for Mary Pollard, Gerald Green, Marge Harris and each other.


Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor:
What would you do? You make the choice. Don’t look for a punch line, there isn’t one. Read it anyway. My question is, would you have made the same choice?
At a fundraising dinner for a school that serves children with learning disabilities, the father of one of the students delivered a speech that would never be forgotten by all who attended. After extolling the school and its dedicated staff, he offered a question: “When not interfered with by outside influences, everything nature does is done with perfection. Yet my son, Shay, cannot learn things as other children do. He cannot understand things as other children do. Where is the natural order of things in my son?”


Missouri Tigers Basketball
Last Saturday, with the Tigers on a three-game winning streak, I went full of confidence on a road trip with a few of my friends to the Tigers’ basketball game at Kansas State.
Now, I have some experience with road trips to Manhattan, the Little Apple, having attended three football games there with my siblings. This was something different, however, my first trip to watch the Tigers play in Bramlage Coliseum, Kansas State’s manic Octagon of Doom. (The nickname given to the octagon-shaped arena.) I had heard about how this was one of the toughest places to play in the Big 12, and I wanted to see for myself. This is the Show-Me State.
The first thing you notice about a trip to Manhattan is the limestone. With Manhattan nestled in the Flint Hills, a rolling expanse of the biggest remaining stretch of prairie left in America, the whitish tan rock juts out everywhere. Limestone houses, a limestone courthouse, limestone businesses, even a limestone church.


Letters to the Editor
Pauli,
I have read and enjoyed the Rural Reporter for many years. The recent copy dated Thursday, February 18, 2010 front page was one of the worst I have ever viewed. The article about the City Council meeting makes (us) the Lathrop residence sound like uneducated red necks.


Missouri Tigers Basketball
By guest columnist Benjamin Herrold
With two nice wins last week, one a resounding home win over formerly foreboding Texas, the other a mature win at Nebraska, Missouri has moved to the brink of being a lock for the NCAA Tournament. The Tigers (20-7, 8-4 in Big 12) are tied for third in the conference after being picked to finish seventh in the preseason poll.
The Texas win, Missouri’s third straight over the Longhorns, was another electric Mizzou Arena game. Blackout! Bill Raftery in the house! Although Texas has slipped to just a notch above mediocrity, at 7-5 in the Big 12 this year and 16-12 in conference games since the start of last season (but a more impressive 16-10 against teams other than the mighty Tigers), it was still a solid win over a ranked team.
The Nebraska game showed this team has grown and improved this season. They fell behind 11-1 against a team that everyone hates to play because of their scrappy defense and offense that just seems to get slower… and slower… and slower.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
A good day, that is if you are an Eskimo! But praise God we aren’t knee deep in snow or mudslides, floods and etc. We can always praise God no matter what.
God bless and give someone a smile today - everyone needs a smile!
Edith
****
Mr. & Mrs. Barry Todd; Mr. & Mrs. Porter Hensen, Cassidy & Griffen enjoyed pizza and soft ice cream on Saturday evening at Gambino’s.
****


Letters to the Editor
Dear Pauli,
Enclosed is our check in the amount of $74.70 for a 2 year renewal to the Rural Reporter!
I really do look forward to receiving each issue every week! It’s always refreshing to read about all the things that are happening in my old home town - and I continue to enjoy following the progress of the Lathrop Mules (both the boys & girls!). It surely does bring back great memories of my experiences so many years ago!!
And, I can’t help but note the ages of those listed in the Obituaries are younger than I am (a lot more often than they used to be!!). Do you suppose that is a message telling me something??


Missouri Tigers Basketball
Missouri fans are no doubt tired of weeks in which their team posts an encouraging win but also drops a gut-wrenching loss. I know I’m tired of writing columns about such weeks.
Sure enough, Missouri (18-7, 6-4 Big 12) fought off Iowa State at home on Wednesday and lost at Baylor on Saturday when the Bears had roughly 72 chances to tip in the winning basket in the final seconds.
Not surprisingly, this week has brought out both the pessimist and optimist viewpoints for Tiger fans.
First, the bad news. In those final seconds at Baylor, it was clear yet again that interior play is a glaring weakness for this team.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Wind chill 10 below zero - now that’s cold! But I guess the weather is much worse around us - others have much more snow, no electricity and etc., so I won’t complain too much.
Not much local news again this week - just too cold for anyone to go anywhere if one doesn’t have to.
In our prayers this week, lets pray for those who are less fortunate than we are, also our country, Israel, service men and women and the leaders of our country. Also each other, and Howard Webb.
God bless; keep smiling and remember - with God for us, who can be against us?
Edith
****
Betty Cutting, of Lathrop, and her sister, Hazel Johnston, of Liberty, MO, enjoyed a wonderful birthday party on Saturday, February 6 at the Senior Center.


Missouri Tigers Basketball
The bizarro week
Missouri had something of a bizarro week in its last two games, calling to mind the “Seinfeld” episode where George Costanza does the opposite of whatever would be normal for him.
The Tigers (17-6, 5-3 Big 12) blew an 11-point second-half lead to Texas A&M on Wednesday, seeing their 32-game home winning streak go out in a blaze of missed jumpers and Aggie rebounds. (My apologies for gushing about the home winning streak last week; feel free to blame me for the loss if you must.) On Saturday, Missouri went on the road, took a commanding lead, and then fended off any rally attempts by the home team.
Although discussing the Texas A&M game is similar to picking a hangnail, it needs to be said: This loss narrowed the road for Missouri to the NCAA Tournament, though it’s still an open, quite feasible road. (More on that later.) But to sum up how ghastly the blown lead was as quickly as possible: From the 14:36 mark of the second half to the 1:26 mark, the Aggies outscored Missouri 28-8 and outrebounded the Tigers 21-6.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
With a high of about 32 degrees, cloudy and with the Groundhog seeing his shadow on Gobbler’s Knob at 6:30 this morning, I guess it will be another 6 weeks of the same.
Not much news again this week - if you have something you want to share, just give me a call at home or send it by e-mail.
I am staying home with Howard as he recuperates from his heart attack 2 weeks ago.
When that happened, our family sure came to our rescue, driving me back and forth - due to fog and stress, they didn’t want me to drive. Norma, Pauli and Dan stood by and shuttled me back and forth and whatever else was needed. What a blessing to have such a loving family, plus all the prayers from our friends and neighbors. May God bless each and every one of them, according to the needs.


Missouri Tigers Basketball
Missouri’s first five conference games saw the Tigers record paltry shooting percentages, including 32.1 percent on three-pointers and 37.5 percent from inside the three-point line, and generally appear to be shooting a round ball at a square rim. Then, last Saturday, the Tigers (16-5, 4-2 in Big 12 play through Sunday) broke out of this unsustainably poor level of shooting with a net-scorching performance in a 95-80 win over Oklahoma State.


Bits About 'Em
Hello all-
This is Pauli filling in for Edith. As many of you know, she has spent the week at the hospital with Howard, who is now home and recovering.
I know she is forever grateful for her prayer partners and warriors that not only prayed for Grandpa, but who continue to lift her up in prayer for continued strength and peace.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Another gloomy day - little warmer, that’s all. But we are still better off than those around us.
Folks, with this severe cold, overload of snow, earthquakes, loss of jobs and high prices, we are in a terrible situation. We need to get on our knees and pray for Godly wisdom and intervention in our present time of need, and for those that are less fortunate than us.
The world is pushing God away and leaving Him out of everything. Christians, it is time to proclaim that God is here in our ever present time of need, now and forever.
On our prayer list this week: Haiti, Israel, Leonard Eads, Dorothy Renshaw and each other. Remember to seek God daily.


Letter to the Editor
Dear Editor,
There’s a large problem in the town of Lathrop.
I’m a parent of teen-age children, one of which is in serious need of help. The problem is teen-age drinking, smoking and drug use.
With proof in hand, I requested the help of the Lathrop police. Much to my surprise, the police seemed to have more interest in helping protect “the party crowd”.
This is an issue that started back in June of last year. At that time, I contacted the Lathrop Police Department and explained what was going on and was shocked at their response.


Missouri Tigers Basketball
The Missouri Tigers battled through two road games last week. Missouri (14-4, 2-1 in Big 12 play) churned out an overtime win at Texas Tech and lost at Oklahoma, though the Tigers no doubt could have won that game.
The media provided plenty of buzz last week about how difficult it is to win on the road in the Big 12, but it’s tough to overstate the challenge of earning those precious road wins. Heading into Missouri’s win at Texas Tech, Big 12 teams were a combined 114-1 at home. A few teams picked up conference road wins last week, but at week’s end the home team was 12-5 in Big 12 games.
Both of Missouri’s games illustrate this point.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
I am back this week, but don’t know why. With it so cold and foggy, I should have stayed home by the fire.
Most folks are only going out when necessary, and busy moving snow, so I don’t have much news again this week.
On Saturday, my son John came out for a short visit. Katie stopped by on Sunday evening and Hailey came by yesterday afternoon to help out a little, and that was my excitement for the week.
Next Friday, January 22, is the Seniors’ luncheon at the First Assembly of God Church. Hope to see you all there!
Our prayers are needed this week for our country, service folks, the homeless, the weather, Paul Boyd and Dorothy Renshaw. Also pray for Lathrop’s police chief - Leonard Eads will be going to the hospital on Friday to have a toe and part of his foot amputated, due to complications from an injury sustained while on the job.
Give someone a smile today, and God bless you all.
Edith


Missouri Tigers Basketball
Guest Columnist to the Rural Reporter,, Benjamin Herrold
Coming out of a TV timeout with 7:46 left in last Saturday’s game with Kansas State, the Missouri Tigers faced a tough situation. The Tigers trailed 53-48 in their Big 12 opener, jeopardizing Missouri’s 29-game home winning streak. Missouri hadn’t scored a point in over four minutes and hadn’t made a field goal in nearly eight minutes. The game was in danger of slipping away.
Then the Mizzou Arena crowd, raucous all day, rose up again. As the Missouri players jogged out onto the court, the crowd began applauding, cheering their team. Louder and louder the applause grew as the fans rose to their feet, section by section. Soon the entire arena was standing and cheering for the Tigers. The Missouri players waved their arms, imploring the crowd to keep up the support down the stretch in this exhausting game. Missouri was going to win.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Once again, our poor dear Edith is just not feeling well. Please keep her in your prayers! Also remember the families of the ones who died in the fire in Braymer - such a sad situation.I’m sure there are others who need to be on the prayer list as well; unfortunately, I don’t have a list of names.


Letter to the Editor
Only My Opinion,
The holiday season is behind us and not yet time for Easter and spring, but possibly a good time to reflect on the past year and think about the future.
I believe if we take time to study the past, our history, it should motivate and encourage us to try and make better decisions for the future.
At Thanksgiving, we enjoyed a full table of delicious food with family and friends, as I am sure many of you did.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Below zero and still a lot of snow, with snow flurries likely today. I am one of the many who is ready for it to stop. If it snows much more, I’ll see you in the spring!
Let us pray for the homeless and hungry in these cold, cold times; also the animals that are out. We need to continue to pray for our country, service men and women and each other.
God bless and happy new year,
Edith


Bits About 'Em
Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to all my friends, family and readers! Some of you I know by voice only, and others I know personally.
I do appreciate each and every one of you, and remember that Jesus is the Reason for the season. I am taking this time to pray that God blesses you according to your needs, both now and throughout the coming year.
Let’s continue to pray for our country and the leaders of our country, our service men and women; also let us pray for the homeless and the hungry this winter!
God bless, and merry Christmas,
Edith
****


Notes from Neverwhen
by Candy Spilman
I love Christmas! I never have as much money as I’d like to spend on gifts, and I’m such a procrastinator that I’m usually left with a three page long to-do list on Christmas Eve, but that’s okay.
There’s just something about this holiday - of course, as the commemoration of God sending His Son to this earth, it is a day well worth a joyous celebration.


Letter to the Editor
Dear Editor,
A part of my daily commute involves listening to radio station 100.1 to get local news.
Every month, this radio station reports on a local city council meeting. I am always impressed by the way this community works together and how respectful members seem toward each other.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Really cold this morning, not for sure what the temperature is, but it is too cold for me!
No Bits this week; everyone is either busy getting ready for Christmas or frozen up!


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Rather cold out there, with more snow headed this way. That I could do without!
What little I have been out, I have not seen much of the Christmas Spirit out there. But it’s no wonder - the merchants aren’t playing Christmas carols and sales people aren’t saying “Merry Christmas”. Most folks acted like they don’t know the reason for the season - that Christ the Savior was born.
Let’s remember Vickie Eads, Hannah Evanson and Caitlin O’Connor in our prayers, our country and service men and women. Also, let’s remember the reason for the season.
God bless,
Edith
Merry Christmas to all!
****


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Nice bright day, with the sun shining.
It is so good to be back again after a 5 day stay in the hospital. However, I am only back a couple of hours a day for a while.
Folks, let’s remember Vicki Eads in prayer, Hannah, Amy Whitlow, our government and service men and women, and each other.
Let’s not forget to pray each day and spend time with God.
God bless,
Edith
****


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
What a nasty, rainy day! Sure wish we had some of that sunshine back again, but at least it isn’t snow - yet.
As many of you know, Edith has again been hospitalized, and is now recovering from surgery. Thanks to the prayers of all her friends and family, she is doing well, and hopefully will soon be back with us at the office.
Please continue to pray for her recovery, and also for Hannah Evanson’s recovery, as well as for our service men and women. There are many soldiers who will be away from their families for the holidays, and they need our prayers.


Letter to the Editor
Dear Editor:
I attended the city council meeting this month. I loved saying the “Pledge of Allegiance” prior, but I was amazed at the rest of the evening. The newspapers had a very accurate sequence of the happenings. I have to say I was amazed.
-The mayor asked the Mo. Betterment Committee to come and talk, but later when the commissioner stated there is potential tax assistance for economic development, the mayor scoffed about no tax benefit.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Cold, wet and some snow - thank God we didn’t get a lot! I heard on the early news last night that parts of Kansas got up to 6”.
I don’t have much news this week. Wishing you all a good Thanksgiving, and remember something that you are thankful for each day until then. We all do have a lot to be thankful for, even if it doesn’t seem like it at times.
Seniors, join us at the First Assembly of God Church at 11:00 a.m. on Friday, Nov. 20 for worship and dinner. Also, Saturday, at 7:00 for a Gospel concert. There are so many events coming up till Christmas to keep us busy...
Remember Hannah in prayer and Vickie Eads, our country, service men and women and each other.


Letters to the Editor
Only My Opinion
Congratulations to the Lathrop Community for honoring a young man who when at a fork in the road of life, choose the path that led him to honor God, country and family, giving his own life to defend those choices and freedoms.
Shame on our elected official in Washington D. C. for protecting the individual rights of minorities and special groups to the point that a radical terrorist is allowed to achieve a high rank in our military; killing or maiming over forty people including an unborn child, inside a large military fort in our own country.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
A little cooler after the light shower last night, but supposed to be warmer as the day progresses.
Hope it is nice for Thanksgiving, which is only 2 weeks away, and I’m really not looking forward to a white Christmas, which is just around the corner. This year has really flown; we’ll be in 2010 before we know it.
In the meantime, let’s keep Hannah Evanson and Vickie Eads in our prayers; also our country and service folks. Be sure to include our neighbors and young people.
God bless,
Edith
Keep smiling - someone needs a smile today and every day!
****


Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor,
I was reading the article about the 116 Hwy Intersection dangers for our students and speaking with my husband decided to share an idea we had.
When we lived in Japan during the Viet Nam War we lived in a neighborhood with the Japanese. We were able to see how the society functioned first hand.
Being a young country, we can learn from our elders in matters such as protecting our young while in transit to school.
In Japan, with unrelenting traffic in a constant stop and go flow, the Japanese have built walking bridges over roads like an arch.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Another beautiful day that the Lord hath made; let us rejoice and be glad in it.
LOVE this weather, don’t you? I believe we will see some that won’t be so nice before long.
Today let’s keep Issac Jackson’s family in prayer, along with Hannah Evanson, Vicki Eads, Sandra Gastineau, our country and our service men and women.
God bless each of you.
Keep smiling,
Edith
P.S. Senior citizens’ dinner at the Assembly of God Church on November 20 at 11:00.
****


Letter to the Editor
In My Opinion
I, like a good portion of the citizens of Lathrop, am not happy with the gravel on our streets. I am wondering if the money from the street bond was spent wisely. Some streets needed repair more then others, some needed no repair. Would it not have been better to, starting with the worse streets, to have dug out the bad spots put down a good base, leveled with asphalt to the existing asphalt then put down a new layer of asphalt? The last time the streets were repaired they were just coated over. There was a soft spot with broken and cracked asphalt in front of my house. That is the same area now that needed repaired. If the base is bad in an area it will not be cured by putting new asphalt over it. We now have dusty gravel roads. If I wanted to contend with dust I would have moved to the country. Also I am wondering how much gravel is going to be on the side of the streets when it comes time to remove snow.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Another good day, was a little cool and brisk this morning, but turned out great.
It is nice to be back. I had lots of calls and prayer from friends ad neighbors. My sister-in-law in Sumner, MO and my niece and nephew from the Ozarks both called, as they had read it in our paper. These calls and prayers help as much as the medicine. Now I am so tired of all this sickness in our community, aren’t you?
You know, Jesus gave us the authority to use His name. So, in the name of Jesus, let’s rebuke the sickness in our community and households and pray for God’s anointed healing to be over all our households and our friends.
Keep Vickie Eads, Hannah Evanson, Sandra Gastineau, each other plus our government and service folks in our daily prayers.


Letter to the Editor
Only My Opinion
Last week I wrote to the editor stating that I questioned several decisions made by our current city administration. In this country, we value the right to our opinion and to be able to express it. Hopefully we can maintain these rights, again remember election time is coming up soon.
If you criticize someone else’s decision I think you should be prepared to offer what you believe would have been a better alternative.
First concerning the drainage on Valley Street. Why did the city not refer the property owners back to the realtor who sold the houses in a flood-plain, the developer who built the houses, the engineer who designed the work for the developer or lastly, the city liability insurance carrier at the time the project was approved by the city? My understanding is that the liability insurance is covering a faulty decision made by a previous city administration over improper procedure in the dismissal of a city employee.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
We had a lovely day yesterday, but the rain is supposed to be coming in later today, and by Thursday, it will be downright chilly again.
This is Candy, filling in for Edith, who is under the weather. After a trip to the emergency room and some medicine, she is recovering, and should be back to the office in a few days.
Keep Edith in prayer, as well as Hannah Evanson, who leaves for the surgeon in New York on Wednesday. Also everyone else who is affected by illness, financial problems, or other crises in their lives.
May God bless all of you,
Edith & Candy


Letters to the Editor
Only My Opinion
One of the most discussed or “cussed” about topics at the coffee shop lately is the condition of our city streets after the latest “street resurfacing” project.
As I remember, the residents of Lathrop approved a tax levy to reasphalt our streets for an amount up to $800,000, to be paid over a period of ten years. When it was assumed the streets would need to be redone again the past improvement would be paid off.
The new administration in City Hall assumed they could spend the $800,000 any way they saw fit as long as it was under the heading of street improvements.
The first allocation of funds for approximately $60,000 plus was to corrrect a drainage problem on Valley Street, created by a previous developer under a previous administration.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Do you suppose the polar bears are heading for our part of the country? It is getting to be their kind of weather - sure not mine!
I suggest that it is time to unpack your BVD’s, comforters and etc.; as it will get even colder.
But one nice thing about the cold - it kills germs, fleas and etc. You know, there is always a little good with the bad, and a little bad with the good. That’s life! But some day, my friend, when we cross over the bridge, it will all be GOOD.
A little October history: President Ike Eisenhower was born October 14, 1890 and President Theodore Roosevelt on October 27, 1858. Daylight Saving Time will end November 1, and then before we know it, 2009 will be gone and we will start 2010.


Letter to the Editor
Dear Editor,
Wow! Last week’s Rural Reporter pretty much expressed most people’s opinion of the “great” job the mayor has accomplished. Can’t really blame the council members - the board is “stacked”.
Pauli, you have a wonderful grasp on writing - please utilize your talent. You have raised a question: Where is the rest of the $300,000? Not that we, the people, will ever know.
At church Sunday, I actually introduced myself to two strangers, and to my blessing and privilege, they were Hannah (Evanson) and her mom. I might be the only person in Lathrop that didn’t know them. However, there are no strangers in the Lord.
Ever since I heard of Hannah and her problems, I have been praying for her miracle.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Beautiful morning - the air so fresh and clean after a shower sometime earlier this morning. Sure would be nice if a little shower could clean up this mess that man has made of this world.
From where I sit, I think it’s time for us to start praying for the leaders of our country, that they would realize that God created this world, and if we put Him and His Word first, we would have no problems, and would live in a land of peace and plenty.
Let’s keep Hannah Evanson in our prayers, and each other.
God bless,
Edith
****
On Friday Mary Ann Barnes, Donita Holman, Carolyn Lovelace, and Deah Donelson attended a Bowers cousin luncheon at the home of their aunt, Beverly Bowers of Gower, MO.


Post Scripts
By Pauli Clariday
Thank you, citizens of Lathrop for caring enough to voice your opinions about the condition of our roads!
I thought something was funny when the bid for work in 2009 was nearly the same price as the road resurfacing bids we paid for in 1998!!
And on top of that, we, the voters passed a bond issue for nearly $300,000 more than what was spent on the roads.


Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor,
I am still confused as to why the city council decided on chip and seal for the entire town. I could conceivably understand it being applied to a few less used roads or roads in disrepair in less traveled areas, but on every road? I do not understand the logic at all. My husband and I belong to a motorcycle group that sponsors charity runs and now we find ourselves advising that this area is not a good area to travel through due to the gravel everywhere. This means less good reviews to attract new people to view the area and the beauty it displays this time of the year as an alternate route other than riding south of the city. After this winter and the roads are more than likely all pot holed and wash boarded, I am sure we will have less to be proud of in Lathrop. I feel sorry about the presumed lost revenue for the merchants because of loss of interest in this town due to the road situation too.
Since I understand from talk about town that we have saved nearly $100,000 or so in doing the road work this way, I would like to know where this money is to be designated?


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Really cool this morning and supposed to be even cooler this weekend. Is winter coming early this year? Wouldn’t surprise me if it did.
I remember in the mid 50’s that we had a blizzard in October. It sleeted, snowed and blew so hard you couldn’t see your hand before your face. It didn’t last too long, but it was a mess while it lasted.
A little October history: The first of October in 1924, Jimmy Carter was born. (I don’t remember that day.) October the 9th, 1888, the Washington Monument was opened to the public, and of course, October 12 says Columbus Day. October 14, 1890 was President Eisenhower’s birthday. More next week!


Missouri Tigers Football
The Missouri Tigers kept rolling along last Friday night, finishing up the nonconference part of the schedule with a 31-21 win over Nevada in Reno.
Yes, that was Friday night in Reno, as opposed to college football’s traditional Saturday games, since Missouri had agreed to play the game on Friday night to get it on ESPN. The reason given for playing on Friday is the increased exposure of playing on a national ESPN broadcast. This often means showing off the program to potential recruits, but almost all possible recruits were battling out their own high school games on Friday night.
The Friday college game is widely watched by college players and coaches, as the coaches wisely keep their players locked in their hotel rooms on the night before games, leaving TV as the primary entertainment option.


Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor,
I am complaining about the streets. This is the worst I have ever seen them. Walnut St. at the corner of Elm was supposed to have been blacktopped, and of course it is not. I was told that the mayor is saving $100,000 by having the streets chip and sealed. I’m wondering what will happen this winter when they grade the streets!
I think what the mayor did with the zoning board was wrong. Some aldermen were blind sided and knew nothing. Two voted no, but of course the mayor made the decision.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
I do believe fall is finally here. Anyway, it sure felt like it this morning - cool and brisk, just the way I like it; and besides, the calendar says fall begins today.
Native American Day is the 25th, and Yom Kippur the 28th. We have all kinds of events in the month of October.
Let’s remember to pray for our country and service men and women; and special prayers for Hannah Evanson and each other.


Letters to the Editor
Dear friends in the community of Lathrop:
I am quite upset, but I’d like to give you a bit of history to explain why I’m so upset.
I was born and raised within this community. I left after graduating from HS here and ended up in a community that longed for the ability to improve their community; but being 70 miles from any major metropolis, it was near impossible. So when I moved back, I had big dreams of seeing Lathrop have the improvements that the other town could only dream of. I joined the Chamber of Commerce. We were told by Tommy Williams, treasurer, that we were near losing our not-for-profit status because they had too much money, so we tried to do some downtown Christmas lights. That caused a rift that destroyed the Chamber of Commerce. The organization voted to take everything and make it the Festival Committee. So without any funds, and not having the support of City Council - and being literally attacked by a member of the FC in a city council meeting, we gave up.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Another beautiful morning - I sure like this kind of weather.
I don’t have much news again this week. Folks are staying at home, I guess.
The only exciting thing I did this week was to go to the softball game last night, and exciting it was! Wow! What a game! What a team! I was especially impressed with our pitcher, naturally, as she is very special to me, but I will leave the details of the game to the experts, as they can go into details and etc. much better than I can.
Seniors, don’t forget the senior’s dinner at the First Assembly of God Church on Friday, September 18th at 11:00.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Pleasant morning and a nice afternoon shower.
Folks, I am sorry, but no Bits About ‘Em this week. With my birthday, the holiday, broken dentures and etc., I just forgot to call last night.
No, it’s not my age. No, sir! Just too much going on at the moment (which was a senior moment, and believe me, they do come around every so often!).
But let’s continue to pray for our country and our service men and women; and, of course, each other.
Take a minute and think of someone that needs a smile or prayer and do it.
God bless,
Edith


Missouri Tigers Football
The Missouri Tigers’ curious rivalry with Illinois was on display last Saturday in St. Louis. The two states share a lengthy border but relatively low levels of animosity. The stadium parking lot tailgating scene before the game was peaceful, even with plenty fans of both teams mixed together. The fans oddly did boo each other’s bands, but, for the most part, I didn’t see the outrageous behavior that is common in college football’s hottest rivalries.
What I did see was the best imaginable start to the season for Missouri, a dominating 37-9 win over the Illini. In addition to being an all-around solid win, the great play of sophomore quarterback Blaine Gabbert has Missouri fans, myself included, positively swooning.
In his first career start, Gabbert followed the tradition of Missouri’s two previous quarterbacks, Brad Smith and Chase Daniel, by wowing fans with a great first game. Gabbert’s stats were great, as he completed 25 of 33 passes for 319 yards and three touchdowns, and he added a rushing touchdown.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Beautiful morning, isn’t it? But before we know it, the snow and cold will be here. I hope we have a mild winter, although I suspect it will be early and rather
harsh. The Farmer’s Almanac is predicting an extremely cold winter, so be prepared.
The last of my tomatoes are about gone - will pull up my vines this weekend, with a few left for fried green tomatoes - yum, yum.
Not much news this week, maybe more later.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Good weather we are having; more like fall instead of late summer. That’s ok - I like it!
It will really be fall before we know it. Then, cold, snow, etc. But that can wait a while, as I feel we will have a really cold winter.
Now that school has started, watch out for kids that are walking to and from school, also the high school drivers.
Our prayer list this week: our country, our service men and women, Israel, and especially our government, and each other.
God bless,
Edith


Post Scripts
By Pauli Clariday
Ahhh... Beyond 2000. Haven’t thought of that for a while. Great idea. Great enthusiasm. Great preaching from the pulpit about community, communication, cooperation.
What went wrong? I don’t know. I have my theory.... or maybe they’re excuses.... but I am not alone in my squelched efforts to make our world--our community-- a little better.
I absolutely salute the people working with the EDCCC and their efforts, and we do have a membership.
But I am not sure what the letter above is asking.


Letter to the Editor
Where was
Lathrop representation?
Dear Editor:
Yooh! Hoo! Is there anyone there? If so where was Lathrop’s representation in Plattsburg last weekend? Maybe no one got the memo.
The Economic Development Council of Clinton County put on a GREAT! Weekend. This was supposed to be for all of Clinton County. I keep asking myself has Lathrop dropped out of the county.
I remember a few years back a group in Lathrop was formed for community betterment called “Beyond 2000”. Out of that day came the realization that our community was growing and we had needs such as better schools, more activities for the youth of our community and to bring businesses to the community so that young and old alike did not have to go so far for things such as work, stores, libraries and many other things. I know I worked hard on the committee that I was on. Then it seamed as the ball was just dropped.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
With 7 to 9” of rain in the last couple of days, we are really wet. Water is standing in my yard knee deep to a tall Indian.
Folks are getting ready for school and etc. I don’t have much news this week.
Fans of Bill Clinton, did you know his birthday is August 19, 1946? Also, it was National Aviation Day.
The Red Cross was established in 1864 on August 22. The women’s suffrage victory took place on August 26, 1920.
Our prayer list this week: our country and its leaders, our service men and women; also Israel, Faye Sellers Sims and each other.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Nice shower and a little cooler - hope it stays cooler for now.
Our prayer list this week: our country and the leader of our country and service men and women; also Nicholas Slibowski, Roy & Louise Sellers, Ron Minter, Jim & Imogene Eames, Mary Ann Barnes, Ron & Jean Jones and Fred & Connie Clanton.


Letters to the Editor

Kind words
for a weary crew....
Dear Pauli, Norma and Edith,
Old Reed Gerber would be so proud of all of you. You and your publication just keep getting better and better. The three of you captured the essence of the 45th Friendship Festival event from Wednesday through Saturday and spun it into a published news paper in only two days...and then..as if you didn’t have anything else to do...at the very last second before publication time...you arranged for a bank robbery just to give the front page that certain, finishing touch.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Nice little shower this morning; maybe now it will cool off a little. About 80 degrees would be just fine.
Not too much news this week - seems like everyone enjoyed the Festival, and now they are getting ready for school. My, hasn’t the time flown this year? If you are like me, you are wondering where it went.
A little August history - On Aug. 4, 1917, the U.S. purchased the Virgin Islands; Herbert Hoover’s birthday was Aug. 10, 1874; V.J. Day was Aug. 14, 1945; and the Panama Canal opened on Aug. 15, 1914.


I"ve Never Seen Anything Like It
I’ll tell you what...the U.S. Military ought to be taking notes on “inter-service cooperation” from the many diverse groups that pulled off the 45th Lathrop Friendship Festival.
From the inside, the cooperation between the leaders of the Lathrop Friendship Festival Corporation, every single department in the City of Lathrop, the Sonshine Carnival owners, the Ameren U.E. Company, Eads Solid Waste, the Lathrop Merchants, the Clinton County Sheriff’s Department, the Lathrop Fire District, and American Legion Post 467 far exceeds, by light years, any event ever, in Lathrop’s past. And best of all...it was so smooth that from the outside you, the fine citizens of Lathrop, didn’t notice the difference.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Supposed to be cooler today - about 80 degrees. Boy, isn’t this weather something else again? But the Bible does say that the seasons will change in the latter days! W-e-l-l!
The Festival is here again, and everyone is looking forward to it. My hat is off to those that work so hard to make it a success.
Today in 1914, World War I is to be remembered.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Cool and wet this morning - feels like fall weather, but we had a beautiful weekend. Wonder what is coming up next?
I had a wonderful weekend with my grandson and his new bride, as they celebrated the wedding with a beautiful reception at Smithville Lake, along with about 60 others attending.
Our prayer list this week:


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
A wet one it is. It sure rained hard for 30 to 45 minutes this morning. I wonder, did we have 7 lean years (drought) and now starting on 7 fat years (rain)? You know, like in Pharaoh’s dream; the one that Joseph interpreted in Genesis 41. We don’t need fortune tellers to tell us our future - just read Genesis through Revelation!


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Beautiful morning - in fact, going to be a beautiful day, but supposed to turn real hot next week. I hope it isn’t real hot during our festival, but you know MO - the weather changes every time the moon does.
My tomatoes are growing big time. Ed Shrewsbury was in and wanted to know if we had a big corn knife or jungle knife to cut his tomatoes off of the vine. But, you know Ed! And I am from MO.
Some history facts for the month of July: Cellular phones were made commercially available on July 12, 1982; the first transatlantic jet crossing was July 14, 1948; the first atomic bomb was detonated July 16, 1945; also July 20, 1969, man landed on the moon; July 23, 1904, the ice cream cone was invented; the CIA was created on July 25, 1947. Then the important day of my life, July 26, 1947, my first child, a son, was born. Years earlier on July 28, 1914 was World War I.


Letter to the Editor
Dear Editor,
The death of Doc Allen closed an interesting and important chapter in the history of Lathrop and the community.
Dr. Harold W. Allen was nothing less than a marvel when he decided to set up his dental practice in Lathrop. I can still recall the excitement when this young, handsome, outgoing professional, and most eligible bachelor came to town. Some predicted that he wouldn’t last long in Lathrop, but little did they know.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Nice and cool this morning - about 78 degrees. I didn’t hear the weather report, but I do know we ain’t in for a snow storm!
A little history for the month of July: July 1, 1917 - MO income tax took effect at a rate of 1/2 of 1%. Wow, times sure have changed.
On July 3, 1919, Legislature ratified an amendment to the US Constitution allowing women to vote. We’ve come a long way, Baby!


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Sure is nice and hot - quite a change since last week. We sure need this sun, but not so much of it!
From what I hear, the Antique Show was great; got rained out Saturday night, some.


Bits About 'Em
by Edith Webb
Good morning,
Rain, rain, go away, come again next month - we need to dry out!
Our crop lands need some sunshine and with all the floods and et cetera, we may be short on the food supply this year. So, as the Indians used to dance for rain, let us pray for it to stop for a while, and heal our land.
My tomatoes are doing great, if we get some sunshine this week, they will really go to town.
Not too much news this week.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Another beautiful day, here at least, but let’s continue to pray for our country and service men and women and the storm victims. Also Ron Minter, Wilma Griffin, Jean Jones, Harold Spangler, Donita Holman, Carrol Hash, Roy & Louise Sellers, Allen Pendleton, Josephine Crismon, Vicki Eads, John Diibon, Connie Clanton and each other.
Some more history facts for the month of June:


Be Our Guest
Dear Readers:
Area newspapers were again submitted a written list of questions from the Citizens Oversight Committee of Clinton County by Mylissa Stutesman. Along with the questions and a courteous thank you for a quick reply, was a chastisement for the paper “leaking” the questions prior to the publication.
What puzzles me, is that if this were a genuine inquiry for answers to questions--and not simply a means to create suspicion and doubt--then providing answers to questions in the same public forum in which the questions were asked, we should have been thanked as well.
The Rural Reporter has been more than fair in providing and allowing space for the scrutiny of public bodies. Practices and ethics of elected boards of officials and the use of public funds are open to judgement and criticism by the publics they serve.
We, however, feel that when a newspaper is being used and abused beyond the best interest of the public, we have every right to act in our own best judgement and make decisions for the product and publication for which we are responsible.
Below is the response to Ms. Stutesman. As stated, if there are other members of the public that wish to bring to light other issues, we are open to consider publication.
Norma Ward has been attending the PWSD#4 meetings, and I trust her integrity, accuracy, and fairness in reporting. PWSD#4 meetings are held the first Thursday of each month, and are open to the public. The board began their meetings with the auditor this Tuesday evening. I am of the opinion that we should leave the conviction of wrong-doing by volunteers to the scrutiny of experts.


Mylissa-
Thank you for your email. We appreciate your concern for the citizens of the PWSD#4, and we encourage the newspaper to be used as a forum between the public and public officials.
However, it is unclear whether this exchange of questions and answers is for the benefit of the PWSD#4 users as a general population, or of the oversight committee. As a newspaper, we must consider that our job is to benefit and inform the general population of readership. As we have generously committed a large amount of time, space, and effort to provide your organization with a medium to express your concerns, the same distress has not been voiced, relayed, or expressed from any other individuals outside your organization.
The publisher and editor of the Rural Reporter believes firmly in the accountability of public officials and public dollars. We will await the results of the state audit demanded by your organization, and report accordingly.
Until that time, unless any new developments take place, we will consider this dialogue closed, and will no longer participate in this antagonistic exchange.

Respectfully,
Pauli Clariday
Publisher, Rural Reporter


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
What a beautiful morning, nice light breeze, sun shining. Isn’t God good? It is supposed to rain later today. My tomatoes can use the rain. They are looking good - will have some big ones unless Peggy sprinkles shrink dust on them. She wouldn’t do that, would she? Let’s just wait and see, as I am told all is fair in love and war.


Be Our Guest
The Rural Reporter received the following questions from Mylissa Stutesman, Press Correspondent, COCCC; addressing concerns about a variety of policies, procedures, and actions by the Public Water Supply District No. 4. In order to address these concerns in the public media, the Rural Reporter initiated contact and invited any member of PWSD #4 to respond. Board Member Jerry Streeter, elected in April 2009 responded. Ms. Stutesman and Mr. Streeter’s questions and replies are printed below.
Dear Mrs. Stutesman and members of the COCCC,
I have read your letter and I do wish to comment on every issue. To make it easy, I will provide a paragraph and supply a follow-up statement. These statements should answer most, if not all, questions.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Rather cool this morning, and some rain - what a change from Saturday!
I don’t have much news this week; will catch up next week.
Excuse me if I sound like an old grump, but everyone wants a nice looking town, right? Well, with the grass growing like crazy, it is mowed and thrown into some streets, which makes Lathrop look real trashy, and besides, it sticks to your cars. Please keep your grass in your own yards, and be a town to be proud of!


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Going to be a heat wave today - in the 80’s, so I hear. Well, it’s about time, as I am tired of rain and cold weather.
I would like to take this opportunity to tell lour High School graduates and High School kids this: The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you. Taxes can take your money, rent groceries, etc., but learning is one thing that is yours to keep. Congrats, kids!


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Wasn’t the weekend nice? Everyone enjoyed the fine weather, with dinner out or BBQ at home, and et cetera. Let’s pray that this weekend will be as nice, for graduation, as lots of folks are preparing for that with all kinds of picnics, BBQ’s, parties and et cetera. Then next will be Memorial Day, Father’s Day, and then 4th of July. Before you know it, another year has flown by.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Plenty of sunshine and nice and warm - doesn’t it feel great? As a matter of fact, it is perfect, and could stay that way forever!
I don’t have much news again this week. I guess folks are getting ready for Mother’s Day and Graduation.
Remember, you still have time to congratulate the guy or gal of your choice for $16.00 - just call me.


Letter to the Editor
Dear Editor,
I read last week that Lathrop’s new mayor, Jim Crenshaw, at the first meeting with three NEW council members, decided to take the control of the police department away from the city administrator and give it to a new council member.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
What a rain, but we sure don’t need any more for a while. The news said more is coming. However, we got sunshine today, and it sure looks good.
So let us remember, “This is the day the Lord hath made” - Rejoice and do something with it!
Our prayer list this week:


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
A little cool today, but will warm up the rest of the week. Mushrooms should be up somewhere - hope I get some this year! The kids’ dad always brings me a mess.


BIts About 'Em
Good morning,
Sun shining so nice and bright - it brings out the sunglasses! Here it is warmer - let’s pray it continues for about a week, at least.


Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor:
I am writing this letter in response to Ms. Eads letter published in this week’s paper.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning!
Sun shining, but too cold - me and ninety nine thousand others are wondering if it will ever get warm.
I talked to my sister-in-law in California last night, and she said it was hot out there. Think I will take a little vacation and go see her, maybe I can get warm for a while.


Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor,
I am writing you this letter because I just got done voting.


BIts About 'Em
by Edith Webb
Good Morning!
Not much news again this week. Weather too bad over the weekend for much to be going on.
I know I just played like an old bear and hibernated over the weekend. Didn't poke my nose out till Monday morning, and I am still growling.


Bits About 'Em
by Edith Webb
Good morning,
Nice little shower, with lots of wind last night - it kind of looks like it has set in for all day. We need more rain, as folks are getting ready to plant gardens this year, to help out on the grocery bill.


Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor:
I was reading thru the paper this week and was really disappointed.


Bits About 'Em
by Edith Webb
Good morning,
Nice and warm, sun shining, birds singing, and folks are happy. Spring has finally sprung, and we will be hunting mushrooms, making gardens, wearing our Easter bonnets, and before we know it, another year will be gone.
So let's make the best of this one - keep smiling, looking up and doing something nice for someone each day.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Lot of much needed rain, but now is the time to sing “Rain, rain go away, come again another day, and be sure to bring some nice warm sunshine, because we all want to play”!


Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor:
My son has special needs and he is the 4th grade at Lathrop School. He was so proud and excited that he was going to be playing his recorder in the program at school.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Supposed to be sunny, with a high of 40 degrees today. Well, here at 9:00, it is cloudy and about 30 degrees or under - I'll be glad when spring finally gets here.


Bits About 'Em
by Edith Webb
Good morning,
Nice sunny day, just a little cool. Not sure what is coming up, as I didn't hear the report this morning or last night.


Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor,
I was very happy to read in the Rural Reporter that the local PTO has scheduled a night off, so that families can stay home and spend quality time together. I think this is a wonderful thing to do, and I agree very much.


Bits About 'Em
by Edith Webb
Good morning,
Supposed to get up to 53 today, but here at 9:30, it is still pretty cool. But then again, spring will be here in 4 big weeks. Will be hard to wait, but guess we can do it.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Another beautiful day, the Lord hath made, let us rejoice and be glad in it.


Funeral of a Hero
Funeral of a Hero
By Peggy Stokes, Lathrop, MO
I came home Saturday from an interesting and sad day. I don't know if you have heard of the misguided religious zealots of the Westboro Baptist Church that are protesting at military funerals or not but this group is just ridiculous. The call went out for a funeral Saturday of a 30 yr old soldier who recently was killed in Iraq in a helicopter crash. Today (Saturday) 450+ bikers of several groups and associations showed up to shield the family and loved ones and to pay respects to CWO Kelly. In 2005 The Combat Veterans Motorcycle Association (CVMA) made the first ride. The CVMA invited anyone who wanted to ride to come along. We were 20 in number. The American Legion later came up with the idea of the Patriot Guard Riders. The list also included The Blue Knights Motorcycle Club, the Wind and Fire MC, The Brothers Word MC, The Viet Nam Veterans MC, The 2nd Brigade MC, The Hog Riders and no doubt others. I witnessed many others in vans and cars in uniforms of all types. I saw Representative Guest and his assistants. I heard the bagpipes playing inspiring music and I saw the people of Cameron who had come to see that the family was not bothered or disregarded for the WBC’s political purposes.
Chief Warrant Officer Matthew G. Kelley, our newest hero, who gave his life to protect our country and allow us to enjoy our freedoms, has been taken from his family and friends. The bikers and all the others were determined that no disrespect would occur on their watch. Members of these groups gathered from all over the state to make sure the WBC Group did not disrespect our hero’s family. Not here, not in our backyard. To make sure, the word was put out and they all responded. The roar of their love and support shook the downtown area of Cameron. The merchants came outside of their businesses to watch the crowds. Everywhere it seemed in Cameron there were people in uniform or Group Logos, cars and vans full of people like retired Veterans, politicians, police, fire fighters (on and off duty) and family and friends. All these people were there to support the family and to make sure the WBC Group did not get the media opportunity they so selfishly and shamefully came for.
While the biker groups were staking a line of “protection” around the church for the services, word got to our group, the CVMA that WBC Group was down the street starting trouble as expected. The CVMA group moved pretty fast and it seems strange but people actually cheered once they moved out in front of the crowd on one side of the street to assure, without words that they were there to help. They lined up to face the citizens who were angered by the WBC Group chanting and posters. They lined up so the logos on their backs were clearly stated that they were Veterans of Combat and to show disrespect by turning their backs to the WBC Group. They intended not to hurt anyone but to make sure there was no fallout on the funeral or the family. After a couple of shout outs back and forth between the clearly irritated crowd and WBC Group, with police ready for just about anything to happen and firefighters in ready to release water from hoses, the WBC Group suddenly left followed by a large mass of angry people down the street. The bikers went back to the parking area and 450+ bikes came to life with a roar no one will soon forget. The line of bikes then departed for the cemetery in the country for our fallen hero.
The 7 mile ride through town and through the country was inspiring. Most people in town were there along the road. The roar of all those bikes leaving for the cemetery and the show of the crowds waving small flags at us and cheering was something to behold. At the cemetery it was a good 1/2 - 3/4 mile of Veterans and bikers from all the above mentioned groups. Each one with a large American Flag on a pole, stood practically shoulder to shoulder on either side of the road. As the procession passed down that dusty country road they all stood at attention. Once they were all at the gravesite, the whole group single filed in the middle of the dusty road and marched to make a circle of flags around the family to embrace the family one last time with the grateful citizens and veterans who do care. It was in the country, there were 450+ motorcycles sparkling in the sunlight parked in a horse field. It was not captured by the media; at least I didn't see them. No one saw it on the news that I know of but it was one of the most touching moments to see so many people in this small town pulling together. Kids and parents waving flags at us as motorcycle after motorcycle roared through the countryside on gravel, which they don't generally do, to and from the little cemetery and people in the procession crying at the site of so many who cared. There were probably close to 500 flags waving perfectly in the soft breezes on that dusty country road under soft blue skies. Two large Chinook helicopters made a powerful and respectful flyover.
In my life there have been few more poignant moments that just about take your breath away at how wonderful we all can be when we all come together. It was inspiring by the sheer beauty of the atmosphere, the collective thought, and the love, sorrow and gratitude that was so eloquently and silently proclaimed by so many faces.
In my adventures through my life this was something I will put down in my journal as a moment I was proud of my fellow man, my country and especially for those who serve it. Some call them the salt of the earth; I call them all my heroes. Thank you CWO Matthew G. Kelley and family for reminding me again how lucky I am to live in the U.S.




Letter to the Editor
Dear Editor,


Hero
    "Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends." John 15:13
    


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Warmer days are ahead, even if the groundhog did see his shadow.


Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor,
The Federal Government has talked about the Country being in debt trillion of dollars. Our state of Missouri informs us that the proposed budget for Missouri is 340 million dollars in the red.


Notes from Neverwhen
by Candy Spilman
Many of you know that I'm a student in my old age - I'm taking online classes to learn web design. The funny thing is, the farther along I get in school, the more lost I feel in the cyber world.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Fine weather for polar bears and Eskimos, but I am neither one!


Notes from Neverwhen
by Candy Spilman
I have previously introduced you all to Rosemary, who is one of my best friends; now this week, I thought I'd talk about another kind of best friend.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Little snow this morning, with a high of 38 degrees, but the sun is shining.


Notes from Neverwhen
by Candy Spilman
I had a funny experience the other day.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
4 degrees above zero and supposed to get colder, so I hear.


Notes from Neverwhen
by Candy Spilman
My friend Rosemary had it right. She once said something to the effect of, "Why do they call them hot flashes, when they're really more like a way of life?"


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Little warmer today, and the rest of the week.


Notes from Neverwhen
by Candy Spilman
I have always had bad luck with cars.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
A little cool this morning, but supposed to reach 50 degrees by afternoon; was 60 degrees yesterday - then it will turn a little colder again.


Notes from Neverwhen
by Candy Spilman
Wow, another new year. A time of new beginnings and resolutions. We're all going to get skinny, manage our money, give up our vices, work harder, get organized, et cetera, et cetera.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,


Notes from Neverwhen
by Candy Spilman
Well, Christmas has arrived, and once again, I finished my preparations at the proverbial eleventh hour.


Cut to the Chase
by Denny Banister
Christmas is not just for those in the city where stores are abundant and bright lights shine pretty.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,


Post Comments
by Pauli Clariday
Same Bat Time.... Same Bat Channel....


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
Supposed to get colder and snow today or tonight. I hope not. No one I know is ready for snow, but that is the reward for living without the fear of earthquakes and etc.


Notes from Neverwhen
By Candy McNab-Spilman
Snow has got to be one of the most unique and magical features of nature. Besides the amazing fact that no two snowflakes are identical, and the fact that snow simply can't be created by human beings, what other element gets as much attention - especially attention that ranges from dread to excitement and joy?


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,


Notes from Neverwhen
I'm excited - I'm meeting my friend Rosemary on Friday.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,


Notes from Neverwhen
by Candy McNab-Spilman
As some of you who are gathered around my kitchen table may have noticed, I have been following the story of Mackintyre McDill-Garton, and the ongoing legacy that he passed along to his family members.


Letters to the Editor
Lathrop Middle School students have responded to a writing prompt about how to make Lathrop better.


Notes from Neverwhen
by Candy McNab-Spilman
Well, it's been a while since we've sat here at my kitchen table!


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,


A Letter to Lathrop
I am writing this letter to the community of Lathrop.


Statement regarding the Oversight Committee
"The committee will act as a liaison between district customers and the water district.


Guest Editorial
I am writing this article in regards to the last Public Water District #4 meeting.


Conservation Comments by Guest Columnist Tammy Pierson, Ray County Conservaton Agent
Those of us that live in the country could clearly hear the tale-tell sounds of the oncoming deer season this past weekend.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning:


Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor:
Details are still sketchy at press time regarding the apparent beating of a Lathrop High School senior following a Halloween party last Friday night, October 24th, in rural Lathrop.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,
This is the day the Lord hath made, let us rejoice and be glad in it.


From the Superintendent's Desk
At the time of writing this article, the election results are not known.


Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor,


Bits About 'Em
News about some of the people in our area by Edith Webb


Bits About 'Em
Good morning!
If you are not ready for winter yet, I suggest you get started. It will be colder this afternoon, and possibly snow on Thurday.


Bits About 'Em
Good morning,


Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor,


Bits About 'Em
Good morning-


Lathrop's Swimming Pool Saga Continues
This article is in response to the Clinton County Leader, Sept. 25th article, “Lathrop’s Swimless Summer.”


Letter to the Editor
Letters to the Editor policy: The Rural Reporter welcomes letters of up to 250 words. The editor reserves the right to reject letters or edit for clarity, brevity, good taste and accuracy, and to prevent libel. No poetry, attacks on private individuals, or letter-writing campaigns, please. Due to the volume of mail and space constraints, writers are asked to limit submissions to one letter every quarter. Include a phone number where you can be reached during the day. For mailed or fax submissions, you must sign the letter.


Notes From Neverwhen
Anyone who knows me can verify the fact that things in my life are often chaotic. Simple tasks develop complications and challenges. The nice thing about that is that I have lengthy, somewhat amusing stories to share with my friends at my kitchen table.


Bits About Em
Good morning!


Bits About Em
Good morning,
72 degrees with a high of 83 today.


Notes from Neverwhen
When I was working as a janitor, I often wished I had an easier job. Cleaning is hard work - I'm sure most of you would agree with me on that. And when you're cleaning a three-story building, that's a lot of stairs to climb, trash cans to empty, toilets to bend over and scrub, and it adds up to miles of vacuuming and mopping. Don't get me wrong - I was always grateful for the job, and I loved the people (although since I usually came in late at night, I seldom actually saw them). But I was always tired and achy. Sometimes even a little beyond achy. After all, I'm hardly a spring chicken any more.


Bits About Em
Good morning,
Beautiful morning, sun so bright it hurts my eyes. With the highs in the 70's and the rest of the week around 80 degrees let's rejoice and be glad of it.
With so much rain, the lawns are becoming like hay fields. With the grass being thrown in the streets, it is just like driving your clean car in a hay field down in the sticks somewhere. If folks would learn how to mow their lawns and keep the grass in their yards, we could be known as a nice clean friendly town, and we could enjoy the nice asphalt streets that cost so much.
On our prayer list this week is: Nancy Mayfield, Linda Christopherson, Dorothy Fugett, Mae Rockford, Nicholas Slibowski, our country and our service men and women - also for Israel.
God Bless,
Edith
****
Derek Fly has completed his 4 years of active service duty and is home, and catching up on visiting friends and family, and sleeping late.
****
Merle and Millie Green and Ron, Paula, Garett and Madison all enjoyed dinner Friday in Liberty, celebrating Garett and Madison's birthdays.
Happy birthday, Garett and Madison.
****
Merle and Millie Green and Mr. and Mrs. Adam Maag and Rita Cundiff Green all enjoyed supper together in St. Joseph Wednesday night.
****
Carolyn Lovelace attended the General Federation of Women's Clubs MVR Conference in Minot, North Dakota from Wednesday through Sunday. She enjoyed the trip very much.
****
Charles and Cheryl Ingraham spent last week touring eastern Missouri and visiting antique shops.
****
Kymeron Joan Stokes made her appearance September 11, 2008 at 4:30 p.m. Big brother of 3 years old was happy to welcome his little sister.
Kymeron is the great niece of Jim and Peggy Stokes.
****
Ruby Burns spent last week visiting son Todd and family in Rolla, MO. While there, she enjoyed playing games with the children, and had a wonderful trip.


Letters to the Editor
SUPPORT YOUR
LOCAL FOOD PANTRY
The food pantries of our communities serve an essential and humanitarian service in providing food products to those who are in need in our communities. Some of the food pantries depend upon charitable donations from individuals and businesses in their area. As the food prices increase due to higher energy prices there is more demand for food assistance. We, in the General Assembly, passed legislation two years ago to give a tax credit to individuals and businesses who donate food products or cash to a qualified food pantry. A food pantry is defined as an organization that is exempt under Section 501(c)3 and distributes emergency food supplies to low-income people. Despite news releases on this tax credit, many people are not aware of this legislation.
Contact your local food pantry about how you can help them and get a tax credit at the same time. The necessary forms can be viewed and downloaded at www.dor.mo.gov/tax/taxcredit/fpt.htm. The forms can also be obtained at my district office. There is a tax credit limit of $2500 per taxpayer per year and a statewide limit of $2 million per year. The taxpayer may take a credit of 50% of their donations.
State representative
JIM GUEST

Dear Editor:
The recent Democratic primary for Clinton County Sheriff was a hard-fought race won by incumbant Sheriff Porter Hensen. A few days before the election, Sheriff Hensen took time to travel to a parole hearing in central Missouri to oppose the release of inmate Fred Silva. Mr. Silva was a violent offender, sentenced to prison for shooting a fine lady in the back of her head as she knelt in her living room in Holt. Mr. Silva should not be paroled, and he was not paroled.
Sheriff Hensen deserves praise for putting his job as sheriff ahead of his political campaigning. The people of Clinton County chose their sheriff well.
Very truly yours,
W. Mitchell Elliott

Letters to the Editor policy: The Rural Reporter welcomes letters of up to 250 words. The editor reserves the right to reject letters or edit for clarity, brevity, good taste and accuracy, and to prevent libel. No poetry, attacks on private individuals, or letter-writing campaigns, please. Due to the volume of mail and space constraints, writers are asked to limit submissions to one letter every two weeks. Include a phone number where you can be reached during the day. For mailed or fax submissions, you must sign the letter.


Notes From Neverwhen
I had a wonderful experience this past Sunday. My son Beau, who is an associate pastor in Monmouth, Illinois, preached at my church in Polo. Beau and his wife Carrie welcomed a second little girl into their family in June, and had therefore made a trip to this area in order to show the new arrival off to family members who had not managed to make the trip northward to meet little Moriah. My pastor, Brother Gale Spilman, had previously told me that he would love for Beau to be a guest speaker any time he was in the area on a Sunday, so we were all delighted that it worked out.
Beau loves the Lord, and is a good preacher. And I'm not just saying that because I'm his mom. (Although, since I'm his mom, I can say that he looks so cute while he's preaching, but I won't go there right now...)
After the service, Brother Gale asked him to stand by the door, to shake hands with the congregation as they exited, which was expected in a Baptist church. What I didn't expect was me being asked to stand next to him. Wow. I have to admit, that was a proud mom moment.
I'm proud of all my kids, of course, but those of you who know me are aware that there have been many issues with some of them. Several of them have been incarcerated. Some of them struggle with addictions. A few of them didn't finish school. While I myself can find admirable traits in the kids who are in the process of overcoming these challenges, the fact is, it's been a while since I have been recognized as the mother of a kid who did a good thing.
My fellow church members hugged me, offering comments such as "You must be so proud". Roger, my fiance, told me that he was proud of me, for having raised such a Godly son.
Me? Yes, of course I was proud. Any mom would have been. But I felt something else, too - quite the opposite. I felt humbled. I remember feeling this way last summer, when attending a women's Bible study at which my daughter Michelle was the speaker.
The fact is, I can't take any credit for my kids' successes and goodness. I was an extremely imperfect parent, and made many, many mistakes, some of them quite serious. Yet, somehow God took over. He held each one of my kids in the palm of His hand, and the ones who were serious about serving Him, He nurtured and strengthened. He molded them into the men and women He created them to be. So what reason do I have to be proud?
The reason I feel humbled stems from my acknowledgement that I am so unworthy of His blessings. Yet, for some reason, He has chosen not only to bless me with all my kids, but also to raise some of them up to special service to Him. Because of His grace, I appear to be a better mom; a better person than I ever actually was. And that's humbling to me.
But since God gave me the blessing, I will gladly take it and rejoice. And yes, I am so proud.


Notes of Whatever
For those of you who may not know, Pauli Clariday (above article) is my daughter, publisher of the Rural Reporter and a EB 1983 Alumni. She wrote the above article this week, and I thought some of you may enjoy her reminiscent’s of her younger days.
Boy, I miss that garden and all the wonderful produce that came with it, don’t miss the mother-daughter spats and arguments, but really miss that garden.
Actually, given time to think about those days, I miss the farm. Never was a town girl, and still like to know who’s driving pass my house, who’s walking pass and who’s kids are in my yard. Back then if a car came down the road, we’d know who it was and pretty much what they wanted, now days, your guess is as good as mine.
I have a little garden, on the north side of my house in Lathrop, a couple of tomato plants, green bell peppers, and yes a zucchini plant, only one! Fresh spinach and leaf lettuce and I’d love to have a row of green beans. Maybe next year.
Another summer has past, and it does go by faster each year, just like my mom told me when I wished my life away at 13, wishing I was 16 or 21. Yet, the EB athletic teams keep me on schedule... Football, Softball & Volleyball, means fall has arrived and I can do what I have come to love, covering sports with a camera, celebrating the triumphs, skills and abilities of these young athletes.
Homecoming is fast approaching, as I sit here at the computer, it’s only 9 days away. Since I’ve become acquainted with most of these candidates, I’m excited to see the girls in their beautiful gowns, glowing faces and pray I get the most beautiful shot of the queen & king possible, celebrating their moment of accomplishment. Before and after the coronation I’m also eager to get the best pictures of the football team, giving them a pictorial memory of their moments of glory.
This makes me happy!


Bits About Em
By Edith Webb
Good morning,
41 degrees this morning, wow! Fall is early this year, before the week is out, the frost might be on the pumpkins.
I still like the weather here better than anywhere else, unless it is on the moon, which I myself don't think we have any business on.
Every time we send up a spaceship, our weather gets all messed up, but so is everything else. So let us continue to pray for our country and service folks, and the upcoming elections, also Nicholas Slibowski, Linda Christopherson, Dorothy Fugett, Mae Rockford and our neighbors.
God Bless,
Edith
****
Susan Pryor was a houseguest of her niece, Brenda Adkisson, over the Labor Day weekend. Susan also visited with her brother, Art Adkisson, & his wife, Dianne. Joining them for the festivities at the Nauvoo, Illinois Grape Festival were Lance Adkisson, Abby & Brady, of La Harpe, Illinois. A yearly treat is the departure of the vehicles from the car show. This year, there were 509 vehicles registered.
****
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Holman were Labor Day Weekend guests of Mrs. Ethel Holman of Louisiana, MO.  On Sunday afternoon they attended the Elliott family reunion at Sunset Park in Louisiana, MO.  On Sunday evening, they traveled to Branson, MO.  While there, they attended the Gospel Music Picnic at Silver Dollar City, the John Tweed Show, and the Jim Owen Show.
****
Cheryl Carpenter celebrated her birthday Saturday night, joined by 12 of her friends, playing cards with sister Marilyn Francis winning with highest score. After the game, everyone enjoyed a delicious birthday cake made by hubby John, and all sang Happy Birthday.
Happy birthday, Cheryl.
****
Carrol Clingan spent Monday in Kentucky visiting with his 10-month-old great grandson. He drove in a lot of rain, but had a nice visit.
****
Jim & Barbara Gerber spent a week visiting Post Clinton in Ohio, near Lake Erie.
While there, they rode the ferry, and went sight-seeing. On the way back, they stopped to visit Barbara's sister just south of St. Louis, also went to see a Cardinals baseball game.
They really had a great trip.
****
Merle & Millie Green attended the wedding of their grandson, Jason Heterington to Stephanie Hyleton on Saturday afternoon at the Christian Church on the Plaza.
Ron & Paula Bullock also attended.
****
Labor Day visitors of Roger & DeAnn Pritchett were Jim & Stephanie Pritchett and family, Rolla; Patrick & Carrie Pritchett & family, Liberty; Matthew & Tori Pritchett & family; and Frances Curl. Eight of the nine grandchildren spent the week-end enjoying being together and six of them also spent the night together. Although little Chloe was too young to participate with the other cousins, she was certainly included, as each one was able to hold her.


Notes From Neverwhen
Hi there, and welcome to my kitchen table! Some of you have shared coffee with me before, but I am a new face to some of the rest of you. Either way, let me catch you up on the latest in my life, and introduce myself to those of you who don't know me.
My name is Candy McNab, although the last name will be changing soon, as I am engaged to be married. Several years ago, I was the editor of the Polo edition of the Rural Reporter, and enjoyed writing my weekly column, where I shared both funny and poignant moments of my life with those who sat around my table with me. And now I'm back! I am going to be working part time on the Lathrop edition, and will once again open my kitchen table to those readers who would like to share in my sometimes thoughtful, sometimes eccentric ramblings.
During my little break from journalism, I worked as a janitor in Caldwell County, and also began taking online classes to obtain a diploma in web design. I am still taking the classes, and had actually planned to stop working and just concentrate on school. Then I got a phone call from Norma, offering me this job, and, well - how could I pass that up?
God has brought me through some heartwrenching events since we last sat together at my table; namely the loss of my oldest son, back in May of 2007, and my mom's death this past June. I have also experienced many blessings, such as several new grandbabies (and another one due in April!), and a relationship with a pretty teriffic man.
I have nine remaining kids, most of which are grown, and upon my marriage, will be acquiring a 17-year-old daughter as well. The grandchild count is up to 16 - with #17 on the way. My house in Polo is also the home for six dogs and several cats.
Oh, and I don't always look the way I do in this picture, with the braids and the tan - I have just returned from a trip to Cancun, Mexico, which is an awesomely beautiful place. I remembered to take the Rural Reporter along, as you may notice on page 7!
Some of my favorite things to do are reading, writing, puzzles, playing on the computer, crafts, and shopping - and of course, spending time here at my kitchen table with my readers. So grab a cup of coffee, sit down, and let's get to know each other!
Note: If you have news for the paper, I can either be reached through the office, or else by my own e-mail address: queenofneverwhen@yahoo.com, or my cell phone: 816.729.8634.


Post Comments
Green beans...
and new perspectives

By Pauli Clariday
Did I ever tell you my story about green beans? It is a story about hate, hardheadedness, and principles.
When I was a kid, we had a huge.... I mean huge garden. My dad planted everything from potatoes to okra to kohlrabi. (Who's ever heard of kohlrabi, anyway?)
Seriously, it was about an acre in size, and we would let the chickens in the garden to eat the grasshoppers.
We grew an abundance of zucchini. You know what I'm talking about--so many that my mom finally found a recipe to cook the flower blooms so it would quit producing the dang things!
We had leaf lettuce and greens throughout the spring... so many I wonder how I got this far without arteriosclerosis from all the bacon fat drizzled over for wilted lettuce salad.... And early on, we had at least four varieties of radishes.... enough to burn your throat after washing them off in the hose and eating them after you pulled them.
We had enough rows of corn to keep an agitated teenager busy. Hoeing became a rebellious art when you could "accidentally" chop down every third plant. I mean, the root systems are so shallow, who could help it?
And we tried and tried with the broccoli and cauliflower and watermelon, but we just didn't have good luck.
But the one thing... the one thing... that seemed to flourish... was green beans.
Nasty, sticky, hidden, sun-beatin-down, not-all-of-them-ready-so-you-have-to-go-back green beans.
For years, I enjoyed those green beans. Cooked with new potatoes, fresh onions, and ham hocks or bacon. Mom would cook them for hours in a pot that was big enough for a soup kitchen. At least two meals a week throughout the winters, I devoured those green beans with a fervor.
The next spring rolled around, and I was in my full teenager rebellious glory. "Farm work" was beneath me.... and besides, I didn't get what I wanted... when I wanted.
"I'm not picking any green beans," I said in my indignant pride and selfishness. I had contributed enough to this family... by my very presence! Didn't they see that by my mere existence that their life was better? Couldn't they value my talent? My skills? My cuteness?
"You eat the green beans. You're going to pick the green beans."
"No, I'm NOT!"
"Very well, then," mom said. "You don't eat any green beans then."
Well! That was easy enough!
The summer of 1979 came and went. It was hot, and I enjoyed the summer at the lake... hanging out with my friends... and avoiding the garden.
I showed them! They can't do it without ME!!!!
That summer, mom canned a record 150 quarts of green beans. And that winter, I self-righteously passed every pot of green beans that came my way.
I won the battle. Oh yeah. I had my fun in the sun, while everyone else picked green beans.
But, gawd, what I wouldn't give for them today.
Life with a garden wasn't so bad. Killing and cleaning chickens has its rewards. Being forced to contribute and carry your weight taught me some very valuable lessons in life.
We may not always feel like we're getting our due respect. But when people really love you... when they really care about you... Well, I think Mick Jagger said it best...
You get what you need.


Bits About Em


Leading Off...


Letter to the Editor: PWSD #4 customer is ready for the audit to begin...


Bits About Em


Letter to the Editor: A long over-due thank you from a PWSD #4 customer


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keeps her finger on the pulse of the community...


Letter to the Editor: Thank God for Kittens, Puppies, Babies and Whistleblowers?


Conservation Comments
From Mitch Hoover, Clinton County MDC Agent


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keeps her finger on the pulse of the community...


Letter to the Editor: Clinton County Sheriff's Clerk speaks out


From the City Administrator
From Don Moore, Lathrop City Administrator


From the Desk of the Superintendent
From Dr. Chris Blackburn, Lathrop School District Superintendent


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keeps her finger on the pulse of the community...


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keeps her finger on the pulse of the Lathrop Community....


Leading Off...
Brett Adkison sounds off on the Madden Curse, EA Sports' decision to put Favre on the cover and Favre's pending choice to return to the NFL.


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keeps her finger on the pulse of the community...


Leading Off...
Brett Adkison talks about the Antique Show, Blowups and meltdowns and the Chiefs' inability to produce a quarterback.


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keeps her finger on the pulse of the community...


Leading Off...
Brett Adkison sounds off about Big Brown, the quarterback situation for the Brigade and the Chiefs, and the return of the Clinton County War...


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keeps her finger on the pulse of the community.


Leading Off.....
For the first time in a long time, the NBA Finals may hve enough history and flavor to make it worth watching.... The Zone is ready to help the youth of the community, but are you?!?
By Brett Adkison


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keeps her finger on the pulse of the community.


Leading Off...
Brett Adkison sounds off on what residents can expect to hear in the local headlines over the summer.


BIts About Em


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keeps her finger on the pulse of the community.


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keeps her finger on the pulse of the community.


Letters to the Editor
Why so hush-hush about teen suicide?; March 27 meeting will help support youth.


From the Superintendent
Lathrop Superintendent Dr. Chris Blackburn


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keeps her finger on the pulse of the community.


Letters to the Editor
Clinton County Coroner warns of "Choking Game." Clinton County roads are bad for a reason.


Post Scripts
In light of recent events, Pauli Clariday makes her return to page two.


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keeps her finger on the pulse of the community.


Capitol Report
By 12th District State Senator Brad Lager


Guest Capitol Highlights
By Rep. Jim Guest


Conservation Comments
By Clinton County MDC Agent Mark Hoover


Leading Off...
Bad sportsmanship is not reserved for one town, powder blues to be seen at The "K", and thanks to the Rader Family.
By Brett Adkison
Rural Reporter


From the Superintendent
After a nice long holiday break for the students and a short working one for the staff, second semester has started off great. Monday morning was the first day for everyone at their respective buildings, and for the most part, everything went smoothly. It is great that the elementary and special services will be able to expand throughout the elementary building, and not have to be in mobile classrooms or try to hold class in areas that weren’t meant to be classrooms. There also won’t be a problem anymore with physical education and lunch sharing the same room.
By Dr. Chris Blackburn


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keeps her finger on the pulse of the community.


Capitol Report
The second legislative session of the 94th General Assembly will formally convene this week. Over the last several weeks, much work has been done to prepare for the upcoming session and pick up where we left off last year. It comes as no surprise that we will be working hard to address healthcare problems, educate Missouri's children, and grow jobs in our state while ensuring a fiscally responsible state budget.
By 12th District Missouri State Senator Brad Lager


Leading Off...
Everyone loves a good quote. A collection of words can do powerful things in this world: Bring people together, motivate, inspire and even bring a tear to your eye. There are few things in this world that beat a group of words that are gathered and organized in such a way that they can spark something inside of you and move you to amazing things.


Bits About Em - 12/20/07
Edith Webb keeps her finger on the pulse of the community.


Capitol Report - 12/20/07
"Pulling together during challenging times."
By Sen. Brad Lager


Leading Off... - 12/20/07
Brett Adkison asks, "When will we, as Clinton County, be able to do something more."


Leading Off...
Brett Adkison sounds off about the Miami Dolphins' 1972 perfect season.


Conservation Comments
Clinton County Conservation Agent Mitch Hoover keeps you informed about the local wildlife and the issues that surround it.


Capitol Report
Missouri State Sen. Brad Lager works to help Missouri's seniors.


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keps her fingers on the pulse of the community.


Leading Off...
Boston just may be th new city of Champions.
By Brett Adkison


Missouri Hunters set a safe record in 2007.
By Vince Crawford, Caldwell County Conservation Agent.


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keeps her finger on the pulse of the community.


Letter to the Editor
Clinton County Commissioner Larry King gives an update on the commission's progress.


Leading Off...
By Brett Adkison


Bits About Em
By Edith Webb


From the Superintendent
By Chris Blackburn, Lathrop C-1 Superintendent


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keeps her finger on the pulse of the community.


Letters to the Editor
Resident has problems with local law enforcement.


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keeps her finger on the pulse of the community.


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keeps her finger on the pulse of the community.


Leading Off...
The roller coaster of being a Kansas City Chiefs Fan.
By Brett Adkison


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keeps her finger on the pulse of the community.


Letter to the Editor
Clinton County resident has zoning problems...


Times to Remember
William Ray Gall explains living on a dirt road in "Muddy Missouri."


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keeps her finger on the pulse of the community.


Letters to the Editor
Citizen disputes ordinance while another believes there are too many big dogs for a little town.


Leading Off...
Wrestling is fake?!? Nahhhhh.......
By Brett Adkison


Times to Remember
Excerpts from Time to Remember, authored by former Lathrop/Turney resident and Polly Grant Award winner William Ray Gall.


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keeps her finger on the pulse of the community.


Leading Off...
Brett Adkison looks beyond Bonds' attempt at 756 to the peopl that surround it.


Post Scripts
Pauli Slibowski asks "Can we get any sillier?" Those at the newspaper office look back at Saturday morning cartoons.


Leading Off...
By Brett Adkison


Post Scripts
By Pauli Slibowski


Post Scripts
By Pauli Slibowski


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keeps her fingers on the pulse pf the community.


Leading Off...
Ever wonder what the best sports movies of all time rank? Me too.


Post Scripts
Pauli Slibowski's insight to the world.


Letters to the Editor


Leading Off...


Bits about Em


Be our Guest


Leading Off...
Coming this fall... the Clinton County War.


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keeps her finger on the pulse of the community.


Letter to the editor


Leading Off...
Randy Moss and Tom Brady... what an odd couple.
By Brett Adkison


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keeps her fingers on the pulse of the community


Leading Off...
Brett Adkison wants a championship in Kansas City.


Letter to the Editor
Clinton County Library may not be a reality, but it is still a topic of debate.


Bits About Em
Edith Webb has her finger on the pulse of Lathrop.


Leading Off...
Its baseball season.. so why is it so cold?!?
By Brett Adkison


Letters to the Editor
Disappointed in failed Tax Levy


From the Superintendent
by Lathrop Superintendent Dr. Chris Blackburn


Post Scripts
Passionate issues bring out passionate opinions...
By Pauli Slibowski


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keeps her finger on the pulse of Lathrop.


From the desk of the City Administrator
Don Moore's weekly insight to the city of Lathrop


From the Superintendent
Lathrop School District Superintendent Dr. Chris Blackburn


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keeps her finger on the pulse of the community.


Leading Off...
Brett Adkison sounds off on the Penguins, Chiefs, Royals, and the Brigade.


Letters to the Editor
Upcoming election, loose pets, and Clinton County Library all addressed by local residents


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keeps her finger on the pulse of the community.


Conservation Comments
By Clinton County MDC Agent Mitch Hoover


Letters to the Editor
Rodney Greer looks for feedback from Lathrop residents before election, while Lisa Holsted feels that the recent city decision is "greedy."


Post Scripts
Pauli Slibowski looks to the future of the Rural Reporter.


Be Our Guest
By Rayann Herndon, Lathrop Outreach Committee


Post Scripts
By Pauli Slibowski


Leading Off...
Uuuggghhh..... is it baseball season yet?
By Brett Adkison


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keeps her finger on the pulse of Lathrop.


Letter to the Editor
Dorothy Silvius advocates a county library


Post Scrips
Pauli Slibowski looks to slow down and take life in.


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keeps her finger on the pulse of the community


Post Scripts
Anger Management for Dummies?
By Pauli Slibowski


Leading Off...
Peyton Manning may not win the Super Bowl, but he WILL save its ratings.
By Brett Adkison


From the Superintendent
Lathrop Schools' Superintendent Dr. Chris Blackburn


Conservation Comments
Clinton County MDC Agent Mitch Hoover


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keeps her finger on the pulse of Lathrop residents.


Letters to the Editor
A softball mother stands up for Lady Mules' coach Mike Epperson


Leading Off...
There's more to high school sports than winning, Chiefs loss Saturday could have been avoided.
By Brett Adkison


Post Scripts
Pauli Slibowski asks: How big is God?


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keeps her finger on the pulse of Lathrop


From the Desk of the City Adminstrator
Don Moore's weekly insight to the city of Lathrop


Leading Off...
The Chiefs prove Brett Adkison wrong... again.


Post Scripts
Pauli Slibowski wonders what makes super heros so super.


Conservation Comments
Clinton County MDC Agent Mitch Hoover


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keeps her finger on the pulse of the community


Leading Off...
Brett Adkison does what is too often overlooked... saying thank you to those that help


Post Scripts
Pauli Slibowski's weekly look at life


Bits About Em
By Edith Webb


Conservation Comments
By Mitch Hoover


Post Scripts
Ignoring sales calls isn't always the best option!
By Pauli Slibowski


Leading Off...
Rocky Balboa hits the streets on Dec. 22, but will it flop or be a knockout?
By Brett Adkison


Bits About Em
Edith Webb has her finger on the pulse of the community.


Post Scripts
Only in Lathrop...
By Pauli Slibowski


Leading Off...
Brett Adkison rips the BCS.


From the desk of the city Administrator
Don Moore's weekly insight to the city of Lathrop


Bits About Em


Leading Off...
Ortiz is passed up for MVP again... sportswriters have no clue what they are talking about!!!


From the Desk of the City Administrator
Don Moore outlines the new burning ordinance in Lathrop


From the Superintendent


Bits About Em
By Edith Webb


Conservation Comments
Mitch Hoover, Clinton County MDC Agent


Letter to the Editor
Mike Waltemath talks of the political system and how it came to be this way.


Leading off...
The future of Lathrop football doesn't look half bad.


From the Desk of the City Administrator
A weekly insight to the city of Lathrop by Don Moore


Post Scripts
Three girls, a guy, and a little black dog!!


From the Superintendent
Chris Blackburn
Lathrop C-1 superintendent


Bit about em
By Edith Webb


From the Desk of the City Admistrator.
Don Moore's weekly insight to the city of Lathrop.


Letter to the Editor
Lathrop resident urges town's people to stand up and speak against the Lathrop Police Department, while another speaks of next weeks election and how we need to pay more attenion.


Bits About Em
By Edith Webb


From the Superintendent
Dr. Chris Blackburn
Lathrop C-1 Superintendent


From the Desk of the City Administrator
Don Moore's weekly insight to the city of Lathrop.


Post Scripts
Pauli talks about firsts, lasts, and the beauty in between.
By Pauli Slibowski


Bits About'em
By Edith Webb


Letter to the Editor
The opinions expressed in the letters to the editor do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Lathrop Publishing.


Post Scripts
Pauli Slibowski gives her opinion on the proposed amendments.


From the Desk of the City Administrator
Don Moore's weekly insight to the city of Lathrop


From the Superintendent
By Lathrop C-1 superintendent Chris Blackburn


Leading Off
The dedication that Buck O'Neil put into the game of baseball and the state of Missouri will be felt for years to come.
By Brett Adkison


From the Superintendent
Dr. Chris Blackburn praises Lathrop's homecoming, talks of this month's school board meeting.


From the Desk of the City Administrstor
Don Moore's weekly insight to the city of Lathrop


From the Superintendent
Chris Blackburn lets you know where your school district stands


From the Desk of the City Administrator
Don Moore's weekly look at the city of Lathrop


From the Superintendent
Chris Blackburn lets you in on the Lathrop School MAP scores, mid-terms, and the progress of the new school


Conservation Comments
Clinton County MDC agent Mith Hoover informs us on Canada goose hunting


From the Desk of the City Administrator
Don Moore's article that provides insight to the city of Lathrop


Post Scripts
What is the value of a good neighbor?
By Pauli Slibowski


Conservation Comments
Clinton County MDC agent Mitch Hoover announces upcoming hunter education classes


Bits About Em
Edith Webb keeps her finger on the pulse of the community


Post Scripts
Pauli Slibowski remembers the events of 9/11 and the effects they have had in the last five years


From the Desk of the City Administrator
Don Moore's weekly commentary that takes you inside the city of Lathrop.


Leading Off
This week, Brett Adkison talks about Trent Green's career, and the hit that put it in jeopardy.


From the Desk of The City Administrator
The Solid Waste Pick-up and Removal Contract expires in early ...


Letters to the Editor
In remembrance of Fred...


Conservation Comments
Are you interested in taking a walk in the woods and making a little money at the same time? Then seed gathering is for yo...


By The Way
Driving Miss Tonya...


Bits About Em
Good Morning,

Fall is in the air, cool mornings and evenings, and finally the ...


Post Scripts
Hats off to volunteers...


Post Scripts
“Do you ever

question yourself?”...


From the Desk of The City Administrator
The Planning Commission will not hold a public hearing on September 16, 2003 as was published ...


By The Way
A BELL AND A CANNON...


Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor,

I am once again reminded as to why I choose to live in this ...


From the Desk of The City Administrator
I have received word from Region D Solid Waste District that ...


By The Way
MOSCOW IMPRESSIONS...


Bits About Em
Hello,

Another hot week to look forward to....


Cornfield Surprise
By: Lucile Anderson

The year was 1936 - hot, dry, no rain; much like 2003. I was ...


Post Scripts
My kind of store......


Letters to the Editor
To the people of Lathrop,...


Letter to the Editor
Hey, isn't it a great summer! Our kids are having fun....


From the Desk of The City Administrator
Elsewhere in this publication is a notice concerning a public ...


From the Superintendent
Well its back to school and it is about time! I know that students ...


Bits About Em
Good Morning,

Hot! - Hot! But it will cool off one of these days....


Bits About Em
Good Morning,

Been a busy week for lots of folks, reunions, vacations, school ...


Post Scripts
Good bye Miss Sandy...


From the Desk of The City Administrator
The drought continues. The water sales through the coin ...


God Found A Soul Today
In Loving Memory Of Sandy Ross...


Post Scripts
The price of beauty...


Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor,

I wish to congratulate the City of Lathrop on their Friendship ...


Conservation Comments
If you are interested in managing your land for Bobwhite quail, the Missouri Department of Conservation has...


Bits About Em
Good Morning,

Is everyone rested up from the Festival, and getting ready for the Rodeo? ...


Post Scripts
There's a lot to be said about a t-shirt read...


From the Desk of The City Administrator
The City of Lathrop water pressure is normal at 59 psi this...


From the Superintendent
The time is quickly approaching and the excitement is growing ....


Bits About Em
Good Morning,

Lot of fog this morning, reminds me of fall, but it is still too hot ...


Post Scripts
Ahhh... vacation time....


From the Desk of The City Administrator
The City of Lathrop has been experiencing water pressure lower than our normal of 58-59 psi....


Bits About Em
Good Morning,

A little cooler this morning, sure is nice, but we still need rain....


From the Desk of The City Administrator
We continue to have problems locating the owners of some of the vacant property in Lathrop. ...


Capital Highlights
From Jim Guest 5th District Representative

The Year 2003 may go down as one of the more memorable ...


By The Way
A GOOD TIME WAS HAD BY ALL...


Letters to the Editor
Hello, I don't know if you do anything like this or not. But would you know anything about a Joe (Joseph) Hulett ....


Bits About Em
Good Morning,

I sure hope you folks are staying cool.....


The City Administrator
Last week I wrote about positive things. This week is a different...


Bits About Em
Good Morning,

Are you having trouble keeping cool?


Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor,

Last week Jane DeCecco was fired from her position with the ...


From the Desk of The City Administrator
In this column, I often write about negative situations such parking issues, shoppers scattered in the streets,...


By The Way
Independence Day...


Bits About Em
Good Morning,

I have been sweet talking to my tomato plants...


Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor,

On May 31st we mailed questions concerning the mold in the ...


From the Desk of The City Administrator
The lift station located at the lagoon that pumps all City of Lathrop wastewater is being equipped with sensors...


Capitol Highlights
The Special Session continues into week four with the Governor calling us back to continue his push for higher taxes. ...


By The Way
A Lesson From

Mr. No-name...


Bits About Em
Good Morning,

I hear it will be hot today and I for one am going to stay inside...


Bits About Em
Good Morning,

I hear it will be hot today and I for one am going to stay inside...


From the Desk of The City Administrator
By: Don Moore, City Administrator

We have increased the parking area at Ingram Field....


Capitol Highlights
From Jim Guest 5th District Representative

Week three of the Special Session begins with the four budget ...


By The Way
Ruth's Proposal...


Bits About Em
Good Morning,

Isn't this a nice day, enjoyed the weekend, however one of my ...


Letters to the Editor
Dear Mr. Slibowski,

The May 29 edition of the Rural Reporter had the story and pictures of the Memorial Day ceremony at the Lathrop Cemetery....


From the Desk of The City Administrator
The Fy2004 budget has been reviewed and discussed for the past few weeks to make the adjustments necessary to achieve ...


By The Way
ONE GRAIN AT A TIME?...


Capitol Highlights
From Jim Guest 5th District Representative...


Bits About Em
Good Morning,

Nice shower this morning about 3:00 a.m., little noisy but good for my tomatoes....


Letters to the Editor
Several parents attended the May 12th school board meeting to address the board with questions concerning the mold issue...


From the Desk of The City Administrator
Mayor Roy Wieneke, Alderman Paul Assel, and I will be attending the Newly Elected Officials Conference in Jefferson ...


Capitol Highlights
From Jim Guest 5th District Representative

This is week one of the Special Session called by Governor Bob....


Bits About Em
Tomato Wars... The Saga Continues!...


Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor,

Recently I wrote to you asking your readers to send me post cards about your state....


Capitol Highlights
By now most people know that Governor Bob Holden has vetoed ...


By The Way
MEMORIAL DAY, 2003...


Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor;

I have noticed over the past few years that Fastbreak ...


From the Desk of The City Administrator
We have recently purchased telephone answering machines for...


By The Way
ISHPEMING AND HEL...


Bits About Em
A little cool this morning, but will warm up later in the day. I don't...


Letters to the Editor
I'm writing to respond to an action that the administration at Lathrop High School has taken. The administration has ...


Capitol Highlights
Last week the General Assembly gave final approval to the FY2004 Budget, by the constitutional deadline, and sent it to the...


From the Desk of The City Administrator
A Budget Workshop was held on May 6, 2003 at 6:30 PM. The Mayor and all Board of Aldermen members were present....


From the Superintendent
All school districts throughout the state are currently waiting in ...


By The Way
As often is the case, the Germans have a word for it. In this ...


Bits About Em
Another fine day, weather clearing up. School will soon be out,...


Letters to the Editor
My sincere thanks to Senator Kit Bond: As an Oats volunteer, I ....


From the Desk of The City Administrator
Lathrop clean-up day yielded nineteen (19) tons of trash. Costs...


Letters to the Editor
My sincere thanks to Senator Kit Bond: As an Oats volunteer, I ....


From the Desk of The City Administrator
Lathrop clean-up day yielded nineteen (19) tons of trash. ...


From the Superintendent
Last Friday, May 2nd, Lathrop R-II School District held the Special Field Day Program...


Capitol Highlights
The session is nearing the end and the tension is building,...


Letters to the Editor
We as concerned parents are writing this letter to inform ...


From the Desk of The City Administrator
Lathrop clean-up day yielded approximately four and one-half ....


Bits About Em
We sure had some nice rain last week, maybe we will get ...


Fwd: Fwd: Just For Fun :-) :-)
In light of the recent appeals court ruling in California, with respect to the Pledge of Allegiance, the following recollection ...


From the Desk of The City Administrator
Another reminder that Lathrop clean-up day is April 26, 2003 ....


By The Way
ROY AND THE ROYALS...


Capitol Highlights
Missouri is facing its worst budget situation in recent memory. ....


Bits About Em
A fine day, just beautiful. Haven't heard much about ...


Capitol Highlights
April 14, 2003

This past week at the Capitol was one of the...


From the Desk of The City Administrator
As I'm sure those who are interested already know, Roy Wieneke was elected Mayor for a two-year term beginning...


By The Way
THE EMPTY TOMB


From the Desk of The City Administrator
The April Board of Aldermen meeting will have a minimum of a ...


By The Way
THIS WAR, ONCE MORE...


Capital Highlights
From Jim Guest 5th District Representative...


From the Desk of The City Administrator
The spring clean up day for the City of Lathrop has been ....


By The Way
BUSY-NESS IN WARTIME...


Bits About Em
Nice Morning.

Little dry but nice, soon be that time for mushrooms,.....


Letters to the Editor
Just some thoughts: Isn't it great that we live in a country where ....


From the Desk of
he spring clean up day for the City of Lathrop has not been ...


By The Way
THE WAR, WEEK TWO...


Bits About Em
Good Morning,...


Letters to the Editor
I realize that we are entering into spring, with warm weather and ..


Letters to teh Editor
I have considered writing on numerous occasions for one ...


Conservation Comments
By the large amount of radio traffic I have heard lately, it is...


From the Desk of The City Administrator
The Board of Aldermen met on Monday night, March 17, 2003. ..


By The Way
SO IT'S WAR...


Capital Highlights
They told us at the beginning of this session that the activity ...


Bits About Em
What a beautiful sun shining day the Lord has made...


Capital Highlights
From Jim Guest 5th District Representative...


Conservation Comments
By Mitch Hoover, Clinton County MDC Agent...


Fwd: Fwd: Just For Fun :-) :-)
You are exactly where you are meant to be ...


By The Way
Simplicity...


From the Desk of The City Administrator
The City Park has the distinction of having a tree appear like an ...


Bits About Em
Beautiful day, well I am back for another two weeks. ...


From the Desk of The City Administrator
The City is putting an emphasis on reducing the number of cars parked within the city limits...


By The Way
I'm going to ask a favor. This is the fourth week in a row on ...


From the Superintendent
Last week the Community Liaison committee met for the first ...


Bits About Em
Good Morning Lathrop,...


Capital Highlights
The looming budget deficit for the Fiscal Year 2004 was the ...


From the Desk of The City Administrator
The City of Lathrop has contracted Ponzer-Youngquist ...


By The Way
I wondered whether to interrupt this series on the various loves, ...


Bits About Em
For the folks that like it cold...


Letters to the Editor
To the Lathrop PTO...


From the Desk of The City Administrator
This column is written to enlighten Lathrop citizens about how some of their tax dollars are spent....


By The Way
Last week, in celebration of Valentine's Day, we began to think ...


Bits About Em
Nice rain we had, good weather coming up. Spring's on its way,...


Know Your Neighbor
Our neighbor last week was Jewell Anderson. ..


Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor,

I wrote this as a tribute to a family friend...


From the Desk of The City Administrator
I attended a one-day grant workshop in Plattsburg on Monday,...


By The Way
We love, and we are loved, or we die. That seems an extreme....


Know Your Neighbor
Our neighbor this week was born in northeast Clinton County....


Bits About Em
Good Morning,

Nice and frosty out there, we did have some snow last week, but we still need lots more moisture, so when we...


From the Desk of The City Administrator
he sign up period for the April election is nearing a close. ...


Capital Highlights
From Jim Guest 5th District Representative...


Know Your Neighbor
Our “Mystery Neighbor” this week is a 20 year resident of ...


Bits About Em
Good morning;

A good and cold morning, but I am a firm believer that it takes ...


From the Desk of The City Administrator
The sign up period for the April election is nearing a close. We have one candidate for Mayor, one candidate for Alderman...


By The Way
Are you ready for a little silliness?...


Bits About Em
A Frosty Good Morning to You;...


From the Desk of The City Administrator
We are being asked about what can be done with Christmas trees. We have decided that local...


By The Way
Sometimes, a football game can do surprising things to people...


Know Your Neighbor
Well, with the holidays and all, I am feeling a bit nostalgic. So ...


Bits About Em
As we start this New Year, Let us look forward to a better year,..


Barnesville School Days
Enclosed is an e-mail message I received from my brother, Ray. C. Williams, who resides in Lansing, Michigan......


From the Desk of The City Administrator
I missed the deadline last week since the Rural Reporter had to be printed on Tuesday because of the Christmas holiday. ...


By The Way
A FRESH START

The New Year is only a few hours old. Actually,...


Bits About Em
Beautiful day, but it sure doesn't seem like Christmas and New ...


By The Way
What Can We Do With A Week?....


Bits About Em
Good Morning and Merry Christmas, Most folks still shopping for Christmas, some I couldn’t call....


From the Desk ofThe City Administrator
The Board of Aldermen meeting is this week on Tuesday night. ...


By The Way
This Sunday will be Fourth Advent and Christmas Sunday. ...


Know Your Neighbor
In the course of her life, Robin Douglas has lived in five different states. ...


Bits About Em
We might get a little rain today, hope so, but no ice....


From the Desk of The City Administrator
In last week's column I mentioned trash being scattered about by animals. I notice...


By The Way
Third Advent...


Know Your Neighbor
Jeanne Huntley has been part of the Lathrop Community for 14 years,...


Bits About Em
Good Morning, ...


Post Scripts
Necessity is the mother of invention.. isn't that what they say?....


From the Desk of The City Administrator
We continue to receive questions concerning City of Lathrop ...


By The Way
Are you still with me for a look at Advent,...


Know Your Neighbor
When Sandy Schoonover asked me why I chose her for this ...


Bits About Em
Good Morning;...


Letters to the Editor
This letter is in response to the City Administrator Column, ....


By The Way
It's Friday. What's left of the turkey is destined to be ...


Know Your Neighbor
I attend the same church as Jim and Inez Austin, and am lucky enough to consider them friends of my family...


Bits About Em
No Snow! I am glad that Thompson missed it, ...


Letters to the Editor
Having lived in Lathrop all of my life, I feel that for the most part, this is a great town with wonderful people in...


Conservation Comments
Missourians enjoyed an unusually successful opening of...


From the Desk of
We occasionally have residents believing their property is being infringed upon by utility companies...


By The Way
U.S. Thanksgiving Day comes as late this year as it can come, November 28. Does that mean we have a little ...


Bits About Em
Good morning.

Beautiful day and they say it will continue through this week....


Fwd: Fwd: Just For Fun :-) :-)
One day, when I was a freshman in high school,...


From the Desk of The City Administrator
I think FALL has finally arrived with the amount of leaves on the lawns and in the street ditches. Several people have...


By The Way
No That I Can Dance...


Conservation Comments
Ok, here are some fairly simple rules for deer season...


From the Superintendent:
It certainly has been an eventful week. Last Thursday...


Know Your Neighbor
Originally from Osborn, Missouri, she considers Lathrop...


Bits About Em
A Frosty Good Morning,...


Letters to the Editor
City of Kearney Makes Money off of Soccer Tournament..


From the Desk of The City Administrator
The letters about the delinquent water debts have brought on ....


By The Way
What’s in A Name...


Bits About Em
Good Morning:Kind of damp and gloomy this morning...


Conservation Comments
Missouri's Youth Deer Season will be this coming weekend, ...


Letters to the Editor
Relford Thanks you...


Letter to the Editor
Where's the truth in advertising?...


From the Desk of
The Board of Aldermen voted in a special meeting to proceed ...


By The Way
If you receive the paper on Thursdays, you can read this on Halloween. (Whether you do read it on Halloween is anothe...


Know Your Neighbor
Walt Bowers is a Lathrop native through...


Bits About Em
Not much news to report this week...


From the Desk of The City Administrator
The City of Lathrop fall cleanup day for the City of Lathrop ...


Know Your Neighbor
Last Week’s Know Your Neighbor featured Part One of my visit with Ruth Walker, below Part Two is featured...


Bits About Em (Community News)
A sad morning today, another shooting and lot of sickness....


From the Desk of The City Administrator
The City of Lathrop received a letter and a new Building Code Effectiveness Schedule Classification ...


By The Way
How much for your hog, Mister?


From the Desk of
We are often frowned at when someone comes in to sign up...


By The Way


Know Your Neighbor
Peggy Stokes and her husband Jim have lived in Lathrop since 1976. Jim had served in the Navy...


Conservation Comments
Archery deer and turkey season has just opened ...


From the Superintendent:
What an exciting five days and great homecoming ...


By The Way
You've heard, and probably have used, the old proverb...


Conservation Comments
We're looking for skunks again! This time the Conservation Department is looking specifically for...


From the desk of the City Administrator
The new basketball rims and backboards for the City Park have both been set in place and the posts...


By the Way
The Septic Tank And The Barn Wall


Conservation Comments
The timing of Missouri's early Canada goose season allows hunters to...


From the desk of the City Administrator
The Board of Aldermen met September 10, 2002 to discuss what steps are necessary to upgrade ...


By the Way
Two + Two = Four?


Conservation Comments
The Missouri Department of Conservation will offer a Hunter Education Certification Class...
Note: By Mitch Hoover, Clinton County MDC Agent


From the Desk of the City Administrator
The City of Lathrop receives information concerning the vulnerability of utilities to acts of terrorism. We are warned...
Note: By: Don Moore; City Administrator


From the Desk of the City Administrator
The City of Lathrop receives information concerning the vulnerability of utilities to acts of terrorism. We are warned...
Note: By: Don Moore; City Administrator


By The Way
The Man From Hannibal
Note: By Dr. Joseph Coleson, Pastor United Methodist Church-Lathrop and Turney


From the Desk of the City Administrator
I was invited to speak to the local Rotary Club about the issues facing the City of Lathrop and some...
Note: By: Don Moore; City Administrator


By The Way
September 11th
Note: By Dr. Joseph Coleson, Pastor United Methodist Church-Lathrop and Turney


By The Way
Joy


Conservation Comments
State officials say regulations approved by the Missouri Conservation Commission provide the best balance for keeping chronic wasting disease (CWD) out of the state...
Note: By Mitch Hoover, Clinton County MDC Agent


From the Desk of the City Administrator
The demolition of the old "bus barn" took place this Monday. Changes such as this in the City landscape are...
Note: By: Don Moore; City Administrator


By The Way
Do You Want To Learn?
Note: By Dr. Joseph Coleson, Pastor United Methodist Church-Lathrop and Turney


Conservation Comments
Thirty youngsters will have an opportunity to spend a day learning about doves and dove hunting at the...
Note: By Mitch Hoover, Clinton County MDC Agent


From the Desk of the City Administrator
Many of the residents of the City of Lathrop experienced a lagoon odor this past week. We installed aerators...
Note: By: Don Moore; City Administrator


By The Way
School Days
Note: By Dr. Joseph Coleson, Pastor United Methodist Church-Lathrop and Turney


Conservation Comments
I realize that when the thermometer hovers in the 95 degree range, it might be hard to get too excited about the coming hunting seasons. But, the time to start...
Note: By Mitch Hoover, Clinton County MDC Agent


From the Desk of the City Administrator
The Lathrop water system water pressure has returned to 60psi on the gauge at City Hall. Old water meters continue to be switched out for the new radio...
Note: By: Don Moore; City Administrator


By The Way
Everybody’s a Critic
Note: By Dr. Joseph Coleson, Pastor United Methodist Church-Lathrop and Turney


From the Desk of the City Administrator
The Lathrop water system has been put through the test this past two weeks. The Plattsburg system had a leak...
Note: By: Don Moore; City Administrator


By The Way
Summer At The Lakes


Conservation Comments
I recently found an interesting article in the September 14, 1926 St. Joseph Gazette. The contrast between the "old school" of fish and wildlife management...
Note: By Mitch Hoover, Clinton County MDC Agent


From the Desk of the City Administrator
The City of Lathrop Water Quality Report (Consumer Confidence Report) is printed in this edition of the Rural Reporter. The Department of Natural Resources requires this information to be made...
Note: By Don Moore, City Administrator


From the Desk of the City Administrator
An interesting experience occurred last week when a future water customer came in to sign up for water in Ballybrook on...
Note: By Don Moore, City Administrator


By The Way
Under The Sun
Note: By Dr. Joseph Coleson, Pastor United Methodist Church-Lathrop and Turney


From the Desk of the City Administrator
As was noted in the Rural Reporter last week, I attended a week long Grant Proposal writing seminar in Atchison, Kansas. The training...
Note: By Don Moore, City Administrator


By The Way
VANITY OF VANITIES?
Note: By Dr. Joseph Coleson, Pastor United Methodist Church-Lathrop and Turney


Conservation Comments
The keys to helping prevent deaths and injuries from firearms accidents, literally, are coming to a city near you. Firearms locks, keys to secure...


From the Desk of the City Administrator
The response to the many letters advising residents to install address numbers was generally well received. The majority of residents have responded by...
Note: By Don Moore, City Administrator


By The Way
Amazing Grace
Note: By Dr. Joseph Coleson, Pastor United Methodist Church-Lathrop and Turney


From the Desk of the City Administrator
The regular May Board of Al The City Budget is complete except for last minute changes. A special meeting may be required...
Note: By Don Moore, City Administrator


By The Way
Who Are The Martyrs?
Note: By Dr. Joseph Coleson, Pastor United Methodist Church-Lathrop and Turney

 
 

 
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